Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

If you have the font on your machine to make the letter but didn't pay for it, then installing the font was your infringement. But there is no copyright protection on the shape of letters: Under U.S. law, typefaces and the letter forms or glyphs they comprise are considered to be utilitarian objects whose utility outweighs any merit that may exist in ...


3

Most typefaces are sold as an entire set, so yes, you'd need to purchase the entire typeface. In the grand scheme of things, a typeface shouldn't be a make it or break it part of the budget. It's just yet another tool that you'd be using to produce the final product. All that said, there are alternatives. For instance, House Industries' PhotoLettering ...


1

If you are designing the logo to be used publicly, as part of corporate identity, on stationery, signage, the website... yes.


1

You would need specific software to make an actually usable and quality font. I don't think that anyone that's serious about fonts uses anything else than FontLab or Glyphs on OSX. And to get help creating a really good font I'd suggest joining a great forum like Typophile. There are many experts and world renown typographers there that give practical ...


0

The best way to teach a small child typography is by trying (well, the best way to teach a small child anything is by trying). He writes a B-day party invitation? Let's make it a good exercise: Let him write it, see what he doesn't like about it, make him make it better. Children are very good in imagination and they are creative: If he knows to use ...


0

Although I understand everyone's thoughts of going with the second version, I would not. Engravers Gothic is too widely used in luxury brand identities (Marc Jacobs, Acqua de Parma – to name a few)…thereby making it less unique. If you would like your brand to stand out among the rest, I would go with number 1.


7

It's unfortunate that Khaled hasn't had a chance to respond here, but I'll give you my typographer response. As a general principle, I would strongly recommend sticking with the typographic conventions of each culture. Distorting letterforms (or choosing unusual typefaces that don't convey the same sense of formality as small caps do in English) is ...


4

There is no formal name for x-height numerals. In some OpenType fonts there are denominator numerals, normally used for fractions. I recall noticing one -- don't recall off-hand -- where these were close to the x-height of the typeface, but that's very unusual. If you need lining figures at small cap height, reduce the size of the numerals and increase the ...


4

I sort of fixed it by changing the display method in Photoshop. I had anti aliasing method set to 'crisp' I changed it 'sharp' (or vice versa) and it cleaned it up.


4

Rather than typography, which is many levels of understanding removed from the basic idea of letters-as-symbols-for-sounds, teach her the basics of calligraphy, from which all typography is derived, after all. We learn, and (hopefully) teach, any subject using gradients of understanding; reading and writing are no exception. If a child doesn't grasp the ...


6

Teaching her the names of the different parts might not work, it really depends how much she loves letters. You could probably try some basic script writing if she can already manage some writing. I'm sure there are books to practice that but I can't name any off the top of my head. Try to tie typography with things she already likes a lot. I heard of a ...


5

This can happen when the type is used at sizes not supported in the hinting. It's essentially a display error. When you print it's gone. Even exporting to PNG or jpeg will fix it in some cases. Other than that, the only fix is more complete hinting.


5

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


0

I like the first one, it has more of a classic feel and the "PARIS" just looks like luxury. The second ones horizontal scale seems too wide, especially in the A and S.


2

I would say the first font is better for a fashion brand because it is thinner and more angular. These things give it a great feminine distinction and make it more appealing to that audience. It also has the advantage of being bolder and will stand out better when inverted to white against color and will stand off print material well when black.


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.



Top 50 recent answers are included