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EPS is a flat file format - something is either transparent or it is not - there's no in between. Blurs, shadows, and glows must be expanded and flattened when saved as EPS. In that heart image, the shadow is what is generating the background because it has to be flattened for the EPS format. You can try re-saving the as .ai then place into InDesign. ...


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Try a combination of adding a inner stroke of 1-2 px, inner glow of 1-2 px and a inner shadow that's 1-2 px. All dark. This will make the inner edges of your logo dark - hence mix itself better with the background. This is a fix that works with your dark background. If you need it for another colored background - make the effects in the same color. To make ...


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I like to create some shapes outside problematic area and changes the stroke/fill to background: Outside - Inside - Result (1 min work) -


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1) Select the Window menu at the top. 2) Select properties. 3) Under properties, change the background


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There are a few ways this could have been accomplished. For that particular piece, since the source files can be downloaded and examined, the darker areas are created, filled with a solid color and grouped. Then the blend mode is changed to Multiply for the group - via the Transparency Panel or Appearance Panel.


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Dead simple! Just put a layer above the logo layer with the colour (or texture) you want to apply to the logo layer below and set the opacity mode to screen and the edges will look nice and clean too. I second what the other guys are saying about leaning Inkscape however! EDIT: I just noticed that your original logo is dark grey rather than black so this ...


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The main problem in such an icon is the antialiasing zone between the black and the white. @ybeltukov approach with GIMP is correct. In order to proceed and clear the white zone you need to select it (by color or with the magic wand) and tweak a little e.g. increasing the selection by 1 pixel and feather the selection to avoid the pixeling effect visible in ...


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You can tweak color curves to obtain a smooth picture. Just increase the red component and decrease green and blue components: It is simple, but it is difficult to obtain the specified color exactly (#840a0c) as in @marcusdoesstuff's solution. Another (less accurate) possibility is to select only RGB channels (not alpha) and apply filling with the ...


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Basically to my understanding, when you select the image, select your interactive transparency tool. Apply to where you want it to be transparent, and then convert it to bitmap. But remember you can make it transparent countless times as long as you're converting it to bitmap after each apply.



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