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7

As a general recomendation I would suggest to add a bit more of negative space. You can get this by reducing your font size up to 10 or even 9 pt (don't be scared, it would be readable enough). At the same time I would reuse some of the space we've gained increasing line height; everything will look lighter and cleaner. You can also reduce a bit your name ...


7

The benefit of having your full name in a logo is that, well, your name is the logo. Nike has the benefit of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to train the public to know that a "swoosh" = Nike, but you don't have that luxury. Not yet, anyways! While using initials or symbols in logos can sometimes lead to more creative solutions or more distinctive ...


6

The font was designed to fit most cases so in most cases, your L would be preceded by another letter and so on. Good designers definitely pay attention to these small details, it really makes your design look more professional even if it is very subtle. If you are in InDesign, you won't be able to kern the first letter of a line so what you can do is simply ...


5

Here is what I would play with: loose the italic and uppercase on the "education", "skills" etc. One will do nicely. And I would imagine that you can skip the ":", as it is pretty obvious what follows. I would make the line space bigger and also increase the paragraph shifts. I would make the indents a lot bigger on "experience" and down to the actual ...


5

I totally understand the frustration of being in weak in grids and typography, specially if you are a self taught graphic designer. To me this is very open ended question and that there is no right answer to point out for you. In my personal experience, it is how you train your eyes and get feedback from your fellow designers would certainly improve your ...


4

You nearly always have to adjust type manually to fit the particular use. Also note that you rarely want it to literally line up. Rather, you want it to optically line up--meaning it 'looks' right, even if technically it's not exact. For example, you may allow rounded glyphs like a 'O' to extend further out compared to flat glyphs like an 'H'. You also ...


4

You can achieve this drawing the two external shapes and then creating a blend, from Object -> Blend -> Make and edit the steps with Object -> Blend -> Blend Options and specify the steps.


4

Generally a programming language will have a device context which will allow you to draw some example text and then measure it's width and height. For example in python, using wxPython GUI toolkit: import wx dc = wx.ScreenDC() #yourFont = wx.Font(10, wx.DEFAULT, wx.NORMAL, wx.NORMAL, True) #dc.SetFont(yourFont) w,h = dc.GetTextExtent('X') Regardless of ...


3

Correct me if I'm wrong, but pretty sure this isn't possible in PS. If you're working with that much type that you need to use many text boxes, ideally it should be done in InDesign or Illustrator.


3

I much prefer design 1 It's got great use of white space and gives priority to the information. It also shows the shape of the map in a much more subtle way, 'there but not there'. In the second design the type seems a little squashed into a shape that takes priority, that is by comparison to design 1 which is very fluid (literally) it seems to have a ...


3

The cheapest way to do it is with pantone gold. But that is only a avarage way to achieve gold. The real deal is to use Ā«Hot StampingĀ». A heated die presses the gold-foil onto the stationary. Which results in a realy cool gold effect. The downside of this are the costs because you need a separate die for every size. So if you have two products with two ...


2

this question is like "how should my logo look like?" my advice would be to hire a designer/design studio to do it for you or just start start sketching all of your ideas out. there is little reason to choose a text only logo before sketching out all of the above. Also look at what other bands/music makers have in their style and maybe try to fit in.


2

You should adjust it manually if you think it's obvious enough to be noticed. No font or software is perfect. So even though the math says it's already exactly right it can still look a bit wrong. Remember that whoever will be exposed to your design won't know or care if the math is correct or if the font was designed that way, they will judge your work only ...


2

Overall, the design looks slick, but it makes your experience look minimal. If you had at least 2 jobs on there, I think it would be fine. There isn't much contrast between your name and subheading. I also don't understand what the subheading is- title? freelance company name? handle? All of these are unnecessary anyway. If you really feel the need to ...


1

The caption of an figure should be below the figure. So if you are looking on a figure you should be able to read the caption. If the figure is rotated the caption should be rotated too. Because the page number usually has a fixed place were it is printed in a document I would not rotate the page number, I would just leave it out. But this is my opinion ... ...


1

Nice work! Generally, I agree with @raulaglo on the whitespace. In addition: I would make the timeline-line one stroke: there are gaps there I would move the contact with phone and twitter to align with the left column. Achieve this by making the name smaller (you have to take into account that people might have very long, double names) Pull the text in ...


1

I very recently made a music logo, but for a different purpose (business, website and app). I think I can add some things I picked up during the whole process. I went through maybe 20 iterations, and the last iteration included rebuilding it and incorporating the Golden Ratio into it as much as I could, it actually pulled off the effect I was imagining much ...



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