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39

Great question! A good place to start is the faceted search tool on Typekit, which gives options for the main types of typeface and the main dimensions they can be measured against: So you could look for Typekit options that seem to match, and try them out. As you choose descriptions you can instantly see the sort of fonts that come up, so you can tell ...


15

Fillerati Fillerama Gangsta Lorem Ipsum F*ck Lorem Ipsum Bacon Ipsum HTML Ipsum Loripsum.net LittleIpsum for OS X Professional Lorem Ipsum Generator Veggie Ipsum Hipster Ipsum Journo Ipsum Tuna Ipsum Samuel L Ipsum Charlie Sheen Lorem Ipsum The Web 2.0 Lorem Ipsum Generator Beer Ipsum Lorempixum Malevole GAG Ipsum Space Ipsum Cupcake Ipsum Zombie Ipsum ...


15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). I would also shorten the height of the lowercase ls. The additional height of the ls is throwing off the balance considerably. Reducing the height of the ls to match the hight of ...


14

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


11

NO, no, no, no, no. Double spaces are never necessary when using proportional fonts. Not if your sentences are one word each, two words each, two paragraphs each, or six pages long. The best way to typeset those two exact sentences in a proportional font is correctly: with one space after the period. Two spaces just makes my eye trip. Genuinely. I feel ...


10

Actually, this is Catull Regular with minor manual changes. It was created in 1982 by German designer Gustav Jaeger for Berthold. Also see this.


10

So, as Joonas mentions, the sign is apparently a capital letter L, with one or two crossbars to show that it is being used as a symbol or abbreviation. The L stands for the Latin word libra, the name of a Roman unit of weight, which also gave rise to the abbreviation lb for a pound as a measure of weight, and to the French word livre (source). The first £10 ...


9

Ok, three things: Single spaces after periods is recommended in the AP Stylebook, the Modern Language Association style guide and the Chicago Manual of Style. Go with that. Nothing is more distracting than something that looks like a grammar error, so single spacing is your best bet. That said, consistency is king. If you use double spaces after periods, ...


8

Probably the best way to understand and get a feel for a 'normal' pound sign is to practice handwriting them, until you've got a sense of what comes naturally from the essential form and what is within normal variation. As I learned it as a UK schoolkid (this is me thinking step-by-step about what I do when I do it without thinking about it, so may not be ...


8

Unicode number: 24B6 HTML-code: Ⓐ Ⓐ You can easily visually search unicode characters here: http://unicode-table.com/en/ And for some basic shape recognition you can use Shapecatcher.com to draw the character you are looking for. It's not always fabulous at finding the right character (it didn't work in this case), but it can help in some ...


8

If you ask someone in the publishing world what they are called they will point you to what's called a "Chapter Ornament" or a "Book Ornament". If you want to get further technical on the design process, book designers will refer to them if they are at the beginning of a chapter as a "Chapter Heading Ornament" or at the end of the chapter as a "End of ...


7

So you have a few options, usually. At the moment, your problem is that lines 1 and 2 look further apart than lines 2 and 3, even though they're not. It's an optical illusion created by the lack of descenders and ascenders between the first two, but not on the second two. The solutions fall into two basic categories: avoiding this situation all together, ...


7

As you identify, there are a number of issues and they all stem from your implementation of (or possibly how you're using) TeX. For a bald list, I cite the use of a Scotch Roman face poor letter spacing lines too closely-spaced poor mixing of fonts (sans and script) TeX's Scotch Roman face is old-fashioned and fussy. All those serifs! It's this ...


7

Beyond the basic structure of the form, I don't think there is a "normal" of any type character. It's all merely a typeface choice. Like a dollar sign, the Pound has the same basic structure, bottom and middle stroke with a vertical that curves to form the top stroke. After all what does a "normal" T look like??? Doesn't that all depends upon the typeface? ...


7

The way to approach a problem like this is through research and moodboarding - explore popular products in Brasil among the demographics and market your client is targeting, look for clues as to changing trends, explore things (in Brasil or anywhere) that have the kind of personality you want, assemble a big board (physical or digital) of examples of things ...


