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19

This is called ligature. There is some useful background knowledge on Wikipedia In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph. Many ligatures combine f with an adjacent letter. The most prominent example is fi (or f‌i, rendered with two normal letters). The tittle of the i in ...


9

"Hairline" generally refers to a stroke or line smaller then 0.25pt in width. Sometimes it may mean smaller than 0.5pt in width. "Hairline" is not directly associated with any type glyph and is not a term used exclusively for typography. A Hairline can be any line, any where.


6

As mentioned, this is a ligature, and is one of many similar ligatures such as ffi, fl, ffl, Th, oe and ae. If you're interested in this sort of detail within fonts (and within design, as a larger topic), I'd highly recommend the book Type Matters, by Jim Williams. It's an excellent reference manual for anyone interested in typography, and, if applied in ...


3

There's different ways to answer this. Purely from a visual/graphic design standpoint, yes, you can space your text in any way you see fit to make it look good. Often we need to adjust typography optically by hand to make things 'feel' right even if mathematically they are off. Technically, it depends on the context of your markup. If this is one ...


3

Sure, it's perfectly acceptable. There's no rule saying you can't. With that being said, the two things you have to consider most are Responsiveness - If the screen or container size is too small then some text may be pushed to the next line which messes up the whole styling. Changing text later on - If the text is changed on a later date to something ...


2

How about Flama Ultra-Condensed: I'd say it doesn't get anymore condensed than this. http://www.felicianotypefoundry.com/cms/fonts/flama-ultra-condensed Serif fonts would be more readable but would also need more space. Dorica seems to be a serif font for small sizes:


1

You may want to take a look at fonts designed for signage, where legibility is a prime issue and you often have space restrictions. The main difference between the situations is that you do not have to take conditions such as fog into account. However, similar issues may arise for readers with bad eyesight whom you have to consider but who are not allowed to ...


1

Since this is a jpeg, you will have to turn each letter into a vector. The quick way but not very good way of turning a jpeg into a vector is by going to Object -> Image Trace -> Make. Red: You can then select Image Trace Panel to fine tune the selection. This will bring up a window where you can select options so Illustrator knows how you want the ...



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