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54

It Started Curved The apostrophe first appeared in the printed universe in Italy, 16th century, as a curved shape to signify elision copied from handwritten classical Italian poetry. The apostrophe was equivalent to our "Gotchas" or "Wannas" in the sense that it was a way to take the stiffness of the text away by making it sound more human-like. Here is an ...


52

In many fonts you will indeed find hardly any difference between using the Unicode characters for Roman numerals and just composing them from stardard Latin letters. For example, the following shows Louis VII (top) and Louis Ⅶ (bottom, using codepoints for Roman numerals) rendered with FreeSans: Apart from a tiny difference in spacing, which was propably ...


36

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


31

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


27

Technical documents will have a deeply nested, hierarchical structure, and also make use of footnotes, different types of emphasis, cross-referencing, pull outs and side bars of one sort of another and captions. The main distinguishing feature of technical documents tends to be complex structure. For headings, you can use any reasonably legible font; this ...


22

TL;DR The Unicode consortium recommends using the latin letter where possible and not the numeral, which where included for compatibility with East-Asian typography. The full story : (with justification of the above assertion) Unless you are doing some East-Asian typography, using the (non-archaic) Roman numeral characters from unicode (U+2160 — U+217F) is ...


20

Fifteen Centuries of Versals There are many ways to indicate the beginning (or resumption) of a section of text, including paragraph indents, blank lines, changing the weight or style of the opening part of the text, ornamentation like fleurons — and versals, a category that includes drop caps. A Manuscript Example Versals, also known as lettrines, ...


19

Did a bit of research to make sure, but in general "proper" typography doesn't use straight quotes, single or double. Here's a handy guide for the commands and HTML entities for single/double curly quotes. Typewriters are also responsible for the introduction of ‘straight quotes’, non-specific quote marks designed as a space-saving measure for the ...


18

Technical documents are often set in sans-serif. There are a couple of reasons why this is preferred over its serif counterpart: Serif typefaces are usually designed to be as transparent to the reader as possible. In a novel, reading should be a fluid activity, and the typeface must not call attention to itself. Technical documents are often filled with ...


15

Robert Bringhurst's Elements of Typographic Style is a thorough and wonderful reference for things like this. It's long but very valuable. A lot of designers recommend a standard grid of lines so that a line+padding will always fit within, say, 16 pixels. So anything less than that would have a line height of 16, everything above that would have line height ...


13

I remember struggling with this in CS3. I think the same fix will still apply in CS5. So here's what to do... First you create the type as you did in your example. You should see 3 small stripes outside of your circle. ( 2 with a small square on it, and 1 without the square) These are just indicators for where the text starts and ends grab the ...


13

I think the "Gothic" and "Mincho" styles are mixed quite often, even in magazines/newspaper-like publications, like sans-serif and serif fonts are mixed in Western publications. Ads have all sorts of different typography, and Mincho is always the type for all situations, like Times. So of course there are Kaku/Maru fonts mixed with Mincho. How fortunate such ...


13

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


11

I have the answer for French typography (and one of the nobiliary particles you quote is French, so…): the spaces preceding and following nobiliary particles should be regular spaces (the canonical reference being the Lexique des règles typographiques en usage à l'Imprimerie Nationale). I don't know if it holds in other languages, including English, but it ...


11

The Unicode Standard comments on U+2019 (’): this is the preferred character to use for apostrophe As far as what is right encoding-wise, I cannot think of a higher authority. Also, the typographical conventions of most languages do not use U+2019 for other purposes or only as secondary quotation marks. In fact, British English is the only major ...


10

"The Complete Manual of Typography" by James Felici has sections on French, Spanish and Italian typographic conventions. They probably cover most of the important points. There is also a good discussion of the differences between American and British conventions. The book is available as a PDF from Amazon and the publisher.


10

From a perspective of how it looks there may not be much of a difference. So if you publish only printed material then no difference, except in some fonts as Wrzlprmft points out in his excellent answer. Semantics are important The semantic difference is huge. By using roman numerals it makes it blatantly clear that you're talking of the number 5 instead ...


9

Ideally, nothing. Instead, use the actual content. Content is integral to a successful design, but, alas, even today, it's still treated like an afterthought all-to-often. Otherwise, Lorem ipsum is pretty much the habit.


9

Yeah - that'll work. http://www.lipsum.com/ is what I usually use.


8

For German and English typesetting, there is 'Zweisprachige Mikrotypografie' by Amelie Solbrig available for free. It's an introduction to typesetting and a compilation of German and English typesetting rules. It also comprises interviews with industry practitioners. For a student, it beats the shamelessly overpriced 'Detailtypografie' by Forssman & de ...


8

I love LaTeX. That said, I've had great success using InDesign for professional quality typesetting with minimal effort. This is especially the case when I'm working with others since -- as you've noticed -- designers with LaTeX skills are approaching unicorn territory. If you've never used InDesign before it might not immediately qualify for your criteria ...


8

This is the second time I see a Stack Exchange question on the usage of special quotation marks in philosophical literature, the first time being this question about p- and d-shaped quotation marks in a work by Carnap. During my research for this question I found another philosophical work, which uses ⌜-, ⌝-, m-, M-shaped quotation marks itself and ...


7

I've found this flowchart very helpful in selecting decent typefaces for various projects.


7

This history is not for you its for others who also somewhere want to know about lorem ipsum incase From Wikipedia: Lorem Ipsum commonly used to demonstrate the graphic elements of a document or visual presentation, such as font, typography, and layout. The lorem ipsum text is typically a section of a Latin text by Cicero with words altered. Even ...


7

If you can properly embed the fonts, then yes, you could just create the PDF directly from Word. InDesign is a much more robust page layout product, and offers a designer a much broader set of typographic and page layout tools with plenty of fine-tuning, but if you're find with the Word version, then technically, you can just convert that to the PDF you ...


7

For technical documents (or any other type) I have found the 'So You Need A Typeface' document to be very useful. It started out as a little bit of a joke around here, but it's actually incredibly useful. I've got a blown-up copy of it hanging on my wall. Link 1 Link 2


7

Just by looking at the final page layout? I don't think there's really any easy way to tell in most cases regardless of the type of publication. I think that if a layout engine has been refined to produce good layouts and a human has cleaned up the results (i.e., Xtags with QuarkXpress), then it would be all but impossible to tell. Science and math ...


7

In German language the rule is very simple: If the footnote or endnote refers to a single word, the footnote sign must directly follow the word. So your note [1] and [2] refers only to the words "amet" and "aliqua". If the footnote or endnote refers to a complete sentence the footnote sign must directly follow the punctuation of the sentence. So your note ...


7

As it often goes with these things, the answer will be subjective. Here are some thoughts, though: I think I tend to go without a space unless I'm worried about things flowing to multiple lines. Perhaps context could help you decide. Maybe 'Download/Print PDF' carries a connotation of 'Download PDF and Print PDF' while 'Download / Print PDF' says 'Download ...


7

In some cases it can be as simple as choosing Type > Type on a Path > Type on a Path options... and then ticking the Flip box.



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