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0

To put it bluntly: "Don't use Photoshop to animate things." To elaborate: When you see, say, a movie in the cinema, it runs about 25 frames per second. Entire thing is more complicated, but let's say every frame contains 1/25s and that 1/25s is as well exposure time of each frame (Need to learn about exposure time?). When something is moving in front of ...


-1

You asked for the "best font". Do you mean how it looks on the screen (which screen? dpi? ...) or if it is easy to read (on screen and/or on printed paper?) or if is sizeable with no problems or ... I think there is no one "best font" (whatever you ment with that) for all theese situations. It depends if MAC and Windows do/can use the same font, it ...


2

This is an interesting problem. I can understand that aesthetically, you might prefer to see all letters in Small-Caps, but if the word(s) need a capital for the first letter (such as a city, name of a person etc), then it must have this for future proofing the content, or delivery in some other form. So, if, at some time, the style of the content is likely ...


5

The recommended sizes for print are 10-12pt however this is dependent on the typeface being used also as the structure (cap height, x-height, etc. (if you want more information on that this is a nice starting point) varies from typeface to typeface. For the body 11pt is typically a good size but you must remember to keep your audience at the front of your ...


5

For any print, regardless of format, the optimal legbility is around font size 11pt, with ~15pt leading and ~60 characters per line (including spaces). These are of course dependent upon your target audience and other factors (like Ryan mentions). An example would be a publication aimed at seniors: they will prefer a slightly bigger font. Of course, als ...


1

The problem with most greeked text that resembles real text is that people don't read. In the context of websites, I often find that I need to make it absolutely clear that "Hey, this page still needs real content!" To that extent, I've been using 'Xxxx' text: Xxxxx xxx xx xxxxxx xxx xx x xxxxx xxxx. Xxxxx xx xxxxx xx xxxxxxx xxxxxx xxx x xxx. Xxxx ...


6

The essence of good kerning is to achieve an even appearance to the letterspacing in a word. It's a visual, not a mathematical operation. There some really hifalutin' rules to this, but they tend to be more academic than practical unless you're experienced with typography and/or a type designer. Here's a basic rule-of-thumb kerning exercise that will get ...


1

Your design is great! If I were to publish, your book will be a standard I would try to achieve. Your introduction does your work no justice. My preamble to my answer is "It has been 20 years since I have opened a style guide for writing." At least I have some recent relevant experience: I'll spend hours reading articles, books, and web pages to research ...


2

I work with Chinese-English prints a lot and usually people use separate fonts for Chinese and English. And like Ryan said, if English uses serif fonts, then Chinese uses serif fonts, same for sans-serif. We don't use Chinese font for English text because Chinese font is double byte and often will display latin characters in a monospace manner (unattractive ...


-2

Mac:"Hiragino Sans GB" win/mac :"Microsoft YaHei","微软雅黑" http://www.lofter.com/


0

Forgive this answer as it doesn't directly address the question, but if you are truly this lost and this rebranding is important I would probably consider bringing in a local designer to at least consult with before you make any decisions. A few billable hours and they could at least give you some feedback and steer you in a good direction. No offense or ...


1

If your text is point text, or individual text objects, just use the Distribute Spacing options on the Align Panel You may need to choose Show Options from the Align Panel Menu to see the distribute spacing items.


0

Other than breaking the text up and distributing groups or letters/words, the justification panel might be able to help: Other software like Corel Draw might be able to provide a better solution, though.


2

I think the reality is you can do it either way. I would certainly try to use a font up front that supports English and Chinese, if that failed though I wouldn't lose any sleep over selecting a different font for the Chinese version. Just try to keep the overall feel the same between the two. If you use a simple sans-serif English font then try to find a ...


8

As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


1

what better way than to show in the browser? after all, that's where their going to be viewed. i'm a firm believer in building the browser, and this is just another tenet of it. at the most basic level, you can simply take a page of content you have now and swap the fonts out. this will vary on the font(s) and your methods, but not by much and nothing too ...


7

Really nice design! I think you definitely got the vibe right. Couple of things to consider: The email at the bottom, because the text is in the same font, it makes it a little difficult to read. If you made the first word bold, for example, that would separate it a little more. I find the alignment of the date and the word Lauantai a little confusing. ...


2

The height/width ratio depends on the particular typeface, some (e.g., Times Roman) being inherently narrower than others (such as Bookman). Many typefaces have Compressed, Condensed, Regular and/or Extended fonts in the family. Obviously the height/width average is very different for each. The range spans a wide spectrum from the incredibly narrow (Universe ...


5

The different parts of a corporate identity program can't designed in isolation. They are like the variables, object classes and functions you build into a piece of code, or the parts of an engine: they have to work together as a whole. For that reason, context is everything. A color can appear quite different in different surroundings, as many famous ...


2

Unless you are making a statement by the typeface you choose, you can do far worse then using Times New Roman for body with Helvetica for headlines. No one will think they are a great choose, but they are everywhere and will not give your company a bad image. So if the brand does not have a set of values that calls for a distinct choose of typeface, maybe ...


9

how do you present multiple examples to the team I agree with Vincent, but will be a bit more emphastic: You don't Your job is to present the best option and then back up that decision as you see fit. Avoid too many options if you can. One, maybe two is ideal.


10

Limit their options. Lots of people like to think they are knowledgable in design, or typography, because 'anyone can judge whether something looks good or not, right?'—while they aren't. Don't let them do your work for you. My advice would be to do your research and deliver three options (possibly four), and present those to them, nothing more. Do ...


4

I would start by saying keep an open mind. People don't tend to like change even if they have asked for it. I usually present typography in the way it's going to be used, for example if your company has a heavy typographic leaflet, create a new one and explain the benefits of such typeface. Don't just put the alphabet together and say here we go guys. Show ...



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