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16

Fifteen Centuries of Versals There are many ways to indicate the beginning (or resumption) of a section of text, including paragraph indents, blank lines, changing the weight or style of the opening part of the text, ornamentation like fleurons — and versals, a category that includes drop caps. A Manuscript Example Versals, also known as lettrines, ...


16

There are two types of ligatures. Type 1: The reason ligatures exist is to prevent spaces between some letters which could disturb your reading flow. For example in some fonts "fi" overlap each other or especialy "fl". In order to find a solution for this problem, ligatures were invented, each becoming just one letter on the typeblock: Normal letters vs ...


11

No One Rule Fits All Situations This is all somewhat complicated, because it ties in with kerning support and font selection, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer that will serve for all situations. In my experience, ligatures are more apt to be needed in a tightly set serif roman or italic, not so much in a sans font. For more discussion and ...


8

What do they mean? as explained here The BQ and BE OpenType Basic versions correspond to the Berthold BQ and Adobe BE PostScript Type 1 Legacy versions. What is the difference as explained here The Berthold BQ and Adobe Berthold versions are derived from the same data source and so the character outlines are almost identical. The metrics (spacing and ...


7

As a general recomendation I would suggest to add a bit more of negative space. You can get this by reducing your font size up to 10 or even 9 pt (don't be scared, it would be readable enough). At the same time I would reuse some of the space we've gained increasing line height; everything will look lighter and cleaner. You can also reduce a bit your name ...


6

Its said that drop caps are used to define the beginning of large amounts of text as a visual marker. So typically any content that has to be typeset some will add a drop cap at the beginning of the chapter that takes away an eye soar of text anywhere between two or three lines such as: Drop Caps are not typically readable but an elegant identification ...


5

Here is what I would play with: loose the italic and uppercase on the "education", "skills" etc. One will do nicely. And I would imagine that you can skip the ":", as it is pretty obvious what follows. I would make the line space bigger and also increase the paragraph shifts. I would make the indents a lot bigger on "experience" and down to the actual ...


4

In many fonts designed for readable body text, ligatures tend to be subtle tweaks that are barely noticeable, just fixing what would otherwise be an awkward placement of adjacent letter shapes. The Futura fi ligature in your example, however, isn't really like that — it stands out quite prominently, and is arguably unnecessary, in that the un-ligated ...


4

It is probably short for "Berthold Exklusivs" collection.


3

The cheapest way to do it is with pantone gold. But that is only a avarage way to achieve gold. The real deal is to use «Hot Stamping». A heated die presses the gold-foil onto the stationary. Which results in a realy cool gold effect. The downside of this are the costs because you need a separate die for every size. So if you have two products with two ...


3

Correct me if I'm wrong, but pretty sure this isn't possible in PS. If you're working with that much type that you need to use many text boxes, ideally it should be done in InDesign or Illustrator.


3

A Google search indicates that others have asked as well but I'm not seeing much planned. A project did exist, and received funding to improve the text --- it was implemented already. http://www.linuxfund.org/projects/inkscape/ Here is a Feature Request, but it has gotten very little support. I'd venture to say its because Inkscape is an illustration suite, ...


3

If you want to do serious kerning, there are a few Javascript libraries out there that let you write up kerning rules using something a little like CSS. Of these, the best I've seen is the memorably-named kerning.js, which lets you target characters by pairs (e.g. ss pairs), number (e.g. the 6th character in a heading) and patterns like every nth letter. It ...


2

All of these are potentially good points if they're backed up by a valid design reason (as opposed to a personal preference or opinion). I always caution against fixed ideas that might not apply in every circumstance. For long documents, readability, invisibility (making the typography unnoticeable), clarity (chapters, headings, subheads and text clearly ...


2

Beware, what you're asking about is purely opinion-based, which is rather against the principles of this stackexchange. Flush-left since MS Word doesn't allow the kind of hyphenation/justification adjustments that would eliminate rivers for fully justified text. Bad. Justified text is good as long as people use proper paragraph and sentences that ...


2

Overall, the design looks slick, but it makes your experience look minimal. If you had at least 2 jobs on there, I think it would be fine. There isn't much contrast between your name and subheading. I also don't understand what the subheading is- title? freelance company name? handle? All of these are unnecessary anyway. If you really feel the need to ...


1

The caption of an figure should be below the figure. So if you are looking on a figure you should be able to read the caption. If the figure is rotated the caption should be rotated too. Because the page number usually has a fixed place were it is printed in a document I would not rotate the page number, I would just leave it out. But this is my opinion ... ...


1

Nice work! Generally, I agree with @raulaglo on the whitespace. In addition: I would make the timeline-line one stroke: there are gaps there I would move the contact with phone and twitter to align with the left column. Achieve this by making the name smaller (you have to take into account that people might have very long, double names) Pull the text in ...


1

Apply letter-spacing over spans you set in the HTML. Unfortunately, there's no nth-character rule in CSS yet. It will be a humongous task to have your kerning correction degrade gracefully, especially when your font stack is large.


1

I'm guessing your points look something like this: Two ways to improve this curve. First, angle the middle point so that the handles flow into the handles from the other points: Or, remove the middle point entirely. Less points = less opportunities to create jaggedness, if you can still get the look you want:


1

I think a Sans Serif font works best. See samples below:


1

Here is what I would try first: find a soft sans-serif, such as Optima. It feels gentle without serifs: If you still want a serif font, I would go with something that has more contrast than the ones you are experimenting with. The block/slab-ish feel of the "first congregational" needs a little contrast in the serif font below, to not feel off. You could ...


1

Is the pale shadow-treatment on the entire box on the WP page something that is added by WP? Essentially what you are making is a "footnote" or "quote" functionality, boxes to add a little more information. Treat it as such: as something that should not scream loudly over the main content, but be a teaser. Consider what newspapers do: More information: ...


1

This will answer your questions. E is for exclusive and Q for Quality http://desktoppub.about.com/od/typefoundries/a/Type-Foundry-Abbreviations-In-Fonts.htm


1

In paragraph-formatted text, there will generally be about half a word of useless space in each line, and about half a line of semantically-useless empty space following each paragraph. In text with long paragraphs, wider columns will reduce the amount of space wasted on line breaks without overly increasing the space wasted on paragraph breaks. In text ...



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