7

A typical principle for font pairing is contrast. If there's a sans-serif in the header, using a serif for the body copy is a great way to provide contrast. However, I don't think that principle applies here. The typeface in question is so funky, so quirky, and has so much style that it would probably benefit from a cousing that's a lot more simply drawn. ...


7

It's unfortunate that Khaled hasn't had a chance to respond here, but I'll give you my typographer response. As a general principle, I would strongly recommend sticking with the typographic conventions of each culture. Distorting letterforms (or choosing unusual typefaces that don't convey the same sense of formality as small caps do in English) is ...


7

There are different ways to classify typefaces. user568458 covers one way in their answer - big umbrellas like sans-serif and serif, and physical characteristics. This is a great start for someone, particularly if you're not all that interested in the nerdy details. But if you are interested in matching fonts, it helps to know some of the subgenres so you ...


6

Some tips which may help: Mixing all caps and word caps is a bad idea unless there is a specific design consideration. In your sample, it's just bad. Logos which consist of a standard typeface are often seen as uninspiring because the typeface can be seen anywhere. Like any symbol, as much care and attention should be given to any text. Often type should ...


6

Just changing the size to make the width the same but the height different is simply called "typesetting". Making sure that multiple lines (read: a paragraph) fit left-aligned, right-aligned, center-aligned, or block-aligned is called "justification". But since some of your lines only contain a single word, the terms you are probably looking for here are ...


6

Open Source Font Editors: FontForge gbdfed Bitmap Font Editor BirdFont Freeware Font Editors: Font Struct Bit font Maker Type light Font Constructor Raster Font Editor Commercial Font Editors: FontCreator Font Management: 25 Font Management Tools Reviewed Search results for font management: What is a good free font management tool for ...


6

Fontforge It can be a bit clunky on Windows and crash occasionally, but then it can do that sometimes on Linux, too. Keep backups. I edit all fonts directly in my Dropbox directory so I have access to a file history. Its user interface is strange and the author has no intention to fix that any time soon. Some parts of it, like the auto-hinting, are ...


6

Here's what I'd do in this situation: take the text of Ladle Rat Rotten Hut and run it through Google Translate for each of the languages you need. The text, translated, will be nonsensical (it's nonsensical anyway if you take the literal English meanings of the words), but separated into sentences and paragraphs. Copy and paste to a text editor in UTF-8 ...


6

I would not put anything in small caps, especially partial words. There is no logic to having any word ever be partially small caps. Since proper adjectives are not proper names, the first character should be uppercase, but nothing small capped. In the end using small caps for your scenarios would not improve readability and ultimately, that is the very ...


6

Things to consider: Larger inner margin not outer. A larger inner margin helps prevent text from being crammed into the gutter of the spine. If you don't leave ample margin for the inner side you may find it gets difficult to read text near the gutter with every additional page. Creep. Creep happens when books are bound. Each signature needs to be slightly ...


6

This is what's known as the "numero sign" or "numero symbol". It actually has its own unicode character: №. As such, it's considered a single character, not two. From Wikipedia: The numero sign or numero symbol, №, is a typographic abbreviation of the word number(s) indicating ordinal numeration, especially in names and titles. For example, with the ...


6

As plainclothes has said, the dash is composed of several em-dashes. One might call it a long dash... Dickinson is best known for writing brief poems, often untitled, consisting of short lines peppered with long dashes, which mark her out as a more modern voice among her contemporary 19th-century poets. [Daily Telegraph] ...or perhaps an anonymisation ...


6

Edit: btw Paul Rand was working with what is called swiss-style design. The way I see it; the grid get way too much attention. The examples you give are not really purely typographic style as such. The ability, training and possibilities of play is underrated. Creating a visual language like Rand did, is part of his - almost - cult status among designers ...


6

The CSS font-weight is influenced by Linotype numbering system. As you can learn from the wiki, every digit in the number describes different characteristic of the typeface and from this point CSS adopted Lynotype in part... The 100 to 900 system works for some fonts, but fails for other, thus you should always check this in advance before using particular ...


6

What you really want here is not actually available on the web: The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst, is widely held to be the Typographer’s Bible. It has been called “the finest book ever written about typography”, and it is. Accept no substitutes.



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