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46

It Started Curved The apostrophe first appeared in the printed universe in Italy, 16th century, as a curved shape to signify elision copied from handwritten classical Italian poetry. The apostrophe was equivalent to our "Gotchas" or "Wannas" in the sense that it was a way to take the stiffness of the text away by making it sound more human-like. Here is an ...


19

Did a bit of research to make sure, but in general "proper" typography doesn't use straight quotes, single or double. Here's a handy guide for the commands and HTML entities for single/double curly quotes. Typewriters are also responsible for the introduction of ‘straight quotes’, non-specific quote marks designed as a space-saving measure for the ...


8

The Unicode Standard comments on U+2019 (’): this is the preferred character to use for apostrophe As far as what is right encoding-wise, I cannot think of a higher authority. Also, the typographical conventions of most languages do not use U+2019 for other purposes or only as secondary quotation marks. In fact, British English is the only major ...


6

TL;DR What you are asking about is called optical sizes. It is the optimisation of typefaces to the size at which they will be viewed – in relation to the viewer’s field of vision, not the pixel resolution. For example, ideally you wouldn’t use the same glyph shapes for footnotes and headlines. What optical sizes are not Optical sizes have nothing to do ...


4

First, some history. Curly quotes and apostrophes were the original style. They are also called Printer's quotes and apostrophes. Straight quotes and apostrophes came along with the typewriter. The typewriter being a mechanical device with limitations decided that it made more sense to use one set of straight marks instead of two separate sets of curly ...


3

Unicode superscripts one, two and three […] are […] the same "height". Unicode superscripts four and five […] are […] the same "height" but said height seems to be different from the heights of Unicode superscript one, two and three. Unicode is about encoding characters not about their detailed shape. For example, the Unicode character U+0067 (Latin ...


3

Just to get this off the unanswered list, and since my comment appears to have been useful: Most of the actual typographical requirements listed in this question will be matched by most fonts on the market; there are just one or two deal-breakers that are largely type-dependent: Serif fonts rarely have single-storey g’s (except sometimes as an alternate) ...


2

There aren't enough characters to make the best assessment of the font. But tools such as the following may get you very close: WhatTheFont Identifont Try ignoring the shadow as it may or may not be part of the font family.


2

There is one item that all the answers so far have not mentioned. On a command line interface or in a programming language, the apostrophe (UTF-8 character 27) is the only valid choice. The use of U+2019 with cause syntax errors when you do a cut and paste. With the automatic translation of the character 27 to U+2019, it now means that copying command ...


1

It depends on the font and the software you are using. On a web site, such as here in Graphic Design, it is possible that the default font only contains the 'standard' ¹²³ and not any others, so these will be taken from another font in the font stack. There is no HTML code <super> but, assuming you mean <sup>, just use that. Even if you try to ...


1

If you're talking about the capitolized J in Museo Sans Rounded, I think you're referring to the Arm of that letter. Quote from http://www.typographydeconstructed.com/arm/ Definition: The arm of a letter is the horizontal stroke on some characters that does not connect to a stroke or stem at one or both ends. The top of the capital T and the ...


1

Yes, this is correct. Adobe Edge Web Fonts is a free service from Adobe, an "open"-like equivalent for Typekit. It uses the same structure and works the same way, but it's free. However, fonts available there are usually lower quality or very well-known open license type families.



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