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13

create your image. For example, let's say it's 200px square go to FILTERS > OTHER > OFFSET and type in x and y numbers that are half your image size (in this case 100px) this will shift your image over that many pixels and put the pixels that were moved off the canvas on to the other side. You now will see a seam running down the middle of your image where ...


10

Select all Choose Edit > Edit Colors > Recolor Artwork Click the Edit tab at the top Click the Link colors icon in the middle of the window Move the color wheel indicators or.... Set the sliders to Global Adjust and then adjust the sliders


5

Use the Slice Tool like this: Drag out a slice that encompasses the entire image. You want a "slice", in other words, that is the entire image. Right-click (Ctl-click with 1-button mouse on a Mac) and choose "Divide Slice" from the context menu. Select your slice sizes and click OK. (Note: you might consider choosing how many slices, rather than what size. ...


5

I found this that might be of help: Create rotated tileable patterns As you mention, there's math involved that is way beyond my understanding, so I'll only bring some of the principles that have to do with designing it. Basically, the 'solution' would be: Take an unrotated, tileable texture that repeats horizontally and vertically. Tile it to a large ...


5

Sticking to simple, pre-generated textures, you'll either have to allow some stretching, or allow some slightly awkward overlaps. I believe both ways will need some custom code though. Using stretching: Place corner caps, round the number of bubble tiles needed to fit in between up or down, and stretch (or shrink) that span to make up the difference: ...


4

Yes, you can do it in Gimp, but in my opinion is simpler with ImageMagick (see also here). You need to put a lot of guidelines where you need to cut: And then simply apply the Guillotine transform: After this, you have the original image split in a lot of imagettes: And you have to save - pardon, export - each of them with a proper name. Ok, maybe ...


4

I believe the answer to your question was first posted in a similar thread in regards to exporting patterns by Jin. In the pattern library popup, when you click on a pattern, the tooltip should tell you what dimension it is. Start a new document with this dimension, and fill using the pattern. You should end up with a non-repeated image of the ...


4

I have been finding some really great ones on http://subtlepatterns.com/. They're all free to use, provided you credit them somewhere.


3

This isn't quite a duplicate of this other question (although you don't state it in the question, your tags imply that you want to do this in Photoshop) but I can give the exact same answer: Is there a free software to split a PNG image into some smaller images? ImageMagick is great for doing things like this from command-line if you need to write batch ...


3

DA01 answers how to make it but your question is how to test it. The answer to that question is: Select your pattern layer Edit > Define Pattern Create New Layer Select All Edit > Fill > Pattern > Choose your pattern Hit okay and see if it looks good


2

Diagonal lines is definitely something that's a little more painful. But, I would recommend using similar techniques as to tiling photos. By using the offset feature you'll be easily able to tell if it tiles, if not adjust it. Alternatively, there are some great free resources on the web that will create tiles diagonals for you with a huge level of control, ...


2

Looks good is a very subjective description... I like to make connecting lines so the end result looks woven. I also keep keep colors to a minimum, typically just 2 or 3. Why don't you start by collecting a few samples that you like, then recreate them with a few small touches of your own?


2

I was going to say "you can't", but apparently it is possible: http://www.peteryu.ca/tutorials/gimp/rotate_tileable_patterns I'd rather not do all of that and come up with something else.


2

Here's a non-mathematical approach from when I've needed to do similar things: Make a massive area of the pattern (the tiles won't be small), rotate as desired. Choose a visually simple, distinctive spot (e.g. one corner of the X) Have a horizontal and vertical guide line run through that exact spot. Follow the horizontal line until you reach an exact ...


2

Although not a plugin, this is an ideal case for a Pattern in Illustrator. In your case it can be used to generate many copies of an object to be placed on a single page. From your description it sounds like you could be talking about making an image into a pattern. In Illustrator, it is actually possible to create patterns out of images. You'll want to ...


2

For Photoshop.... Create a selection around the upright bucket. Choose Edit > Define Pattern Create a new layer in the document you want the pattern applied to. Fill the new layer with any any color and then set the layer Fill opacity to zero Choose Layer > Layer Style > Pattern Overlay Select the bucket pattern you just defined, and click OK ...


2

I would use another tool, like "image magick", to "compile" your exported png into slices. For example : http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/crop/


1

You simply need to experiment with modes and opacity to get where you want to go... I, personally, would probably opt for the Color blending mode above Hue. Then simply adjust the opacity of the layer until you're happy.


1

The edge of the emboss filter is not wrapping around the edge of your tile. To get around this, tile your image into a much larger image by repeating the image (eg 3x3 tiles), run the emboss on the whole thing, and then crop back to the one centre tile again (not an edge tile).


1

I'd try stock sites like Shutterstock, with different searching keywords, for example If you need a whole set, probably you should work with some graphic/mobile designer directly.


1

Very easy way to test if images tile correctly with Tile View extension for Google Chrome.


1

There's a great (freeware for personal use) tool called AMP Tile Viewer that lets you very quickly check whether an image is tileable and how it will look tiled. I use it all the time and it works just great. No need to make patterns in Photoshop you will never use or have to delete afterwards.


1

There is also another way to do this, but the limit is that all the other patterns must be of the same size you will see why. Steps: Make a 200px by 200px box. Convert it into an smart object. Duplicate and align it so there are 3 boxes horizontally. Make sure no overlapping or spaces in between. Duplicate the three boxes selected into 3 vertical columns. ...


1

I traditionally save the image as a jpg or png and then use basic html to test the tiling. <html> <head></head> <body style="background: url(image.jpg) repeat 0 0;"> </body> </html> Open that in a browser and you can see the tiling and simply re-save "image.jpg" and refresh the web page to check revisions.


1

There are many tutorials for how to do this on the web. Here's a good one straight to the point.


1

Start with a square of document, make a texture. Make a new document the same size. Make a square selection exactly 1/2 the size of the square in each dimension (so 1/4 square). Copy the upper left quadrant and paste it into the new document, placing it as the lower right quadrant. Copy upper right quadrant and paste it into the new document, placing it ...



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