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7

I can't find anything that refers to that in any other way than crossing centre strokes. Look here for reference. However there is a pretty substantial glossary of type terms here that calls the meeting point between letters a Vertex. The fact that this comprehensive list doesn't reference the crossing centre strokes as having a specific term suggests that ...


4

When you justify text rather than leaving it left-aligned, InDesign has only so many ways to adjust things so that the right margin lines up. By default, it does this by adjusting the spaces between words. In this case, you are using a very large point size in relation to the width of the line, which forces InDesign to make a wide space between the only two ...


4

I haven’t tested this, but I this should be possible with contextual chaining substitutions. You roughly need to do the following (the details probably depend on the program you are using), taking the alternation between vertical and horizontal as an example: Make your default letters vertical. Create a single-substitution feature that replaces each ...


3

In this context, the " here is acting as an icon, not punctuation. It's a visual clue as to the context of the block of text, indicating what it is and why it was pulled from the document flow. This also explains why they are always styled differently to regular text: larger, bolder, often using a secondary colour, and often taken from a completely ...


2

Yes. Namely because that though they are type marks (the quotes) they are often being used as graphical elements in the context of pull quotes. A pull quote, essentially, is just a bit of text 'pulled out' of the normal flow visually. What that visual is doesn't follow any particular rules other than it needs to contrast with the rest of the content enough ...


2

There is not much overlap in fonts except for core web fonts (Arial, Georgia, Verdana, Tahoma, Times New Roman, Courier, Comic Sans, Trebuchet). I think a more important question is which fonts you really NEED, are there acceptable susbstitutions, or what is the cost of replacing those. I doubt you need to have all fonts. List of fonts installed with OSX ...


1

I thought it was just one of those antique-style letterpress types that Wikipedia chose to retain the association with 'timeless learning', 'classic', 'knowledge' and so on. But your question made me look it up and interestingly, I found something on a website called Letterpress Daily: Apparently this is called "Jenson Old Style" and it's based on William ...


1

The kind of usage you have will determine how much playfulness you'll be able to get away with. If it's short text, you can try something more fun, for example: JollyGood Sans (full disclosure: I designed it) Dr Agu Sans Billy If you need something more serious I can recommend: Mikado Linotte Tide Sans


1

I like century gothic" because it has the simple a and g shapes that children are taught.


1

It depends on a lot of variables including the context in which the text is being used and with the message that one wants to communicate which also ties into which typeface/font is selected. Generally most body text falls between 10 to 14 pt. Ultimately though there is no "perfect" font size for a given page - as Robert Bringhurst notes in his seminal book, ...


1

Old thread, new solution Go to TYPE-->GLYPHS Ensure the Show drop down is set to Entire Font. Set the font to Symbol | Regular (for some reason this doesn't work on a standard type fram). In the symbols font, toward the end (just before the closed apple) You'll find the individual bracket elements. Adjust the indent, vertical scale and space after ...



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