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39

Great question! A good place to start is the faceted search tool on Typekit, which gives options for the main types of typeface and the main dimensions they can be measured against: So you could look for Typekit options that seem to match, and try them out. As you choose descriptions you can instantly see the sort of fonts that come up, so you can tell ...


7

There are different ways to classify typefaces. user568458 covers one way in their answer - big umbrellas like sans-serif and serif, and physical characteristics. This is a great start for someone, particularly if you're not all that interested in the nerdy details. But if you are interested in matching fonts, it helps to know some of the subgenres so you ...


7

It's unfortunate that Khaled hasn't had a chance to respond here, but I'll give you my typographer response. As a general principle, I would strongly recommend sticking with the typographic conventions of each culture. Distorting letterforms (or choosing unusual typefaces that don't convey the same sense of formality as small caps do in English) is ...


6

Teaching her the names of the different parts might not work, it really depends how much she loves letters. You could probably try some basic script writing if she can already manage some writing. I'm sure there are books to practice that but I can't name any off the top of my head. Try to tie typography with things she already likes a lot. I heard of a ...


6

What you really want here is not actually available on the web: The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst, is widely held to be the Typographer’s Bible. It has been called “the finest book ever written about typography”, and it is. Accept no substitutes.


5

It's more art than science Classifying fonts is a tricky business full of opinions of varying quality. Here's a great quote from a Typophile thread on the topic: It's gonna be tough to get a straight answer out of people about this one. Categorizing fonts is one of those things that seems to attract an inordinate amount of attention, for results of ...


4

There have been plenty of work in that area. That's where a majority of a graphic design student's time goes. Without getting too in-depth, here are a few resources to get you started: Color Theory Web Typography Basics Typography Theory All that being said, it will save you time and money to hire a classically-trained designer to answer a lot of ...


4

You need a digital Bringhurst. It is by no means complete after it's long "in progress" status, but The Elements of Typographic Style Applied to the Web is a cool resource. As the name implies, it attempts to bring Robert Bringhurst's classic into the digital world. From the author's 2005 introduction: In order to allay some of the myths surrounding ...


4

Rather than typography, which is many levels of understanding removed from the basic idea of letters-as-symbols-for-sounds, teach her the basics of calligraphy, from which all typography is derived, after all. We learn, and (hopefully) teach, any subject using gradients of understanding; reading and writing are no exception. If a child doesn't grasp the ...


3

What you're looking for, based on the specific things you mention, is a style guide rather than a manual of typography. There are many available online. (Just search for "English style guide" and you'll get plenty.) For British and Commonwealth English, the Oxford Style Guide has quasi-biblical authority. The style guide on Dictionary.com, although it ...


2

Well, there used to be a number of style guides available freely on-line --- only two seem to be left: U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/pagedetails.action?granuleId=&packageId=GPO-STYLEMANUAL-2008&fromBrowse=true Though you may find the European take on this of interest: Europa Publications Office: ...


2

As boblet points out, there really aren't fonts that have equal spacing between each letterform. The reason is that it would look funny. The spacing between each pair of letters is calculated so that it 'looks' even--even when it's mathematically not (often called optical spacing). The better quality the font, the more of these individual calculations ...


2

If you have a font in an image that you are unable to identify, the "What The Font" tool can help you identify it. It's not a perfect tool by any means, but if you're not a typography expert/savant, it can point you in the right direction.


2

The sign you are talking about is FLEURON and DINGBAT. “It can also be used to fill the whitespace that result from the indentation of the first line of a paragraph,on a line by itself to divide paragraphs in a highly stylized way, to divide lists, or for pure ornamentation” Every education organisation has its own requirements of how the thesis should ...


2

From a pure technical standpoint distortion is very easy to do. To understand this you have to realize that the image is a matrix stacked onto your screen. If we need to refer to a specific pixel its easiest to think of this pixel as having a coordinate in both x and y within the image filed. To visualize this let use normalize the coordinates to 0-1 range ...


2

Not sure how many words your want to distort, but if it's not too many you could just use the Liquify tool in Photoshop. Filter > Liquify Then with the brush just push the text about until you're happy with it. You will have to raster the text for it to work.


2

Psychological reactions to different colors were studied in multiple studies. In general Yellow and Blue are less "aggressive" than Red. Pastel hues seem to be relaxing as well. You can try to read abstracts in PubMed, I put here some excerpts from some of them. Child friendly colors in a pediatric dental practice (whole article) - "The use of child ...


2

Use them if you want to. I think this is more common (but not very, any more) in non-tech academic fields. Personally, I think it adds a little flourish and can be nice as long as you do not do it for every single page. And of course, there are masses of other alternatives to that specific glyph. You might be surprised, your default fonts often have a ...


1

While Ilan is correct that the specific glyph is a Fleuron, there are various terms for the general concept: Tombstone -30- End Sign As always with type, there are no hard-and-fast rules or definitions surrounding this. It typically will come down to a style/aesthetic decision on your part. I can't say if they are common in a thesis or not. They are ...


1

If you want to build 116 shapes using linear (the same spatial relationships) combination of the smaller building shapes you should use minimum 5 different elements. 5 different elements give you 5!= 120 combinations (shapes, letters etc). 4 possible shapes gives you 4!=25 combinations. Because the letters are much more complicated then just 1 or 5 ...


1

There is a better way The old approach to branded web type: A. Render type in images to avoid font availability issues. B. Use a system font that's close but waaaay more clunky. Don't do that. Use web fonts. There are plenty of quality sources. On a budget but still need high quality? Go to Google Fonts. You can even download them for print. Font ...


1

To keep it brief, you should definitely know if the font you are looking for is Serif (with serifs) or Sans Serif (without serifs). Serifs are those little "tails" at the ends of certain lines. For example Times New Roman or Cambria is Serif font and Arial, Helvetica or Calibri is Sans Serif. If you are looking for something outside of that definition, it ...



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