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113

At its core, There isn't really anything wrong with Comic Sans. It was designed for a purpose - comic-book-style speech bubbles primarily. It did a good job at that - if you're going to have Microsoft Bob talk to you on a screen, Comic Sans feels more 'right' than Times New Roman. Three things have contributed to Comic Sans' unpopularity, in my view. ...


93

There are technical, compatibility, legal, authenticity, and subjective reasons for not using it. I'm going to go through each in turn listing out the reasons with examples and references. Starting with: Hitler freaks out over Comic Sans Technical Reasons There are a handful of purely technical reasons not to use it. The first, was a lack of italic ...


32

Comic Sans is a poorly made font because it succeeds neither at resembling actual comic book handwriting, nor printed lettering. For comparison, here is a well designed comic book font called Crimefighter BB. The above example is italicized and all caps, so while a great font for comics, it is not exactly all-purpose. But there are plenty of other great ...


25

I think Helvetica's biggest strength (and thus is greatest weakness) is just how "neutral" of a typeface it is. It really can work well in all sorts of situations and applications because of how balanced and neutral it is. But by the same token, it becomes "bland" - the office beige color of typefaces. I would never say Helvetica is superior to any other ...


23

As far as the difference goes, you are right. There are some character which are slightly different however the difference goes way beyond just the comparison of the character. Here is some explanation on ilovetypography Here is a site which shows you how to spot the difference on awayback Helvetica vs. Arial, and includes amongst other things this helpful ...


19

Serif Vs Sans Serif (a picture speaks a thousand words) Read @Calvin's answer for explanation.


19

How you write is like how you dress. It's not about practicality, it's about how you present yourself. It reflects how much thought and effort you put into your appearance. It strongly influences your audience's first impression before you even open your mouth, and it colors what you have to say throughout the presentation. In this metaphor, Futura would be ...


17

While this is primarily a list of sites, know that browsing a website is not the only way to look for typefaces. Some type foundries still publish specimen catalogs, and some now have mobile apps and Adobe plugins. Many will also have e-mail newsletters to update on new things. Myfonts.com Fontfont.com Typophile.com Letterheadfonts.com Linotype.com ...


15

There's nothing wrong using Comic Sans when it's appropriate: for comics (duh), informal publications, and applications targeted towards children. It's meant to have both legible and handwritten attributes. Here are two completely legitimate examples: Since it's a font that comes packaged with Windows and the majority of users don't download or install ...


15

Objectively you've already mostly answered it in your question: neutral In that it's 'plain' and not overly decorated, this is certainly true. Helvetica in a lot of situations doesn't impart any additional meaning (intentional or otherwise) beyond the words it is forming. well-glyphed I'm not sure I've heard that particular term before, but I ...


14

Serifs are the usually perpendicular projections found on the termini/endpoints in type. For instance, a capital "I" is usually rendered with 2 crossbars. Those are serifs. Sans-serif just means "without serif." The definition of serif / sans-serif typefaces should be self-explanatory. Another name for serif is "roman"; likewise, sans-serif typefaces may ...


14

They're almost interchangeable - but there's a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type's appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


12

Using Comic Sans in your Powerpoint presentation at a TED Talk is the equivalent of wearing a Sponge Bob T-Shirt and a pair of sweat pants while giving your Powerpoint presentation. There's nothing wrong with a cartoon t-shirt and pair of sweat pants. They are comfortable. Versatile. Affordable. But simply 'say' the wrong thing for a TED talk. When people ...


12

Typefaces become popular for a number of reasons, partly technology (which often drives fashion -- "Because I can" is a more potent driver than most people realize), partly the cultural milieu within which they fit and become associated, partly the mood they invoke (or don't). The grotesks in general arrived on the typographic scene at a time when Western ...


11

NO, no, no, no, no. Double spaces are never necessary when using proportional fonts. Not if your sentences are one word each, two words each, two paragraphs each, or six pages long. The best way to typeset those two exact sentences in a proportional font is correctly: with one space after the period. Two spaces just makes my eye trip. Genuinely. I feel ...


10

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


9

I think upper & lower R, S, O & lower-case g & f are good to start with. R will give you a good start for what the serifs (if you are doing serifs) will look like for straight & slanted letters (eg, T, X, A, etc). A good beginning for B as well. S obviously a good start to B, while also showing you all the curves. O gives way to Q, C, G ...


9

atif089's and Calvin Huang's answers illustrate the main differences quite well. For the usage, my general rule of thumb is: Serifs for horizontal-intensive reading. Serifs help the eye to stay on the line while reading, and thus can make reading faster and more effortless. Sans-serifs for vertical-intensive scanning. Without the serifs, it is easier to ...


9

Ok, three things: Single spaces after periods is recommended in the AP Stylebook, the Modern Language Association style guide and the Chicago Manual of Style. Go with that. Nothing is more distracting than something that looks like a grammar error, so single spacing is your best bet. That said, consistency is king. If you use double spaces after periods, ...


9

So, my question is: Does the difference between a 'font' and a 'typeface' subside in the language? Or are font and typeface now used interchangeably even by pros? Well, the two are still different. The simplest possible way of describing the difference is thus: You use a font to generate letters in a given typeface. By "font" we usually now mean a ...


9

It's called a bridge. Source: Stencil on Wikipedia


9

Comic Sans MS scores extremely well in readability, particularly for educational content (like Higgs-Boson announcement): Fortune favors the bold (and the Italicized): Effects of disfluency on educational outcomes Which Fonts Do Children Prefer to Read Online? Only designers really take issue with Comic Sans MS because of how it is designed breaking ...


8

Summed up into a couple of points, here are my thoughts on the subject. "Readability" is also about what we are most familiar with. English speakers tend to be familiar with both serif and sans-serif typefaces, enough to be able to read both extremely fluently. You could say that most of our most lengthy reading (eg, novels, newspapers) uses ...


8

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


7

I got interested in the question (I don't design type, I just design with it), asked around folks that do, and did some research. There doesn't seem to be a consensus -- every designer works with his/her own natural creative process, and many start with a sketched idea that could be any letter or a combination. Here are some interviews from ...


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


7

There are two anwsers I can think of. First: it's not about being good or bad per se. Black text on dark blue background for example is bad because it's hard if not impossible to read. Comic Sans is not unreadable (as other answers have explained, it actually scores quite well on readability). What it is: overused. The same goes for the default powerpoint ...


7

I think that this is exact question is answered very well by the documentary on the font that came out in 2007. It has been a while since I have seen it, but the part I remember most goes over how Helvetica became associated with modern design at the time of it's introduction. It talks about many other reasons as well: readability, compactness... This ...


6

I've found this flowchart very helpful in selecting decent typefaces for various projects.


6

Something like this? to quote from the link: You can make any active font the default font in the document by first making sure that's nothing's selected in your document (Command-Shift-A/Ctrl-Shift-A), then choosing the font you want from the Type > Font submenu or in the Character palette. All new text frames you create from then on in the ...



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