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If you're a beginner, I actually DO recommend you start out with something simpler and cheaper. Fontlab and Glyphs are awesome programs, but they're also expensive and have loads and loads of features you might not need at the moment. Some lower-budget but competent font editors: FontForge- more than competent, free, open source, multiplatform. Can be ...


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Is there anything more reliable than a common web search plus the word "font" (or whatever your product will be)? Not really. You can outsource the work to some 3rd party that can do this for you. There is no central authority that can give you this info. Even exhaustive searches do not save you on a global scale. If web search is not good enough for ...


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With Typophile offline, and all signs point to that being permanent, I would recommend visiting "Phinney on Fonts". That is Thomas Phinney, type designer and enthusiast and president of FontLab. His site features some great tutorials, links to other important sites, lists of must-have books on the subject, and more. He is also a member here at the Graphic ...


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Here are some more examples, not sure if these fonts work well for your purpose which seems to be a programming environment.


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You get good differentiation with monospace fonts that have elongated ascenders for the lowercase 'L'. This also helps separating the lowercase 'L' from the uppercase 'i'. Here's an example from the superb Nitti by the Dutch typefoundry Bold Monday. Edit: Sorry this should be a comment, not an answer…


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A typeface is one specific style of lettering: Times, Helvetica, Poetica, Adobe Garamond. Sometimes there is just one typeface to that name, period: Michelangelo, Caliban, Harrington. Since in most programs you have the ability to add formatting to a typeface (like bold or italic), and in layout progams you want aesthetic flexibility, type designers have ...


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Often slight differences between terms are missed when starting out. Some terms are mis-used, and some are misunderstood. I like to use an analogy or a metaphor to help distinguish between similar terms. If I'm lucky, the analogy holds and the answer helps make things clearer Type designers will sometimes make different weights (stroke thicknesses), style ...



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