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88

They do. The thing is, you probably don't realise, because upper case numbers have been all you've been using or seeing. There is a distinction between 'default' numbers and 'oldstyle' numbers. The default numbers we all know are the actual capitals, with the 'oldstyle' numbers (sometimes incorrectly called 'proportional numbers') are lowercase. Fonts tend ...


34

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


31

Just some extra pointers to try to break from bad habits, since I think the previous answers are pretty thorough. Position the Paper Comfortably Pay attention to the position of the paper and modify it until you find the most comfortable position for you. Keeping the paper straight in front of you will force your wrist to strain and contort in order to be ...


30

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


29

While upper case numbers do exist, as is shown in vincents answer. They did not originally exist at all. Remember our numbers are copied from the Muslim scientists, who wrote in Arabic.* Arabic is unicase, that is all letters are same case. So the notion of big and small numbers is a later development. Since the original system had no case so did the ...


23

My advice as a parent Kids of that age don't read books, they look at books and enjoy the images, colors and stuff. Other people read those book to kids under the following conditions: Bad light (because it's bed time) The head of the kid in between the book and the reader A never steady book, because the kids like to help holding it As a result, use a ...


23

Very rarely. Any time you claim to be a professional X, you're staking your reputation on a claim to have specific, comprehensive expertise in that profession. With typography, some graphic designers can justify such a claim, but most can't stretch that far. "Typographer" implies professional expert. Most good designers are adept at typography, and many ...


22

The older convention was that the style of punctuation matched the immediately preceding context: That's the Chicago Manual of Style (3rd edition, 1911), but the same convention can be seen in a French equivalent: Désiré Greffier, Les règles de la composition typographique (Paris: A. Muller, 1897), pp. 54-55. And it's not only an older convention, as the ...


21

While I agree with a lot of what has been said, I disagree with one of the fundamental ideas everyone else seems to have--there are certain characteristics and treatments that makes something feel luxury and wealthy. I'm not sure I know them all, in fact I'm sure I don't, but here's what I've been able to identify since posting this question and really ...


19

This is called ligature. There is some useful background knowledge on Wikipedia In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph. Many ligatures combine f with an adjacent letter. The most prominent example is fi (or f‌i, rendered with two normal letters). The tittle of the i in ...


18

Capital letters exist as our written and printed language has decided they should. The rules for usage of capital letters typically is for starting sentences and proper nouns. The rules simply don't apply to numerals. Hence, no need for there to be 'upper case' numbers. Your example of using ALL CAPS TO SHOW EMPHASIS is actually not an ideal way to show ...


16

Most politicians on camera are probably using teleprompters. Teleprompters don't use the more impressive typography. They are almost always white on black, with a big sans-serif font. Sometimes they are all caps-sometimes not. If the speech is printed, it was probably done by a speech writer or assistant, with little consideration given to typography at all ...


14

Typography for children's books is much more complicated that only font size, you must consider the font, kerning, leading etc. Here's a very nice post that goes into detail regarding the basics that should help a lot! They recommend 14-18pt with 16 to 22pt leading and I agree, but read the entire post!


13

I think it's great that you're being so detailed. The smallest of details are noticed by the reader, even if it's just subconsciously. I'm sure there are a lot of different opinions, and I'm sure that in the end it comes down to personal preference, but I would say you only include formatting on elements that are part of the nested statement. This isn’t ...


13

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


12

Claude Garamond started designing typefaces in the 1500s, a time when both type design and technology was very different from today. Letters had to be cut into metal by hand, and so they were much more prone to imperfections and unevenness than today's digital type. Italics, in particular, were based on a different kind of writing, cursive, which was more ...


11

What is case? The discussion both in this question and in the one it inspired on ELU seems to conflate two distinct meanings of ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’: Based purely on shape and size, originating in whether a glyph was originally usually stored in the typographer’s upper or lower case (= drawer). Based on functionality, describing what upper- and ...


10

Some background on me, so you can estimate how much or little authority I have: My native language (German) uses diacritics (ÄÖÜäöü) as well as non-diacritical special characters (ß) and is in the process of introducing or rejecting a new special character (ẞ, the capital eszett) right now. I did some research on the diacritical characters myself for the ...


10

"Hairline" generally refers to a stroke or line smaller then 0.25pt in width. Sometimes it may mean smaller than 0.5pt in width. "Hairline" is not directly associated with any type glyph and is not a term used exclusively for typography. A Hairline can be any line, any where.


9

Semantically, the typeface of the punctuation should be determined by its degree of association with the preceding word. In the example given for the Chicago Manual of Style, the exclamation mark after Banzai! belongs to the word itself, rather than marking the end of the enclosing sentence, so it should clearly be italicized, but that doesn't mean that all ...


9

Here are a few things that have worked for me. Be comfortable Pick a pen you're comfortable with. A tool you enjoy. Ballpoint pen, pencil, fountain pen, whatever. This is important. Having fun boosts learning. Imitate Look at other people's handwriting, and pick a style you like. Try to copy that style a bit, but don't worry too much about not being ...


9

Now there's always going to be circumstances where any classification of font can suit a luxury brand. But some font characteristics that I've noticed are: Serifs High/med contrast fonts; Modern typefaces (see Hugo Boss) Small caps Heavy tracking (see Marc Jacobs) Script fonts Ligatures Hand-drawn signature-esque writing (see Agnes B. Voyage) Very bold or ...


8

Take a calligraphy course. Calligraphy literally means beautiful writing (from the Greek kalos "beauty" + graphein "to write"). When learning calligraphy, you will learn about the shapes of letters, different "hands" (italic, gothic, blackletter), how the nib (point) of the calligraphic pen produces different effects, and how to produce those effects ...


8

It's a lot like drawing......Muscle memory. Consciously and deliberately write the way you want to write .... then do it some more, then more, and even more. If you still feel it's ugly, keep practicing. Slow down and be even more deliberate. If it helps, use vellum or tracing paper and retrace the parts of your writing you do like. The important thing is ...


7

I've never seen a specific Chapter marker. It may be because commonly intra-chapter references are mainly to clarify the text inside a single chapter only, and each chapter may be supposed to stand on its own. Techniques range from highly abbreviated to highly wordy, e.g. Ch.1 Chap. 1 Chapter 1 See "Basic Introduction to Writing Long Texts" ...


7

What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


7

There is no common characteristics in the typefaces used. Any typeface can convey luxury and wealth, it all depends on how the type is used. Luxury brands convey "luxury" through use and message not any specific typeface. If you examine the work of some of the world's leading "luxury" brands you find there's practically no common characteristic between the ...


7

I do a lot of typesetting with LaTeX and use colour quite extensively in most of my documents. For my purposes, I use it in the following ways: Branding: This is probably the most common reason that I use colour, as frequently the documents I am writing are tied very specifically to an organisation. Especially with widely distributed documents, I want ...


7

You can separate paragraphs a number of ways. Indents Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Curabitur in orci pellentesque, volutpat metus eget, interdum mauris. Nunc faucibus lectus id libero blandit, et varius augue vehicula. Cras eu dictum libero, a elementum velit. Fusce ultrices malesuada elit, et convallis massa tristique ...


7

You can do this with clipping masks. Pathfinder would also do this, as would compound paths. But presumably you want the text to stay editable. Do this make the clipping mask out of a square that has a circle on top of it and choose Object → Compound Mask → Make. you can then use this as a clipping mask. Thisway you get a inverse clipping mask. ...



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