New answers tagged

5

There is no standard size for such thing. Font size also differs per font, since readability per font is very different. It depends on the general design of the card as well. For most fonts I would say 6-7 is too small though. I like to stick around 9-10 but this again depends on the font and the amount of information I need to put on the card.


-1

if it is an gradient overlay convert it into shape and in the fill option of the shape give your desired gradient


0

Based on what I understand of the issue, it sounds like you need to create a constant shape and then just have versions of it with different text. If that is correct, then Type > Convert to Area Type should help you make the constant shape.


5

they warned me that the edges might not be perfect This depends on how they plan on enlarging the print for cutting. If they keep the ratio to fit the height of 4", then .6667" will be cut at the max width (.33" from the left and .33" from the right). This may be a problem depending on how the design was made. This will most likely be an issue if your ...


1

Click on the Paths tab located in your Layers Palette and then click on your layer with all of the sub-paths on it, probably called "Work Path" When you apply the type to a path, it will isolate the one path—on which you've applied the type—from the others and create a new Type Path. In the case above, I typed a bunch of gibberish on one path, hence the ...


8

Indesign comes with a script called findchangebylist.jsx. It does exactly what you want, but it's pretty tedious to use. So tedious, that many people have created scripts for this same task. I would recommend checking some of these out: Find Change By Queries My personal favorite. Easy to use. Multi-Find/Change 2.0 ( Indesign and Incopy ) Extension An ...


1

Align to Bottom in the Alignment Panel


1

If you are going to print these then you are much better served by PostScript (PS) than SVG. PostScript engines have better quality checks than SVG. But more than that PS actually defines printer color spaces something that SVG does not do well at this point, not that most viewers would even begin to support this. Regardless of format issues you should be ...


1

I have 2 methods 1) Optical Character Recognition Software If you don't need the original image, it may be better to recreate the page. I have used the following site to scan text from PDFs or images: http://www.onlineocr.net/ This online service will scan the document for text and convert into editable Word, Excel and Text output formats. 2) Puppet ...


1

If this is scanned text and you don't need it to look like scanned page do some magic in Adobe Acrobat. http://blogs.adobe.com/acrolaw/2013/06/straighten-and-deskew-pdf-pages-in-acrobat-xi/ From Tools select "Document processing". Click "Optimize Scanned PDF", Deselect “Apply Adaptive Compression” and from "Filters" options choose the one that you would ...


-3

I believe what you're looking for is image distortion. Though not always providing the best results it is definitely something you could start and work with. Here are a couple of approaches put together that you can try. http://creativepro.com/know-your-photoshop-distortion-tools/


2

Unless you have the original Gimp file with the text still as a text layer, no you can't. Identifying a font from a raster image is complex and well beyond the scope of Gimp's feature set. There are online services that can help with font identification from an image, such as What The Font. You can also ask here on GD.SE, but make sure you ask a good ...


0

Maybe because it is vector text. Try to render the text layer as bitmap, or duplicate the document, make it unique layer and export to PDF.


1

I'm on CC platform so it might be a bit different (it has a better svg export), but you can do it in two ways. kerning if you want to keep the text as <text>, you can edit the svg manually: Kerning is treated bit like tracking, so the text is "chopped" in fragments with other values and each of these fragments is wrapped in <tspan> tag with a ...


1

Right click on the text layer -> Convert to Smart Object. Duplicate that layer and place the other layers wherever else you want to display the same text. To change text, double click the thumbnail (that will open a new window/tab where the text is in its own file) and change text, File -> Save when done. If you add more text than originally there you will ...


1

You'll want to be using a vector application for the most part. Affinity Designer is a good prosumer option while Inkscape is the opensource option. Sketch is another option but its intended more for Interface design than the two aforementioned but it can be used for logos. If you mean an app for mobile you could try Adobe Illustrator Draw since you're on ...


3

Good question! I really like, and agree with, the answers given so far. My answer focuses more on pragmatic technique rather than scientific or mathematical reasoning. :D With that said, my preference is to use the baseline and x-height (see Type Terms section below) as the starting point for my box’s top and bottom lines respectively. Hopefully this GIF ...


