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From your question, the general category of characters or symbols that you are referring to are called Whitespace Characters. Whitespace characters are the representation of any character that causes a horizontal or vertical spacing change in typography. The symbols themselves are called markup symbols and stem from proofreading editor markup symbol sets. ...


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The symbol you used for space (·) is 'MIDDLE DOT'(U+00B7) also known as interpunkt or One could alternatively use the symbol (␣) 2423 open box (space symbol) could not find a dot with circumfex but there are combining symbols in unicode so you could use 'COMBINING CIRCUMFLEX ACCENT' (U+0302) which would result in (·̂) but support in ...


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Here are some more examples, not sure if these fonts work well for your purpose which seems to be a programming environment.


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You get good differentiation with monospace fonts that have elongated ascenders for the lowercase 'L'. This also helps separating the lowercase 'L' from the uppercase 'i'. Here's an example from the superb Nitti by the Dutch typefoundry Bold Monday. Edit: Sorry this should be a comment, not an answer…


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Stacked fractions aren't supported by InDesign's fraction making features. To get stacked (or nut) fractions you need a font that has the stacked fractions. A list of some Google Fonts (all free) that you can use (thanks to @RadLexus): Coda – by Vernon Adams Telex – by Huerta Tipografica Arbutus Slab – by Karolina Lach Unica One – by Eduardo ...


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I think Rad Lexus is correct but didn't give the full answer. Don't use ascii (Alt + numbers) to create the fractions in InDesign. Use InDesign. Good high quality fonts will have OpenType Fractions, which is different than just having a single fraction Glyph: For example with Candara: But then you'll have to find a high quality font that has a ...


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