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Ok, I'll answer as a font designer: I think you need to have the font designed or design it to meet your requirements. In the image you are submitting of what you're looking for, the lowercase "g" and "y" (etc) are not typographically "correct", meaning, they do not respect typographical conventions for lowercase letters and are not pleasing to the eye of ...


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Typeface design evolves, among other things, to match the changing materials on which we write. Chiselled inscriptions on Roman columns required different typefaces to hand-written mediaeval manuscripts; the invention of the printing press required new kinds of typefaces, as did the first dot-matrix printers and "video terminals". A lot of the standard ...


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The easy answer has already been given - that no - it will never ever stop. There are countless reasons given - but there's never a new idea, etc - refer to joojaa's answer. I think we have to consider the right-brain, left-brain duality to this question, however. Someone creative would say no, but someone logical would say yes. As an engineer in the ...


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This is a great question. Sometimes when an outsider enters a new culture they assume everyone looks the same. But as they get to know that culture they find out that each individual in that culture is completely unique. The same is true when it comes to typography. Many people, when they first look at Arial and Helvetica for example, think they are ...


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Yes, experts say around 2043 we'll hit 'peak typeface' and production will drop precariously. Oh, they'll still find deposits of original typeface ideas scattered here and there across the planet, but we can safely assume that for all intents and purposes, that's it. This is all the type we'll ever find. At that point, the graphic design industry will ...


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Ultimately a typeface is a representation of an individual or organization's creative vision for displaying commonly accepted symbols representing written human communication - and there's an almost infinite potential when you include human creativity. And we tend to like to relearn the same lessons our own way - meaning some aspiring designer will recreate ...


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It is not really going to stop (but the reason is not nesseserily design per se). The reason you have many similar different manufacturers of same looking font is same as why you have lots of manufacturers of subtly different nails. Ownership is defined in this case as copyright, so if you wanted a font that is subtly different, you need a entirely new ...


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First, I would not recommend providing 50 variations for font choices because that would cause too many issues. I think it would be best to only provide 5 choices at max. For web To answer your question if this is going to become a common practice for you would I consider an HTML page you could call on the image and have your fonts displayed and you ...


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Most font management software have this functionality. For example I am using NexusFont and it can do this. Off course not a hard thing to do with Photoshop either. A word of warning, not many people really enjoy shifting 50 fonts. Ive occasionally experimented with peoples sensibilities by giving THEM the choice. And most of the time they get shocked when ...



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