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I'm adding my 2 cents. And the option you choose depends on the print technique and if you can interact with the printing house. 1) A transparency can be achived using a screen. The ink used will be your PANTONE 728 C but the plate will have your 10% pattern. This is used in lithography and offset printing for example. 2) A transparency can be actual ...


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As indicated in your second link..... Set the swoosh to a 10% tint of Pantone 728 and then set it to overprint. Same essential appearance, no transparency. Overprinting allows ink underneath to bleed through what's printed over it. Overprinting will allow color to build up in areas to a maximum of 100% of a color. XX% opacity = XX% tint + overprinting I ...


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To remove an overlay of grey to an alpha channel as is the case of the example we have to remove the alpha channel (Layer > Transparency > Remove Alpha Channel) first. We then can convert the background gray back to alpha by choosing Layer > Transparency > Color to Alpha. In the window that opens click on the color bar (defaults to white) to open the ...


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Photoshop GUI is a bit unproductive for this problem. The data is there, its just extremely hidden*. The straight color can be read though its just a bit convoluted. If you need this often for whatever purpose record following action (I need this pretty often for 3D work): Preparation Hide layers you don't want flatten for straight color. --Start ...


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Actually it is a more interesting question that I originally thought. I made some tests. Yes it mesures 127 on all channels. I thought it was gray but when I saw the levels on that layer it is actually black. I think there is no way to change opacity to 200%. The workarround is to duplicate this layer several times and combine them. The first time the ...


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Getting the RGB value of a pixel should be easy, but it isn't because Photoshop premultiplies the alpha as layer transparency, and does not let you access the RGB channels without the transparency applied. I can think of a few techniques to get there, an easy one is to use Flaming Pear's Solidify-B plugin (free). For clarity, Solidify-B attempts to fill the ...


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Unless the pixel you are looking at is on its own layer, it is impossible to tell whether the colour was applied as a low-opacity "pure" colour or a full-opacity mixed colour. In your example, a pixel that was the result of using 50% opacity black on a white background is identical to a pixel that resulted from applying 50% grey (or, rather, (128,128,128)) ...


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If you need eaxctly what you get when exporting to gif, then just flatten image. Layer->Flatten Image. If you want to make 100% black from your gray brush stroke on new layer: 1. Select layer with brush stroke 2. Go Select -> Color Range... 3. Click with color sampler on your brush stroke and adjust selection level with Fuzziness slider. Click Ok. 4. Make ...


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Unfortunately Illustrator cannot distinguish between transparent and white when tracing. But there is a workaround: set your transparent areas to a solid key colour, and after tracing, delete the key colour. Here's how: With your artwork in Photoshop, create a solid colour behind the artwork to be traced (with Layer > New Fill Layer > Solid Color ...


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It's not a blend mode. Multiply, for example, gives you this: You'll want to do as @Scott suggested and create 3 shapes, the intersecting shape being the colour of your choice. For example, create two circle shape layers, then copy both circles into a third layer and then intersect:


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Are you trying to get the two circles to overlap and produce the combined colour in the overlap? If so I would create two layers, with different coloured circles on each. Then overlap them how you would like, and set the blending mode for the top circle to "multiply" to get the effect you are after. Example of this is below:


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Ok, let's try to write an answer... 0. Some technical background Many image file formats can actually preserve the color values of transparent pixels. PNG, TIFF, TGA, BMP are among them, as well as the working formats of most (or more likely all) serious image manipulation applications. You can think of pixels as being colored and transparent according to ...


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Adding a background layer is a nice way to try different backgrounds. The more boring way would be to set the transparency style in the display preferences, "[...] either to a different type of checkerboard, or to solid black, white, or gray": http://docs.gimp.org/2.8/en/gimp-pimping.html#gimp-prefs-display


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Yes, that would be very easy, I just opened up Gimp 2 my self and tried it out to make sure! :p Anyway, in the layers panel, right click and choose New Layer. Then make sure you select White for the Layer Fill Type. Now, click OK and move the new white layer to the bottom of all the current layers. To change the layer color, select it and just paint ...


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This effect can be achieved by using Layer Masks 1) Draw a circle 2) Then place your text inside the circle on another layer 3) Ctrl + Click on the text layer to get selection around it 4) Keep the selection and Just click on the Circle layer in the layers panel to select the layer 5) Inverse your selection and then click on the Mask Icon in the layers ...


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It's basically 2 layers... Your shape with text The photo To create the shape layer you just create a layer of whatever you want then add a mask to the layer to remove pieces you do not want. For example.... I've created a layer with a circle. Then set that layer to 50% opacity. I then created a text layer. I Ctrl/Command-clicked the text layer ...


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The Pathfinder is your friend, for things like this. Starting with my two paths (rectangle and star). Make sure the object that you want to punch out is on top of the object you want to make the hole in. Open your Pathfinder (Window > Pathfinder). I like to keep mine pinned to the toolbar on the right, because it gets used a lot. Make sure that both ...


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Select your text then Create Outline (shortcut: Shift + Cmd/Ctrl + O) Select the text and the bag then Make Compound Path (shortcut: Cmd/Ctrl + 8) Edit Based on your comment it should be working, if you got step 1 to work, so the issue would have to be in your bag's construction. Here's how a very quick mock up looks: Here's the text after performing ...


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This doesn't explain why it's occurring but the following two workarounds helped to some degree, but neither are ideal: • Save .ai as an EPS (although then there was white outlines around things like a low resolution/transparency flattening type effect) • Save .ai as a high resolution JPEG


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Possible problem one This is caused by a pretty central concept that does sometimes crop up. It more commonly a problem in video production but its also good to know when isolating objects form background. There is no such thing as a transparent pixel. There is only a color and how transparent that pixel is. When you cut color out to form the alpha its ...


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I had a similar issue some time back. I noticed that I was exporting the PNGs from Adobe Photoshop without going in detail to the advanced setting. Later, I tried using the PSD instead of PNG and it worked perfectly okay. I will have to check the layer mask thing if similar issue comes up.


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It is likely that these files are different since being created in different programs. It doesn't appear that one is "wrong" as such (I'll explain that later). It just seems to be a way that PNGs work and how they clash with PDFs. Different programs have different default settings and some must just add a black background. In Photoshop, using Layer > Layer ...



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