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21

As far as the difference goes, you are right. There are some character which are slightly different however the difference goes way beyond just the comparison of the character. Here is some explanation on ilovetypography Here is a site which shows you how to spot the difference on awayback Helvetica vs. Arial, and includes amongst other things this helpful ...


19

Serif Vs Sans Serif (a picture speaks a thousand words) Read @Calvin's answer for explanation.


17

While this is primarily a list of sites, know that browsing a website is not the only way to look for typefaces. Some type foundries still publish specimen catalogs, and some now have mobile apps and Adobe plugins. Many will also have e-mail newsletters to update on new things. Myfonts.com Fontfont.com Typophile.com Letterheadfonts.com Linotype.com ...


14

Serifs are the usually perpendicular projections found on the termini/endpoints in type. For instance, a capital "I" is usually rendered with 2 crossbars. Those are serifs. Sans-serif just means "without serif." The definition of serif / sans-serif typefaces should be self-explanatory. Another name for serif is "roman"; likewise, sans-serif typefaces may ...


14

They're almost interchangeable - but there's a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type's appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


11

NO, no, no, no, no. Double spaces are never necessary when using proportional fonts. Not if your sentences are one word each, two words each, two paragraphs each, or six pages long. The best way to typeset those two exact sentences in a proportional font is correctly: with one space after the period. Two spaces just makes my eye trip. Genuinely. I feel ...


9

atif089's and Calvin Huang's answers illustrate the main differences quite well. For the usage, my general rule of thumb is: Serifs for horizontal-intensive reading. Serifs help the eye to stay on the line while reading, and thus can make reading faster and more effortless. Sans-serifs for vertical-intensive scanning. Without the serifs, it is easier to ...


9

Ok, three things: Single spaces after periods is recommended in the AP Stylebook, the Modern Language Association style guide and the Chicago Manual of Style. Go with that. Nothing is more distracting than something that looks like a grammar error, so single spacing is your best bet. That said, consistency is king. If you use double spaces after periods, ...


9

So, my question is: Does the difference between a 'font' and a 'typeface' subside in the language? Or are font and typeface now used interchangeably even by pros? Well, the two are still different. The simplest possible way of describing the difference is thus: You use a font to generate letters in a given typeface. By "font" we usually now mean a ...


9

It's called a bridge. Source: Stencil on Wikipedia


8

I think upper & lower R, S, O & lower-case g & f are good to start with. R will give you a good start for what the serifs (if you are doing serifs) will look like for straight & slanted letters (eg, T, X, A, etc). A good beginning for B as well. S obviously a good start to B, while also showing you all the curves. O gives way to Q, C, G ...


7

I've found this flowchart very helpful in selecting decent typefaces for various projects.


7

Summed up into a couple of points, here are my thoughts on the subject. "Readability" is also about what we are most familiar with. English speakers tend to be familiar with both serif and sans-serif typefaces, enough to be able to read both extremely fluently. You could say that most of our most lengthy reading (eg, novels, newspapers) uses ...


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


6

I got interested in the question (I don't design type, I just design with it), asked around folks that do, and did some research. There doesn't seem to be a consensus -- every designer works with his/her own natural creative process, and many start with a sketched idea that could be any letter or a combination. Here are some interviews from ...


6

Something like this? to quote from the link: You can make any active font the default font in the document by first making sure that's nothing's selected in your document (Command-Shift-A/Ctrl-Shift-A), then choosing the font you want from the Type > Font submenu or in the Character palette. All new text frames you create from then on in the ...


6

Not exactly an answer on "where to go to find fonts", Scott has mentioned the best places to do that, but in my experience it's great to also start from history. A good book on typography (one of my favorites and excellent if you are new to the subject is Just my Type by Simon Garfield) can give you a solid foundation on how typefaces have been developing ...


6

In general, from a strictly technical perspective, the answer would involve making outlines of the font in Illustrator or another vector program, putting those into a new font file (I use FontForge to make fonts), and then adding the characters you need. In your case, perhaps you could find some way to make Trajan work with Sell Your Soul, since the font ...


6

All the images seem to come from the same source mostly GearedBull (Jim Hood) user on Wikipedia. It is a type specimen although quite smalll compared to standard specimens. To me, it just looks like someone took the time to make these images for Wikipedia. I doubt you could easily edit the file since the font is probably in outlines but you can gather some ...


6

Things to consider: Larger inner margin not outer. A larger inner margin helps prevent text from being crammed into the gutter of the spine. If you don't leave ample margin for the inner side you may find it gets difficult to read text near the gutter with every additional page. Creep. Creep happens when books are bound. Each signature needs to be slightly ...


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


6

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


6

Teaching her the names of the different parts might not work, it really depends how much she loves letters. You could probably try some basic script writing if she can already manage some writing. I'm sure there are books to practice that but I can't name any off the top of my head. Try to tie typography with things she already likes a lot. I heard of a ...


5

As KMSTR states, the idea of a "bold" typeface has its own channel of history. A blackletter in contrast to a Roman font would certainly appear bold, and chunky lettering goes back much further than either of those styles. But in checking out this thread, the consensus seems to be that Clarendon is the first bold typeface that was made to complement a ...


5

I am not sure if there is a term of art for the second one (there might be). I would refer to it as "nesting." It is a style that was quite common around 1890-1920, especially Art Nouveau


5

Historically/traditionally it's called the colophon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colophon_%28publishing%29 From the article: […] With the development of the private press movement from around 1890, colophons became conventional in private press books, and often included a good deal of additional information on the book, including statements of ...


5

English is NOT the best-constructed language. It's a mess of etymological influences, irregular verb conjugation, homonyms, and there are just exceptions everywhere. I'm sure people could successfully make the case that Spanish or Esperanto or whatever is not only a better candidate for lingua franca status because of the ability to learn it quickly and ...


5

Not to detract from lawndartcatcher's answer, which is correct, there are a couple of important caveats with regard to changing the default font. The big one is, don't ever change the [Basic Paragraph] style to your other font. If someone else opens your document in their copy of InDesign, all your "[Basic Paragraph]" text will be converted to their [Basic ...


5

Perhaps a slightly oblique answer, but I recommend you buy The Non-Designer's Design and Type Book by Robin Williams. There is no better resource, and you'll find all the answers you need to get you rolling, both for typography and layout. This is especially true for the "instructions on how to use these typefaces" -- that's a book length answer ...


5

There is no real difference. You are only using different techniques to reproduce the typeface's glyphs. It's the reproduced result which is the legal focus, not the technique used to reproduce it. What requirements exists depends on the font and the author (you find free fonts that you can use commercially, and others that comes with a very strict ...



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