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32

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


29

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


15

Most politicians on camera are probably using teleprompters. Teleprompters don't use the more impressive typography. They are almost always white on black, with a big sans-serif font. Sometimes they are all caps-sometimes not. If the speech is printed, it was probably done by a speech writer or assistant, with little consideration given to typography at all ...


10

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


5

I don't have any articles to back it up, but I can tell you from experience that you are correct. Just like manual kerning, spacing and aligning letterforms (and other objects) like this is part science, part art. Let your eye and gut guide you rather than exact numbers and math.


4

This is drawing heavily from The Memphis Group's design motifs. They became shorthand for the 80s, due to the rather bizarre level of market acceptance they received during that period. For something slightly less gaudy, also look at Constructivism and De Stijl.


4

Note that most of the following is nothing but an educated guess. I do not know what actually motivated the Typeplate scale If you mulitply 18 repeatedly with ∛2 ≈ 1.26 you get the following sequence which, when rounded to “standard” font sizes yields the Typeplate scale with some exceptions: 18.0 → 18 22.7 → 21 28.6 → 24 – This is out of place, 28 would ...


3

The concept at play here is that your eye (i.e. your brain) processes curves differently than it does straights. In a manner somewhat similar to how you "see" a halftone as a smooth tone, your eye finds an averaged location as the perceived "edge" of a curved letterform. Your positioning of your logoforms is "correct" according to this notion. The key of ...


3

It's all about improving your delivery. Increasing your leading or line-height will help your eye track back to the next line. Increasing the font size will help you see the text at arm's length. Decreasing the kerning will make the text more legible at larger font sizes. A serif font (like Times) is allegedly more legible in print, though this may or may ...


2

If you're reading off paper, a serif typeface is preferable. This helps your eye move from one character into the next, especially when you have black text on a white background. For on-screen cases, it's the opposite, especially when reading white text on a black background. In those cases, use sans-serif. Keep your paragraphs short, maybe even a single ...


2

Roman numbers are hard to read and confusing. Use simple numbers 1,2,3,4.. If you have any sub sections make it as 1.1, 1.2 ... Using both roman and arabic numerals will be difficult to identify if the list goes on. So I would suggest you to use only arabic numerals. I recommend you to read this article written by 'Matthew Butterick' in his book ...


2

The rules about numbering and bullets are specific to the institute/firm/organisation you work/study in. In general, the use of Roman numbers is not recommended considering the fact that younger generations do not understand them properly. The current tendency is to abandon their use entirely. For example: Rome finally abandons 'too complicated' ...


2

For this kind of project: 1. Not only you need to be careful about bleed, but you need to make sure your sticker is a bit bigger than the white area in your book. Otherwise it will look weird and white borders will be visible if the stickers are not perfectly applied! People don't apply stickers perfectly, you need to add a few millimeters to help them a ...


1

I'm currently working through Mary Kate McDevitt's book The Hand Lettering Ledger which has been greatly beneficial to my craftsmanship and has taught me a lot through examples and tips. The most important way to learn for me is to practice lettering and to do so a lot. Then I look at examples for inspiration, both online and in the world around me, and ...


1

I'd probably call it '80s revival' as the colours, while still gaudy, are slightly more muted than actual 1980s colours (for example, 'Miami Vice' titles or The Memphis Group's furniture, as @plainclothes says). If you want a shorter term, how about 'naff'!? (If you lived through the 80s it's quite depressing to see this sort of mish-mash come back on ...


1

you want to know a system default font then better you go with "monotype corsiva". What i am suggesting is to take a normal sans font, because writing style fonts are good in Logo, but if it comes to your entire website content it will not look good.


1

I've designed an art book before with hanging indents but I had huge margins which made it look a lot better. I think both can work but having hanging indents would indeed cost more in terms of paper because they would require more space to look good. There are many other factors that will play on legibility. I would only design with hanging indents if I ...


1

sorry, cannot comment yet, am still a new member today, so here my humble answer: You are asking about peoples feelings. And about space (cost). I would personally have much better readability, if you would use the space you "lost" leftside through your hanging indents and turned them into whitespace between your paragraphs. I.e. try another new-line ...


1

Photoshop is the wrong tool for the job since Photoshop is essentially a raster program whereas a dieline is a vector. That being the case you will need to use a program that was designed to handle vectors. I'd highly recommend inDesign in this instance since it handles both vector (the dieline) and raster images (the illustration) very well. This process ...



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