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89

They do. The thing is, you probably don't realise, because upper case numbers have been all you've been using or seeing. There is a distinction between 'default' numbers and 'oldstyle' numbers. The default numbers we all know are the actual capitals, with the 'oldstyle' numbers (sometimes incorrectly called 'proportional numbers') are lowercase. Fonts tend ...


54

It Started Curved The apostrophe first appeared in the printed universe in Italy, 16th century, as a curved shape to signify elision copied from handwritten classical Italian poetry. The apostrophe was equivalent to our "Gotchas" or "Wannas" in the sense that it was a way to take the stiffness of the text away by making it sound more human-like. Here is an ...


36

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


31

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


29

While upper case numbers do exist, as is shown in vincents answer. They did not originally exist at all. Remember our numbers are copied from the Muslim scientists, who wrote in Arabic.* Arabic is unicase, that is all letters are same case. So the notion of big and small numbers is a later development. Since the original system had no case so did the ...


23

Very rarely. Any time you claim to be a professional X, you're staking your reputation on a claim to have specific, comprehensive expertise in that profession. With typography, some graphic designers can justify such a claim, but most can't stretch that far. "Typographer" implies professional expert. Most good designers are adept at typography, and many ...


21

While I agree with a lot of what has been said, I disagree with one of the fundamental ideas everyone else seems to have--there are certain characteristics and treatments that makes something feel luxury and wealthy. I'm not sure I know them all, in fact I'm sure I don't, but here's what I've been able to identify since posting this question and really ...


19

This is called ligature. There is some useful background knowledge on Wikipedia In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph. Many ligatures combine f with an adjacent letter. The most prominent example is fi (or f‌i, rendered with two normal letters). The tittle of the i in ...


19

Did a bit of research to make sure, but in general "proper" typography doesn't use straight quotes, single or double. Here's a handy guide for the commands and HTML entities for single/double curly quotes. Typewriters are also responsible for the introduction of ‘straight quotes’, non-specific quote marks designed as a space-saving measure for the ...


18

Capital letters exist as our written and printed language has decided they should. The rules for usage of capital letters typically is for starting sentences and proper nouns. The rules simply don't apply to numerals. Hence, no need for there to be 'upper case' numbers. Your example of using ALL CAPS TO SHOW EMPHASIS is actually not an ideal way to show ...


17

Most politicians on camera are probably using teleprompters. Teleprompters don't use the more impressive typography. They are almost always white on black, with a big sans-serif font. Sometimes they are all caps-sometimes not. If the speech is printed, it was probably done by a speech writer or assistant, with little consideration given to typography at all ...


13

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


11

What is case? The discussion both in this question and in the one it inspired on ELU seems to conflate two distinct meanings of ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’: Based purely on shape and size, originating in whether a glyph was originally usually stored in the typographer’s upper or lower case (= drawer). Based on functionality, describing what upper- and ...


11

The Unicode Standard comments on U+2019 (’): this is the preferred character to use for apostrophe As far as what is right encoding-wise, I cannot think of a higher authority. Also, the typographical conventions of most languages do not use U+2019 for other purposes or only as secondary quotation marks. In fact, British English is the only major ...


10

"Hairline" generally refers to a stroke or line smaller then 0.25pt in width. Sometimes it may mean smaller than 0.5pt in width. "Hairline" is not directly associated with any type glyph and is not a term used exclusively for typography. A Hairline can be any line, any where.


9

Now there's always going to be circumstances where any classification of font can suit a luxury brand. But some font characteristics that I've noticed are: Serifs High/med contrast fonts; Modern typefaces (see Hugo Boss) Small caps Heavy tracking (see Marc Jacobs) Script fonts Ligatures Hand-drawn signature-esque writing (see Agnes B. Voyage) Very bold or ...


8

No, the spaces should not be bold because that would be bad semantics. A word or run of words can be bolded, but spaces around a word cannot. This is separate from any thoughts of visual design, and independent of any implementation. The semantics come from the writer. They are not up to the designer. The designer has visual design tools to do their visual ...


7

I do a lot of typesetting with LaTeX and use colour quite extensively in most of my documents. For my purposes, I use it in the following ways: Branding: This is probably the most common reason that I use colour, as frequently the documents I am writing are tied very specifically to an organisation. Especially with widely distributed documents, I want ...


7

What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


7

There is no common characteristics in the typefaces used. Any typeface can convey luxury and wealth, it all depends on how the type is used. Luxury brands convey "luxury" through use and message not any specific typeface. If you examine the work of some of the world's leading "luxury" brands you find there's practically no common characteristic between the ...


7

You can separate paragraphs a number of ways. Indents Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Curabitur in orci pellentesque, volutpat metus eget, interdum mauris. Nunc faucibus lectus id libero blandit, et varius augue vehicula. Cras eu dictum libero, a elementum velit. Fusce ultrices malesuada elit, et convallis massa tristique ...


7

You can do this with clipping masks. Pathfinder would also do this, as would compound paths. But presumably you want the text to stay editable. Do this make the clipping mask out of a square that has a circle on top of it and choose Object → Compound Mask → Make. you can then use this as a clipping mask. Thisway you get a inverse clipping mask. ...


7

I would suggest looking at the relation between the space below and to the right of the drop cap - whether the drop cap is a word in itself or not.


7

It's called a Ligature and is designed to aid in reading. You can customarily turn off ligatures via the OpenType Panel in Illustrator: You can also select the ligature and use the Glyph Panel to choose a different glyph if you'd like.


7

The design of italics is that they will stand out inside a regular font face, this means that they catch our eye more that the regular text. So a word with italic styli in a regular text will pop out and stand out. But when a large paragraph of the text is italic and only one word is with a regular font, the "noise" from the italic text is so hard that the ...


7

While this may not directly answer your titular question, I hope that it somewhat solves your problem: The following techniques helped me reducing the work on manually kerning a font (which was blackletter; so standard kerning pairs did not apply): By far the most important one: Use kerning classes. While your font may have a lot of glyphs, many of them ...


7

If you want a minus sign, use a minus sign. That's what it's for, after all. That being said—unless you are writing for a mathematical publication or in a similar context it probably won't go noticed if you do use a hyphen or dash. I know I have used a hyphen-minus or en-dash countless times in the past. As you mentioned in your question, there is no key ...


7

Imitation of an older convention It's clear that the designers of more recent currency symbols have their own rational for including the slahses or 'strikouts' in the symbol. It's also clear that these elements naturally evolved in older currency symbols through the use of abbreviation and shorthand. It's more than likely that modern currency symbols are ...


6

All of the answers (which are excellent) assume that you are correct, that your handwriting is "terrible". Perhaps not. Perhaps the secret for you is to stop being critical and just love the handwriting you have. Over time it will change, each of your idiosyncrasies may grow into extravagant flourishes or fade away. Who knows. That is part of the fun of ...


6

Ok, so it's not an exact solution, but it's definitely easier than drawing in the lines on a font that doesn't already have them. Start with your text Change the color of the text to white (or whatever your design's background color is) and then add an Inner Stroke of the color that you wish the font to be. And there you have it You can also ...



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