2

You can do this in Photoshop if you look into Photoshop scripting. You do not indicate what version of Photoshop you're using but here is the documentation for multiple versions of Photoshop. If your target button is on a layer you could do something like: theButton = app.activeDocument.artLayers.getByName("button"); and then target the text with ...


2

Not in Photoshop. In layout applications such as InDesign and Scribus this is generally possible. What you can do however is put the text in a text box the width of the button. But vertical alignment doesn't exist (see: How to center text vertically within a textbox in Photoshop). There are ways to make it a little more efficient using the alignment ...


0

You can do this in Indesign, setting alignment to top, middle or bottom using Object Styles. I'm not 100%, but I don't think it's available in Illustrator. reg. 2nd question: When working with text in Illustrator use Area type text. Here is a little trick I use: I constantly switch between point and and Area type. (Menus - Type - Convert to X type) I use ...


0

Highlight your "i" and press option + shift + B


2

Visual weight is so dynamic that it really cannot be dictated by x-height, cap height, etc... Certain elements in your design may pull the eye in one direction over the other despite mathematically being "center", from its left to right side in comparison to the canvas, for instance. The "visual center" is where all of the elements weights are balanced ...


2

Design is not always an exact science. Often what looks correct, may not be what is the true center or what is mathematically correct. Specifically, in your question it would depend on the ascenders and descenders in the text to determine best the optical alignment. If there are no ascenders or descenders, the ideal alignment can change. In your examples, ...


0

try define css rule for text: word-spacing: 0px; If this is not sufficient, try to use negative values: word-spacing: -5px;


0

I would try to flatten all the layers and save out that way. Obviously make a copy or try not to save over your PSD. Or "merge to new layer" and try exporting that way.


6

Set up your text frames with a custom baseline grid that starts offset from the top of the frame. Set the Start to a value big enough to fit your headers: Set the paragraph style for your body text to align to the baseline grid: In the paragraph style for your headers, under Keep Options, set your headers to always start on a new frame. Make sure your ...


1

The only way I can think to do this is to create a master pages with pre-defined text frames positioned where you want them. If Column A on the left will always be the header (your red bar) and only your header, and there will never be headers in any other column, then create your master page called header that way. Your text will flow into the container ...


2

You can, by changing InDesign's default Justifications parameters. However, you should not do nor want to do that. Starting with replicating your result: – this is 11/13 pt Times New Roman in a frame 60.5mm wide –, I found I had to insert multiple spaces in exactly those places in your "total mess". In modern typesetting, entering multiple spaces in ...


3

Edit: It's not impossible per-se. But impossible without changing some other spacing (which you probably don't want to do) (see Rad Lexus' answer) You can't. It's impossible. If all the spaces were equal you would no longer have equal line lengths (i.e. not justified). There is no way around that. The justification options in your paragraph style (Word ...


0

I'm not sure if this is "automated" enough for your needs, but you could try giving the left-hand column a right-aligned tab, and leaving the right-hand column as is (both columns still technically left-justified):


2

Here's a quick tut. Create background with darker color then desired font. I used black. The write with chosen font what you want. Add stroke, I've chosen 4pt. Copy text, paste in place (shift+ctrl"cmd"+v). Remove stroke and change color to "shadowy" (20K in my case). Paste text again. remove stroke, change to white and move it up and left "a notch"...


0

Like most things in Illustrator (and graphic arts in general) there are several different ways to achieve this effect. If you want it to be fast you could, create a drop shadow with a 100% hardness on the edge and negative y-axis offset. If you want more control over the text, create a duplicate text layer, change the fill color, warp/transform to get the ...


0

It's a normal dropshadow, made by (most probably) copied text with darkened color that got slightly moved down and right (and placed under the initial letters) and then another text that got enlarged and it all got it's dark blue outline. That's how I would go for such an effect. Hope that helps ; )



Top 50 recent answers are included