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3

You should kern your text, not track it (tracking is for adjusting uniform spacing in spans or blocks of text, kerning is for adjusting individual letter spacing). Kerning is located in the character palette, below font size and left of tracking (CS6). To use it, select the type tool and place the text cursor on the left side of the letter you want to ...


1

As the others have stated, this is a font issue, not an Illustrator one. I've noticed this happening in other Adobe programs as well, not only AI. My workaround for this is a simple one and involves placing a space in front of your first character, then you adjust the tracking of the space to a negative value, until it lines up where you'd like it. In the ...


4

EDIT: While everything I said in my answer is true, the answer that you are looking for is Qutorial's answer below. It's tested and it works nicely. Keep in mind that while using his method you need to be in text-editing mode with the focus in front of the first letter, only then you can change the value from auto (or 0) to a negative one! I'm sorry ...


0

It's helpful to assign a shortcut to the Type-->change case-->option of your choice. That way you can put in your search string and then when it highlights it, you just hit your keyboard combo and then hit find next and keep on going.


10

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


3

The concept at play here is that your eye (i.e. your brain) processes curves differently than it does straights. In a manner somewhat similar to how you "see" a halftone as a smooth tone, your eye finds an averaged location as the perceived "edge" of a curved letterform. Your positioning of your logoforms is "correct" according to this notion. The key of ...


32

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


29

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


5

I don't have any articles to back it up, but I can tell you from experience that you are correct. Just like manual kerning, spacing and aligning letterforms (and other objects) like this is part science, part art. Let your eye and gut guide you rather than exact numbers and math.



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