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12

It doesn't matter what you do. Some will always read them in a different order. The brand should include use of the company name in some locations so that, eventually, the public gets used to thinking H-- S--- S--- C---. As you can see HERE the order is largely irrelevant and makes no sense until the actual name of the company is included. I, personally, ...


10

Of course everybody will read in a different way, but when you consider all possible combinations, you can still find out which has the highest probability of being read in the right order. Since we read from left to right and top to bottom, we can rule the right and bottom quarters out as starting points. Here are the possible reading orders: Since two ...


10

Limit their options. Lots of people like to think they are knowledgable in design, or typography, because 'anyone can judge whether something looks good or not, right?'—while they aren't. Don't let them do your work for you. My advice would be to do your research and deliver three options (possibly four), and present those to them, nothing more. Do ...


9

how do you present multiple examples to the team I agree with Vincent, but will be a bit more emphastic: You don't Your job is to present the best option and then back up that decision as you see fit. Avoid too many options if you can. One, maybe two is ideal.


8

As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


6

Really nice design! I think you definitely got the vibe right. Couple of things to consider: The email at the bottom, because the text is in the same font, it makes it a little difficult to read. If you made the first word bold, for example, that would separate it a little more. I find the alignment of the date and the word Lauantai a little confusing. ...


5

The different parts of a corporate identity program can't designed in isolation. They are like the variables, object classes and functions you build into a piece of code, or the parts of an engine: they have to work together as a whole. For that reason, context is everything. A color can appear quite different in different surroundings, as many famous ...


4

For word, you can change the Corbel typeface to lining figures or old style figure by clicking the flyout menu in the font area of Word's navigation. Then click on the Advanced tab and use the drop down menu beside Number Forms. You can adjust ligatures and all sorts here too! It works for Outlook and Publisher too apparently. Source: ...


4

I would start by saying keep an open mind. People don't tend to like change even if they have asked for it. I usually present typography in the way it's going to be used, for example if your company has a heavy typographic leaflet, create a new one and explain the benefits of such typeface. Don't just put the alphabet together and say here we go guys. Show ...


3

I think you're really over-thinking this. It is not a stroke. In most cases trying to use a stroke will not yield the straight top/bottom because a stroke will follow the type contours more. It's merely a rounded rectangle behind the type. That's all. The right side may have been manually altered to align with the O at the end of the first line, but other ...


3

I don't think it needs to be the same as your logo, particularly if it's somewhat exotic, but it should complement your logo. If your logo has big chunky letters, the headline font should have something in the same genre rather than Bodoni. The logo should look like it belongs to the website, not that it had run there when it was a young logo, playing at ...


3

Historically, the single storey a was the italics version, as it more emulated handwriting. Many geometric sans faces also adopted the single storey version. But there's no hard-and-fast rule one way or the other. Both are acceptable glyphs.


3

Adobe Illustrator contains no feature which generates bulleted lists automatically. You can set up your own bullets by using a special character at the beginning of each line, then adding a tab, and subsequently adjusting the tabs for the text.


3

For me, I'd use hanging punctuation. Essentially you ignore the quotes and align to text. The punctuation (quote mark) hangs outside the column edge. This is very common in typesetting and dates back to the Gutenberg bible. Overall hanging punctuation helps the alignment of text appear more solid or uniform.


3

When designing for emails, I go for the lowest common denominator. If a particular font is important, limit it to a few words and make it a graphic. Otherwise, just assume "serif/sans serif" and don't try to design with fonts. There is no way to control or predict what the user will have installed, what email client is being used, or what version of what ...


3

You did say square didn't you? H S S C This way, either way it is read: 1) top, left to right, then bottom, let to right 2) or left, top to bottom then right, top to bottom Your logo will then read HSSC either way! E.G. H S1 S2 C I could read it: H, S1, S2, C or H, S2, S1, C AND EITHER WAY I READ IT HSSC! YAY. If you can only rearrange the ...


2

There are a few rules of thumb, that i know of: gutter width ≈ line spacing gutter width ≈ width of »mii« Too much is a little bit less problematic than too little spacing between columns. These rules should be seen only as a starting point to a proper solution. Sources: Claudia Runk: Grundkurs Typografie und Layout. 2. Auflage. Galileo Press, ...


2

Like Scott said, his brain read it as HCSS, so did I. I would read it as HSSC if you put H on top, then S S then C H H S S C S C S First one Makes S's appear in the center. Just to be sure I'd ask people around me if they read it as HSSC, I'd be happy!


2

I don't know if there is a particular reason to have the letters in 4 sections, but you could consider something like this to make it unambiguous: The elipse could even be shadded or raised or have some other effects added.


2

Those are typically accessed through the Glyphs panel in Adobe applications, usually under Type > Glyphs. This shows all characters in the font file, allowing you to pick and choose. Double click a character to insert it at your text cursor's current location. You can even click and hold a character in the palette when it has a small triangle in the lower ...


2

Unless you are making a statement by the typeface you choose, you can do far worse then using Times New Roman for body with Helvetica for headlines. No one will think they are a great choose, but they are everywhere and will not give your company a bad image. So if the brand does not have a set of values that calls for a distinct choose of typeface, maybe ...


2

To create text with a tight stroke like that in Illustrator, I would first create the top text, what you see in colour with no stroke. I would then duplicate that layer, and lock the top layer. On the bottom layer, select the text, turn it into outlines (command-shift-o) and give it a stroke of your desired thickness and colour. The fill doesn't really ...


2

The height/width ratio depends on the particular typeface, some (e.g., Times Roman) being inherently narrower than others (such as Bookman). Many typefaces have Compressed, Condensed, Regular and/or Extended fonts in the family. Obviously the height/width average is very different for each. The range spans a wide spectrum from the incredibly narrow (Universe ...


1

what better way than to show in the browser? after all, that's where their going to be viewed. i'm a firm believer in building the browser, and this is just another tenet of it. at the most basic level, you can simply take a page of content you have now and swap the fonts out. this will vary on the font(s) and your methods, but not by much and nothing too ...


1

Customize your font! If the conditions are right, it's actually pretty easy. I just had a case where I needed to use the lining figures of a font for a Web project. However, OpenType features aren't 100% reliable yet. Also, the webfont service that was hosting the font I was trying to use created a subset that excluded the lining figures anyways, so I had ...


1

set your type duplicate it (so there's no a copy on top) on this new copy, set the stroke to whatever you want move this duplicated copy with stroke to the back done Optional: As vincent points out, you may need to tweak the outline to remove gaps such as where the dash would be. To do that: with your black-stroked text still selected, STROKE TO PATH ...


1

For the headline I would suggest Bitter Bold. I think that the headline could use a thick, serifed font for contrast with the body copy. Bitter got some pretty nice hard serifs so - in my opinion - it goes excellent with sans-serif paragraphs.


1

Your headline font should fit in with the font used in the logo, this is a good design practice. "Fitting In" could either mean mirroring the same look, or providing a suitable contrasting font partner instead. ChunkFive has no WebFont variation, but the google font Alfa Slab is similar in that it is a Slab Serif as well as having a very heavy weight. ...


1

Hold down the alt key and press 0149 on the numeric keyboard (at the bottom right of your keyboard), when you release the alt key, a bullet should appear in your text.Instead of using illustrator you can head for inDesign.


1

Upload a portion of your .bmp to https://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ and hope that the font can be recognized. Otherwise, find a similar font and go with that.



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