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43

Great question! A good place to start is the faceted search tool on Typekit, which gives options for the main types of typeface and the main dimensions they can be measured against: So you could look for Typekit options that seem to match, and try them out. As you choose descriptions you can instantly see the sort of fonts that come up, so you can tell ...


19

There are several reasons why you might end up kerning type. Well-made and carefully designed typefaces include a kerning table that provides applications with instructions on how to adjust space between letters when they are displayed in text. Unfortunately, there is no way to account for every single letter relationship at every single possible size. ...


17

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


16

There are two types of ligatures. Type 1: The reason ligatures exist is to prevent spaces between some letters which could disturb your reading flow. For example in some fonts "fi" overlap each other or especialy "fl". In order to find a solution for this problem, ligatures were invented, each becoming just one letter on the typeblock: Normal letters vs ...


16

Fifteen Centuries of Versals There are many ways to indicate the beginning (or resumption) of a section of text, including paragraph indents, blank lines, changing the weight or style of the opening part of the text, ornamentation like fleurons — and versals, a category that includes drop caps. A Manuscript Example Versals, also known as lettrines, ...


16

In Illustrator, you can use a Mesh Envelope distort to non-destructively warp text like this: Select your text object, then use Object > Envelope Distort > Make With Mesh... and add however many rows and columns you need to get the desired effect. I used 16 rows and 1 column in my example.


15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). I would also shorten the height of the lowercase ls. The additional height of the ls is throwing off the balance considerably. Reducing the height of the ls to match the hight of ...


12

By making the right leg of the A vertical the connection to the T can be cleaned up. This also helps to balance the logo, making the initial A more prominent (as prominent as the final C). In the logo below this is further reinforced by making the A a bit bolder than in your original logo.


12

No One Rule Fits All Situations This is all somewhat complicated, because it ties in with kerning support and font selection, and there is no one-size-fits-all answer that will serve for all situations. In my experience, ligatures are more apt to be needed in a tightly set serif roman or italic, not so much in a sans font. For more discussion and ...


11

There are a couple of problems: The sides of the A strokes need to be straight and parallel, to match the parallel edges of the other letters. The counters beneath the arms of T are very unbalanced. You can't do much about the spacing around the capital I (because C is curved), but they are better balanced. The C might still be moved left slightly, ...


9

I totally understand the frustration of being in weak in grids and typography, specially if you are a self taught graphic designer. To me this is very open ended question and that there is no right answer to point out for you. In my personal experience, it is how you train your eyes and get feedback from your fellow designers would certainly improve your ...


9

I would first ask myself, why is the client picking typefaces at all? Are there brand standards in place I have not been made aware of? For the record, there's nothing which states two or three or fifteen typefaces are too many for a logo. If designed well the quantity of typeface variation is irrelevant. If you can pull off a great logotype with six fonts ...


9

What do they mean? as explained here The BQ and BE OpenType Basic versions correspond to the Berthold BQ and Adobe BE PostScript Type 1 Legacy versions. What is the difference as explained here The Berthold BQ and Adobe Berthold versions are derived from the same data source and so the character outlines are almost identical. The metrics (spacing and ...


8

If you ask someone in the publishing world what they are called they will point you to what's called a "Chapter Ornament" or a "Book Ornament". If you want to get further technical on the design process, book designers will refer to them if they are at the beginning of a chapter as a "Chapter Heading Ornament" or at the end of the chapter as a "End of ...


8

The most condensed monospace, open-source font I've found is via fontsquirrel and is called M+ 1m.


7

The benefit of having your full name in a logo is that, well, your name is the logo. Nike has the benefit of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to train the public to know that a "swoosh" = Nike, but you don't have that luxury. Not yet, anyways! While using initials or symbols in logos can sometimes lead to more creative solutions or more distinctive ...


7

Edit: btw Paul Rand was working with what is called swiss-style design. The way I see it; the grid get way too much attention. The examples you give are not really purely typographic style as such. The ability, training and possibilities of play is underrated. Creating a visual language like Rand did, is part of his - almost - cult status among designers ...


7

This is what's known as the "numero sign" or "numero symbol". It actually has its own unicode character: №. As such, it's considered a single character, not two. From Wikipedia: The numero sign or numero symbol, №, is a typographic abbreviation of the word number(s) indicating ordinal numeration, especially in names and titles. For example, with the ...


7

There are different ways to classify typefaces. user568458 covers one way in their answer - big umbrellas like sans-serif and serif, and physical characteristics. This is a great start for someone, particularly if you're not all that interested in the nerdy details. But if you are interested in matching fonts, it helps to know some of the subgenres so you ...


7

It's unfortunate that Khaled hasn't had a chance to respond here, but I'll give you my typographer response. As a general principle, I would strongly recommend sticking with the typographic conventions of each culture. Distorting letterforms (or choosing unusual typefaces that don't convey the same sense of formality as small caps do in English) is ...


7

As a general recomendation I would suggest to add a bit more of negative space. You can get this by reducing your font size up to 10 or even 9 pt (don't be scared, it would be readable enough). At the same time I would reuse some of the space we've gained increasing line height; everything will look lighter and cleaner. You can also reduce a bit your name ...


7

No, usually not. This is a legacy of hardbound binding; these extra pages were glued to the cover and the inner pages, and do not count as "inner" pages. For a paperback, you don't need to explicitly add them. The page with the half-title is sort of a connector between the cover itself and the inner pages. Its use is (historically) to protect the real title ...


6

The font was designed to fit most cases so in most cases, your L would be preceded by another letter and so on. Good designers definitely pay attention to these small details, it really makes your design look more professional even if it is very subtle. If you are in InDesign, you won't be able to kern the first letter of a line so what you can do is simply ...


6

Some notes on possible improvements: The page uses eight different typefaces, and variation in font size and different content color and background color combinations. That makes a rather messy impression. Using two or three typefaces should normally be enough. Legibility is suboptimal. White text on dark background is less legile, and white text on light ...


6

Simple answer.. posed as a question... If the logo were not text, would you clip part of it when considering spacing? Don't let the fact that the logo happens to be a type glyph alter what you would do if it were not a glyph. Factor in the serifs as well.


6

The CSS font-weight is influenced by Linotype numbering system. As you can learn from the wiki, every digit in the number describes different characteristic of the typeface and from this point CSS adopted Lynotype in part... The 100 to 900 system works for some fonts, but fails for other, thus you should always check this in advance before using particular ...


6

In literature, it's called "onomatopoeia," so I'd coin "fontomatopoeia."


6

Things to consider: Larger inner margin not outer. A larger inner margin helps prevent text from being crammed into the gutter of the spine. If you don't leave ample margin for the inner side you may find it gets difficult to read text near the gutter with every additional page. Creep. Creep happens when books are bound. Each signature needs to be slightly ...


6

As plainclothes has said, the dash is composed of several em-dashes. One might call it a long dash... Dickinson is best known for writing brief poems, often untitled, consisting of short lines peppered with long dashes, which mark her out as a more modern voice among her contemporary 19th-century poets. [Daily Telegraph] ...or perhaps an anonymisation ...


6

What you really want here is not actually available on the web: The Elements of Typographic Style, by Robert Bringhurst, is widely held to be the Typographer’s Bible. It has been called “the finest book ever written about typography”, and it is. Accept no substitutes.



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