Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You can dynamically load text into Illustrator using an XML file. Using the Variables panel, you can import an XML file and use that to control the existence of objects, what images appear in linked image containers, and what text appears in a text frame. You can also control the data that appears in a graph. The typical workflow is to create a ...


2

The answer to most any "when should I use typestyle X" is: when it looks appropriate. That said, note that condensed faces are typically considered display faces. They're not necessarily meant for use as a text face, but rather for things like headers and headlines. Newspapers especially like them because you can fit a lot more into a headline with a ...


1

Create a scatter brush of a small black circle with random size and spacing. Also set the scatter to random, but make sure your seed values are 100% or greater. Here's what I get as a result of tweaking the scatter brush settings: You can then expand the brush and delete any of the dots you don't like (like the one's inside the "K," for example. (edit: ...


0

You could buy a hand writing practice book which can be found in the 'primary/elementary school area of a good stationary store. Use that to practice and you will find that it presents the opportunity of following correct letter formation and 'basic rules of handwriting' like writing within lines for example. Practice, practice, practice. You'll get there! ...


1

There's a chance that the handwriting style you learned is not one that suits your current purposes. I've found the books by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay to be helpful, particularly Write Now. Their suggested italic style is easy to learn. Try a variety of different writing implements and papers until you find ones you feel comfortable with. For me, that ...


3

All of the answers (which are excellent) assume that you are correct, that your handwriting is "terrible". Perhaps not. Perhaps the secret for you is to stop being critical and just love the handwriting you have. Over time it will change, each of your idiosyncrasies may grow into extravagant flourishes or fade away. Who knows. That is part of the fun of ...


0

You could make the balls and the text both compound paths, then use the text to remove from the balls layer, using the subtract path tool. Like you say, this would result in some balls being cut, but then you can ungroup the balls, zoom in and manually remove or replace any cut balls.


1

Assuming that you want lower case letters that are about 5 mm (almost 1/4") high try running a set of lower case letter "o"s across a page from your computer around this size and then attempt to write a message in your own handwriting over these o's. If these seems cramped, create another line of o's that are maybe 9 mm high and try writing over them again ...


3

What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


2

I have dysgraphia and I have much difficulty in writing legible characters at all. What has helped me the most was to use a different pen. To me the bulk of the pens are too thick and have a slide that I can't control, but I have found a type which has a much smaller tip and a scratching feeling when you pull it on the paper. This has helped me write much ...


3

Practice makes your handwriting better. This is different from what most consider calligraphy. But in fact handwriting is where it starts. My normal hand is pretty horrible but there is one universally useful thing: Write Slowly We all know what the letters should look like. By slowing the pace, you give yourself time to do it the way you are supposed to ...


25

Just some extra pointers to try to break from bad habits, since I think the previous answers are pretty thorough. Position the Paper Comfortably Pay attention to the position of the paper and modify it until you find the most comfortable position for you. Keeping the paper straight in front of you will force your wrist to strain and contort in order to be ...


7

Here are a few things that have worked for me. Be comfortable Pick a pen you're comfortable with. A tool you enjoy. Ballpoint pen, pencil, fountain pen, whatever. This is important. Having fun boosts learning. Imitate Look at other people's handwriting, and pick a style you like. Try to copy that style a bit, but don't worry too much about not being ...


7

It's a lot like drawing......Muscle memory. Consciously and deliberately write the way you want to write .... then do it some more, then more, and even more. If you still feel it's ugly, keep practicing. Slow down and be even more deliberate. If it helps, use vellum or tracing paper and retrace the parts of your writing you do like. The important thing is ...


4

You don't really need a calligraphy course. I've been doing calligraphy since I was a kid, learning from books. Many calligraphy books teach extremely well. Calligraphy, however, is not necessarily practical, because it requires the use of a calligraphy pen. You don't have the kind of tips calligraphy pens have with regular pens and pencils. I ...


6

Take a calligraphy course. Calligraphy literally means beautiful writing (from the Greek kallos "beauty" + graphein "to write"). When learning calligraphy, you will learn about the shapes of letters, different "hands" (italic, gothic, blackletter), how the nib (point) of the calligraphic pen produces different effects, and how to produce those effects ...


0

Ok, I'll answer as a font designer: I think you need to have the font designed or design it to meet your requirements. In the image you are submitting of what you're looking for, the lowercase "g" and "y" (etc) are not typographically "correct", meaning, they do not respect typographical conventions for lowercase letters and are not pleasing to the eye of ...


0

since they are of considerable contrast That's pretty much it. It's not a science. It's "what looks good to the trained eye" is all. Typefaces that are very similar often work together, as do typefaces that contrast well. It's that middle area in between where they don't always succeed as well. So, a slab serif and a serif might different enough to ...


1

I'm still learning and practicing with font combinations myself, but I go to inspiration sites for reference like typ.io. The most common serif typefaces people chose to use with geometric fonts seemed to be rounder and have larger x-height, much like many geometric typefaces. Georgia was one example. It would also probably depend on whether the geometric ...


0

The most practical way to approach this is to apply the following rules: 1) Less is more. If you can get away with one typeface and add contrast, that's even better. 2) Trial and Error. Somethings look nice on illustrator, but not as good on a website or on paper, so it's difficult to have a general rule for pairing and laying out typefaces. The best way ...


1

The term I think you're looking for is 'tag cloud', or 'word cloud'. The average tag cloud doesn't regularly include custom shapes like the arrow on the lower left of your example, but the term is close enough. It seems you can create great word clouds with Wordle.


3

Those are usually mean word clouds. You can use this site easily for creating a word cloud.


0

what part are you having trouble with in the tutorial? Well the tool does as it describes, If you use the Envelope Distort tool then well it will distort the text based on how you move the anchor points. Another way to shape your text is to use Effect -> Warp -> (Choose your effect). Maybe Arc will work if you want to bend the text.


0

I don't know if you can change pixel to inch in Adobe Illustrator, but when I need to convert pixels to inches in Photoshop I'm using this web tool to convert inches to pixels, then create a new file with the obtained dimensions.


0

No, that's always been an issue with sketch and toon. What you can do is export paths to illustrator, then in illustrator bring the 3D layers forward, in front of the generated lines. Here is a video tutorial on how to do that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cs6SI7xLjKE


2

I would check out Typekit: Script fonts with low contrast I would also check out the medium contrast fonts. Also check out Designmodo article: Script Fonts: Most Popular Typefaces, Best for Webfonts. Note that these fonts can also be used for desktop. Some of the notable script fonts that have even strokes from the article. Thirsty Script Aphrodite Pro ...



Top 50 recent answers are included