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17

With Gimp comes a plugin Resynthesize together with a Python script Heal Selection. On Linux the plugin is contained in the package gimp-plugin-registry. After selecting an area with the select tool: We can "heal" this selection from "Filters > Enhance > Heal selection...". Here I made a random healing with 10 pixels from the surrounding:


9

A very similar question was asked not long ago: How to recreate this background in photoshop for use in a mobile app? The one you provided is a little different with some wavy lines added. I was able to create something pretty close by doing the following: Step 1: Create a document with the desired size and color Step 2: As per the answer in the linked ...


9

I would approach this in a similar way to horatio, but I would probably keep the original image in tact as much as possible (assuming you want to preserve it). I'd create a similar texture to the paper like so: It's just a noise texture against a subtle gradient with some distortions via a horizontal and vertical scale. You'll notice some color ...


6

Patterns are made using tiny elements that join seamlessly when they repeat. Most site backgrounds are made in this way. The advantages are: a) you're just repeating a tiny image, so the page remains light, and b) the background automatically adapts to the browser window. This is really what Photoshop is doing when you fill a selection with a pattern: the ...


6

This is what I quickly cooked up: To accomplish this: Type your text in a bold font type. color black Set the Fill to 20% (important, set fill to 20%... not opacity) Now it shines through. If you want to give it an offset, do this: Double click on your text layer in the layer box. Set the Drop Shadow to white, blending mode to normal, opacity 50%, ...


5

This is a basic run down. There are a couple areas which require some choices and trial and error, but this should give the basics. Create a new square document. I used 500x500 pixels. And add a series of horizontal lines distributed evenly. Note: the document does not have a line across the bottom edge. The bottom of the canvas ends where that next line ...


5

One of the issues you might be encountering is the color of the texture you are using. That yellow shade doesn't translate very well into an effect. If you first desaturate your texture and then apply it using, for example, Hard Light, your final result will be much more similar to your example: So to clarify, the steps are: Create a new layer with ...


4

gold typically doesn't have texture. I assume you're asking how to make a surface look reflective like Gold. A tutorial on making chrome text (a popular tutorial in a lot of image editing software) should get you there. Just swap the greys of chrome for the yellows of gold: http://inkscapetutorials.wordpress.com/2008/01/31/chrome-text-effect/


4

The Photoshop CS5 solution: 1. Take a photograph. 2. Edit the picture, making selections and filling them using the "Content-Aware" to make it seamless. 3. Use Filter/Other/Offset and set the offset to whatever is 50% of height and width (ex. +50, +50). 4. Use Clone Tool to take away all seems. 5. Use Offset once again, this time with negative digits, -50, ...


4

Try following this tutorial: http://www.suite101.com/content/make-an-easy-shiny-plastic-button-in-gimp-a104126 It is supposed to create this image: If you then make the background black, slant (and optionally slightly curve) the line, and remove the rounded corners, then you should get an effect similar to what you are looking for.


4

I would recommend Photoshop in your case. Just make the rock shape with the pen tool, and if you're not good at digital painting, you could easily use layer styles to make the rock "pop" out a bit like they did in the game. Edit: Here's something I quickly scrapped up. Simple pen-tool-made shape. Put a stroke on it, and did the default gradient overlay set ...


4

there is a very simple way to do this,in this tutorial the guy used another technique to apply pattern,we have something very easy than that go to the layer on which you want to apply texture/pattern.double click on it,a window will pop out saying layer style,in tutorial he also applied a color to make blue bit dark/another color, you can do this by applying ...


4

I don't have a sample to hand, but from memory of the box I used to have: The majority of the box is printed black The whole printed area is 'matte laminated' (printers often say 'matte lam') i.e. a thin non-glossy, transparent plastic film is bonded on after printing and ink drying. You ask about precise quantification of the effect, however printers ...


4

Sticking to simple, pre-generated textures, you'll either have to allow some stretching, or allow some slightly awkward overlaps. I believe both ways will need some custom code though. Using stretching: Place corner caps, round the number of bubble tiles needed to fit in between up or down, and stretch (or shrink) that span to make up the difference: ...


4

I know you tagged your question with inkscape, but this is how I would do it with Illustrator. Maybe you can do the same in Inkscape, but I'm not all that familiar with it. In Illustrator: 1. Start with an arbitrarily colored rectangle 2. Apply a Stained Glass Texture to your rectangle Effect > Texture > Stained Glass... Adjust the settings as you see ...


