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1

The answer to both questions depends on your personal experience with the software and with the font you are using. Some font families will not give ideal results with every option ID gives you. Personally i would try using Balance Ragged Lines under your body copy paragraph style properties. This will even out long and short lines to a more compact looking ...


5

Do you want to mark only the place where a word is missing or do you want the reader to fill in by hand writing the missing word for an exercise? If you want the reader to fill in the missing word I would use underscore(s). If you want to give a hint you can write one underscore for one letter. If there should be no hint, use for example always 8 ...


3

Based on an answer in this thread, this minus sign was used in bookkeeping, because the - was already in use. After all the amounts were put in, they were checked twice. When the amount was correct, one would mark it by putting a little horizontal bar behind it. The bar meant the amount was correct. Since the usual minus sign could be confusing and ...


1

There is no one optimal contrast. Readability depends on a combination of contrast, font size, line height, font used, and audience's preference. Pulling from this great answer by Multicon on choosing colors for web design type: While a designer's eye should always be a part of the final equation when making design decisions, there is room to maneuver ...


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I found a similar result for what to do when missing a word. Except the result says to use 3-em dashes and not 2 if this was intentional. The en dash is used in typeset material and is shorter than the em dash, which is represented in typewritten material by two hyphens. It is used as a replacement for a hyphen when the meaning intended is ‘up to ...


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I would say balance is the right word. The costs are part of the effort you want to put in conveying your message. I've put balance in bold to emphasise the importance of it for this statement. If this was printed on paper, it would technically cost me more to emphasise it but I do want to put that effort into it as it enriches the message.(gain) If a ...


3

Short answer: Yes. With some printing methods, the actual accumulation of link on the page is a serious consideration -- it's why many fonts have/had small nicks ("ink traps") between the serif and the base, where excess ink could pool without distorting the letter shape. In modern offset printing, the amount of ink spread/dot gain that occurs is important ...



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