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72

The vertical alignment of a plus sign and minus sign will be consistent (obviously I can't say for certain for all fonts, but generally). What you are using there (I assume), and the key on your keyboard is actually a hyphen or hyphen-minus. The vertical alignment of hyphens and dashes are often not the same as the alignment for a minus sign, which will be ...


3

The alternative characters (or glyphs) will be controlled by specific OpenType features. Most likely either ligatures, stylistic alternates or contextual alternates. How you control the use of these features will depend on the software you are using your font with. For example, in Illustrator you can control which features are used in your text through the ...


3

A typeface with a large x-height (the relative size of lowercase vs. uppercase letters) may have one typeface 'look' bigger than the other. Moreover, and no less common, point size is hardly a measure for actual glyph size. Verdana uppercase is larger than Garamond uppercase, for example. Some typefaces have ridiculously small letters for their point sizes. ...


3

This is not an industry standard rule, in fact it goes against the rules of correct punctuation. However it may be a brand rule. These may override even the laws of physics. Just kidding, not physics, but grammar and punctuation certainly. Try and ascertain if this is an established brand rule. It sounds as though it is, especially if the instructions ...


2

Good question! I really like, and agree with, the answers given so far. My answer focuses more on pragmatic technique rather than scientific or mathematical reasoning. :D With that said, my preference is to use the baseline and x-height (see Type Terms section below) as the starting point for my box’s top and bottom lines respectively. Hopefully this GIF ...


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Visual weight is so dynamic that it really cannot be dictated by x-height, cap height, etc... Certain elements in your design may pull the eye in one direction over the other despite mathematically being "center", from its left to right side in comparison to the canvas, for instance. The "visual center" is where all of the elements weights are balanced ...


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Design is not always an exact science. Often what looks correct, may not be what is the true center or what is mathematically correct. Specifically, in your question it would depend on the ascenders and descenders in the text to determine best the optical alignment. If there are no ascenders or descenders, the ideal alignment can change. In your examples, ...


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From what I can understand, your asking what style of font best characterises the 'ideal' educational institution - respected, safe, knowledgeable. This is a very personal question as the subject of fonts is a very subjective one with many personal responses pertaining to the context of exposure to various graphical triggers. Personally, in educational ...


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My 2 cents. This is NOT to memorize, but to feel the flow. Totally depends on the letter. For serif fonts and sans serif I would: 1) Start with an lowercase o. Simple, elegant, like a child starting to write. 2) d You can adapt the previous letter o with a vertical stroke to define the ascenders. 3) Suddently you now have a base for p, q, and b. 4) Take ...


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See also Glyphtracer: Glyphtracer takes an image of letters. It detects all letter forms and allows the user to tag them. They are then vectorised and passed on to Fontforge for fine tuning. https://launchpad.net/glyphtracer



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