4

JohnB's answer is definitely the best technique for Illustrator. Just in case, I thought of an alternative idea that you can use in any program. I found this cracked soil texture in CG Textures (category Soil, there a few similar ones): And adding a black and white filter and a Photoshop effect called Stamp, I ended up with this: Because it's a ...


4

Another indirect way would be to utilize GIMP's mosaic filter (Filters → Distorts → Mosaic) to produce a raster and then vectorize it. This method along with others is described in this mailing list exchange about the skin pattern of a turtle. Here's a pattern I quickly generated with this method: You can play around with the filter settings to achieve ...


4

In addition to Yisela's new answer, and in support of the fact that there are many ways to achieve this: I was able to achieve this by firstly releasing the clipping path you had applied to your texture image layer, then increasing opacity to 100% and changing the Blend Mode to Darker Color. I then duplicated the texture image layer and applied the Vivid ...


3

I guess this one is made by filters I am not sure but you can get similar effect using water paper filter filter > sketch > water paper just create your background of any color and then apply this filter. you can maximize the values(highlighted in red) as well to get your desired output. hope this will help


3

The first thing that came to mind for me was a fractured glass pattern. There are lots of images out there depicting it, but the trick would be to find a few good ones where there is no background imagery visible and where the pattern is fairly irregular. If you can find some like that, I think it might work well for this. You'd probably have to compose ...


3

I would suggest that with this line drawing you shouldn't try to give it any kind of realistic metallic look. Line drawing and realistic textures -- especially a 3D-ish embossing effect -- just don't belong together. Aim instead for an illustration look: flat colors roughly in the yellow/yellow-orange range. Brush in shadows with a soft-edge brush (make a ...


3

This is a bit lengthy, but not too difficult. Part 1: Creating the Pattern Create new file in Photoshop. Go to File > New... or press Ctrl+N, enter the values of 200px for Width and Height. Until otherwise indicated, we are working in this file. Fill the background with black. You can do this by pressing the D key to reset the selected foreground and ...


3

If I were to do this in the context of a user interface, and I had access to OS-level compositing, I would probably try to do this with a colored gradient, a repeatable grayscale leather/fabric texture which is "evenly lit" (no lighting effects) which I would overlay on top of the color with multiply. Finally, I would apply a stitching texture. This has the ...


3

Adding to what Luuk and Horatio suggest: If you want the lettering to look like it is on a rough surface (i.e., you want it to conform to the surface texture, at least somewhat), you would use the Displacement filter (Filter > Distort > Displace). This takes a bit of prep, but it's not arduous. Look at the RGB channels for your background texture, ...


3

In Photoshop, select the pixels that you want to use as your pattern. In the Edit menu, choose Define pattern... and you now have a pattern. When you select your paintbucket (g shortcut), you can now choose a pattern and your pattern will be selectable in the tool options. Patterns are awesome because if you create "seamless" patterns, you can ...


3

The sample you show looks photo-realistic to me. The reason you probably think it doesn't is not the wood texture itself, but the context: straight-on, no perspective, synthetic lighting etc. There is a concept, usually applied to robotics and CG animations of humans, which is referred to as the "uncanny valley." It is basically a threshold where a ...


3

If what you looking for is pseudo maps, look at this tutorial. You can record the steps and save them into an action for use later. However, this technique only works ok with some objects (such as a wooden plank etc). As these map types have very different purposes and require very different details in them to work properly on a 3D object, you will not be ...


3

Diffuse is best described as the raw color channel of a 3D object, a texture is a 2D image file that can be wrapped onto an object, usually by UV mapping. Often the texture node is plugged into the diffuse channel to create the color of the object (like wrapping a present), however you can also plug a texture into other channels like displacement, reflection ...


3

It's really a 3 tone effect. If you want to easily recreate it in photoshop or illustrator, follow these steps: Google search "Fee Vector Watercolor" or something similar Use 3 different brush vectors, or flip horizontally and vertically so all 3 of them have different edges, and align them very close to each other on the site you want the effect. Set the ...


3

Since you mention you will be working with one (big) piece, you could create your fractal manually in Illustrator or Photoshop. This will give you more freedom to alter shapes and colors. For PS, start by creating some guides to reference the center: From the center you've just created, add some vector shapes and merge (smart object in Photoshop): ...



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