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16

Technical documents are often set in sans-serif. There are a couple of reasons why this is preferred over its serif counterpart: Serif typefaces are usually designed to be as transparent to the reader as possible. In a novel, reading should be a fluid activity, and the typeface must not call attention to itself. Technical documents are often filled with ...


16

Technical documents will have a deeply nested, hierarchical structure, and also make use of footnotes, different types of emphasis, cross-referencing, pull outs and side bars of one sort of another and captions. The main distinguishing feature of technical documents tends to be complex structure. For headings, you can use any reasonably legible font; this ...


16

Fifteen Centuries of Versals There are many ways to indicate the beginning (or resumption) of a section of text, including paragraph indents, blank lines, changing the weight or style of the opening part of the text, ornamentation like fleurons — and versals, a category that includes drop caps. A Manuscript Example Versals, also known as lettrines, ...


13

Robert Bringhurst's Elements of Typographic Style is a thorough and wonderful reference for things like this. It's long but very valuable. A lot of designers recommend a standard grid of lines so that a line+padding will always fit within, say, 16 pixels. So anything less than that would have a line height of 16, everything above that would have line height ...


10

I have the answer for French typography (and one of the nobiliary particles you quote is French, so…): the spaces preceding and following nobiliary particles should be regular spaces (the canonical reference being the Lexique des règles typographiques en usage à l'Imprimerie Nationale). I don't know if it holds in other languages, including English, but it ...


9

Ideally, nothing. Instead, use the actual content. Content is integral to a successful design, but, alas, even today, it's still treated like an afterthought all-to-often. Otherwise, Lorem ipsum is pretty much the habit.


9

Yeah - that'll work. http://www.lipsum.com/ is what I usually use.


8

"The Complete Manual of Typography" by James Felici has sections on French, Spanish and Italian typographic conventions. They probably cover most of the important points. There is also a good discussion of the differences between American and British conventions. The book is available as a PDF from Amazon and the publisher.


7

I've found this flowchart very helpful in selecting decent typefaces for various projects.


7

I remember struggling with this in CS3. I think the same fix will still apply in CS5. So here's what to do... First you create the type as you did in your example. You should see 3 small stripes outside of your circle. ( 2 with a small square on it, and 1 without the square) These are just indicators for where the text starts and ends grab the ...


7

Just by looking at the final page layout? I don't think there's really any easy way to tell in most cases regardless of the type of publication. I think that if a layout engine has been refined to produce good layouts and a human has cleaned up the results (i.e., Xtags with QuarkXpress), then it would be all but impossible to tell. Science and math ...


7

For German and English typesetting, there is 'Zweisprachige Mikrotypografie' by Amelie Solbrig available for free. It's an introduction to typesetting and a compilation of German and English typesetting rules. It also comprises interviews with industry practitioners. For a student, it beats the shamelessly overpriced 'Detailtypografie' by Forssman & de ...


6

If you can properly embed the fonts, then yes, you could just create the PDF directly from Word. InDesign is a much more robust page layout product, and offers a designer a much broader set of typographic and page layout tools with plenty of fine-tuning, but if you're find with the Word version, then technically, you can just convert that to the PDF you ...


6

Hey, I resemble that remark....


6

I'm no expert, but my experience with Lorum Ipsum is that my intended audience (usually product stakeholders and developers) finds it distracting. You want them to focus on layout, spacing, and typographic stuff, but instead they keep trying to figure out how to translate or decode it. I've had better luck using the first few paragraphs of Moby Dick. ...


6

For technical documents (or any other type) I have found the 'So You Need A Typeface' document to be very useful. It started out as a little bit of a joke around here, but it's actually incredibly useful. I've got a blown-up copy of it hanging on my wall. Link 1 Link 2


6

This is going to be somewhat dependent: on the parts of the world you are targeting what parts of a name you need to include (middle names/initials?) any other abbreviations that might be needed (Mrs, Dr, PhD, MSc?) characters used in names, unless of course you're using a monospaced font I don't think there's any substitute for sample test data from ...


6

Headings (proportinal font) and code blocks (background, mono spaced font) are typographical the simplest and cleanest solution. It will work with small snippets and big (page overflowing) examples: Python print "Hello world!" JavaScript alert('Hello world!'); SQL SET SERVEROUTPUT ON; BEGIN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Hello, world!'); END; Headings ...


6

That's a very big question. Let me tackle the fundamental issue. Basic definition Diacritics are marks that essentially change the character to which they are applied. Common examples are ñ, ü, and ê. Greek is full of them. The history Many of these marks are the result of evolutionary alphabet development. Ü, for instance, is really a digraph (two ...


6

I love LaTeX. That said, I've had great success using InDesign for professional quality typesetting with minimal effort. This is especially the case when I'm working with others since -- as you've noticed -- designers with LaTeX skills are approaching unicorn territory. If you've never used InDesign before it might not immediately qualify for your criteria ...


6

As it often goes with these things, the answer will be subjective. Here are some thoughts, though: I think I tend to go without a space unless I'm worried about things flowing to multiple lines. Perhaps context could help you decide. Maybe 'Download/Print PDF' carries a connotation of 'Download PDF and Print PDF' while 'Download / Print PDF' says 'Download ...


6

Augh! No, no, no, no, no. No spaces. Kerning is the correct answer. Adding spaces introduces the possibility for error, bad breaks, and misinterpretation. When two items which must be connected are separated by artificial spaces, you are breaking the required connections. If it bothers you visually that much, change the slash to "and" (Download and Print) ...


6

I would not put anything in small caps, especially partial words. There is no logic to having any word ever be partially small caps. Since proper adjectives are not proper names, the first character should be uppercase, but nothing small capped. In the end using small caps for your scenarios would not improve readability and ultimately, that is the very ...


6

As plainclothes has said, the dash is composed of several em-dashes. One might call it a long dash... Dickinson is best known for writing brief poems, often untitled, consisting of short lines peppered with long dashes, which mark her out as a more modern voice among her contemporary 19th-century poets. [Daily Telegraph] ...or perhaps an anonymisation ...


6

What you really want here is not actually available on the web: The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst, is widely held to be the Typographer’s Bible. It has been called “the finest book ever written about typography”, and it is. Accept no substitutes.


6

Its said that drop caps are used to define the beginning of large amounts of text as a visual marker. So typically any content that has to be typeset some will add a drop cap at the beginning of the chapter that takes away an eye soar of text anywhere between two or three lines such as: Drop Caps are not typically readable but an elegant identification ...


5

[Late edit, because I just realized none of us answered one of the key questions: "Why do we use it?"] Lorem ipsum and its alternatives are used for two reasons. The first is visual: we want to set up the text styles but don't have the real text available yet, or we want to show the client (or the art director) a mock-up. The second is practical: dummy text ...


5

This history is not for you its for others who also somewhere want to know about lorem ipsum incase From Wikipedia: Lorem Ipsum commonly used to demonstrate the graphic elements of a document or visual presentation, such as font, typography, and layout. The lorem ipsum text is typically a section of a Latin text by Cicero with words altered. Even ...


5

Yes, there are methods to do this. It's not used with the typography though (speaking in general). It's related to steganography and the common method is to use yellow ink to print a pattern of dots which can be recognized as a serial number or other ID depending on purpose. It is printed in a small size typically close to an edge. As yellow is hard to ...



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