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5

My understanding is No. The page view cap is there to gain further money for Adobe if you need more page views. It has absolutely nothing to do with bandwidth or foundry licensing. Adobe has plenty of servers and bandwidth to serve everything and they are the foundry. Adobe would see embedding a Typekit font, with anything other than their own embed code, ...


4

Std - Standard or the base weight/form(s) of the typeface - often includes 1 regular or medium face, 1 bold face, then associated italics - good for any use Display - Generally refers to a typeface designed for use in headlines or display areas. Not widely used for large areas of text due to low readability/legibility at smaller sizes. (These include, but ...


4

Another option that's more flexible than either of those is using @font-face. It's free, and you can use whatever font you want. Just have to upload the font to wherever the site's hosted and specify it in the css. Only thing is you have to convert the font format to be compatible with different browsers. Here's an example - say you want to use the ...


3

In short, two good rules of thumb: Don't use a font professionally without knowing what the license is. Assume a font has a license and go find it. IANAL. From a legal standpoint, fonts are treated like software when it comes to licensing. That's why I can't e-mail you a Helvetica font file, but I can create a line of text with your name on it, outline ...


3

I did some more research on licensing and came across the following: Can I use Typekit web fonts for anything other than a website? No. Our web font license requires that the fonts be added to a website with the Typekit embed code. If the website or web app is viewed in the browser (either on the desktop or on a mobile device), it's covered by ...


3

I'd go with a classic Helvetica/Garamond blend - it's a proven classic. For a quick look at combos that work, I typically use http://bonfx.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/19-top-fonts-in-19-top-combinations-chart.pdf If you are looking to build your unique combination I can recommend reading: ...


3

First, are you happy with the type selections and the character spacing of fonts on Google Web Fonts? I haven't used them yet, although I have seen at least one or two sites with excellent results using them. At the same time, some of the displays of their fonts show poor letterfit (mostly too much space between letters). If you need to match to Adobe ...


2

In terms of technology they are pretty much the same. In terms of product, they differ in that Google is focusing on open source offerings (no cost) while Typekit is focusing on commercial type licensing. The decision as to which to use would really come down to which typeface you want to use. Note that a lot of foundries and type distributors are now ...


2

if I have a font on my computer that doesn't say "Non-commercial use only" or something like that can I put it on web without a problem? Unfortunately not. Web embedding is one use for which you'd need a separate, specific license. Why? Most times when you use a font, as long as you have the font file on your computer legally and are using it ...


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According to this very interesting article, one of the issues between Photoshop kerning and CSS kerning is that Photoshop doesn't show the unit used for the letter spacing setting. The value is based on the font-size, and the article's author claims to have found that a value in Photoshop of 1000 is equal to 1em in CSS. X / 1000 = Y Where X is the ...


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You should also check out webfonts.fonts.com as they have a tremendous selection of web fonts as well. They also carry many of the top branding fonts that brands use like Helvetica, Avenir, Univers, Frutiger and many more. They also carry many third party foundry fonts too. Check it out!



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