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1-Its depends on the given matter. 2-Different section of text use in one banner its seems clumsy. 3-No matter which text is used and the thing is text character describe the information. 4-And the best way to represent the texts in one banner is playing with them in clever manner, 4.1- Size of main text with their relative text character 4.2- Text color ...


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It seems that single story "a"'s are rare in serif typefaces except for italic versions. Most sans serifs also use double story "a"'s except for geometric typefaces (which are usually used for display). At text sizes the single story "a" can appear too similar to an "o" and break the fluidity of reading.


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One type family won't kill your design Hierarchy can be communicated via numerous devices: Size, weight, color, position, and surrounding elements all contribute to perceived hierarchy. A change in typeface just says "something changed" — it doesn't necessarily establish order. In this sample the head and subhead are the same size (if you don't ...


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Overall I find remaining consistent with typefaces helpful, but vary the faces. Use different faces (bold, italic, black, etc.) to create visual separation in conjunction with size. First I'd determine what the imperative information is. If there are several of these banners, all focusing on the same talk but varying in date and topic, then the topic and ...


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I do hours and hours of editing and translating in front of a computer all day, and my experience is that for such text-heavy work, light text on a dark background (for me, either white or a very light green on a black background) leaves me less fatigued, noticing far less strain on the eyes. Doing such intensive, long editing and translating with dark text ...


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You can use this short little snippet of a script: #target illustrator function ChangeTextContents(){ if(app.documents.length > 0 && app.documents[0].selection != null){ var newText = prompt("Enter new text:", ""); if(newText != null){ var sel = app.activeDocument.selection; for(var i=0; ...


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This is the professional work done by the professional designer.To create this effect on fonts need professional skills and experience.. Here i share with you a different variety of typography tutorials hope that this link helps you to furnish your skills. ...


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If you're concerned with readability and distinct letter forms, and not so much with style, then the Dyslexia font (and others like it) might be worth considering. http://www.dyslexiefont.com/en/dyslexia-font/


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Are there scientific experiments, measurements on these? Yes! But... They are usually inconclusive use an incredibly small sample of users are overly narrow in scope tend to lack a lot of context tend to ignore all the other aspects that go in to readability So, I wouldn't put much weight into it at least on the broad "what is the best typeface" ...


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Very good question. And a very complex one. I just make some general statements. 1) Serif letters on printed media are easier to read with small line height spacing. (probably too on a high definition device) Proportionally sans serif fonts need more line height so the eye can keep track of the line its reading. The main reason is that the serif helps ...


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There is no general answer for this but typically bold, capitalization or even all caps, and a color change would be a good starting point. We've worked hard to ensure Delightful Apple Cake is the best pre-packaged apple cake available. Capitalization alone makes it more apparent We've worked hard to ensure Delightful Apple Cake is the best ...


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In Adobe Illustrator the best way to fake an Italic, on a sans-serif font, is to Shear as others have said but also then reduce the kerning. I find for most sans-serif fonts a 10degree horizontal shear, and -10 kerning is very very close to what an Italic would be. Again for sans-serif fonts. Here's an example using Source Sans Pro and Arial. Top is the ...


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I am quite a newbie at Ai so came to the thread looking for answers to the same question. I also couldn't be bothered looking for THE font as I just wanted to slant the font I had already picked. I found out that if you type your text in MS Word and "italicise" it you can copy and paste it into Ai and it keeps its shape. Ai doesn't recognise what font it is ...


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While I agree with a lot of what has been said, I disagree with one of the fundamental ideas everyone else seems to have--there are certain characteristics and treatments that makes something feel luxury and wealthy. I'm not sure I know them all, in fact I'm sure I don't, but here's what I've been able to identify since posting this question and really ...


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There is no common characteristics in the typefaces used. Any typeface can convey luxury and wealth, it all depends on how the type is used. Luxury brands convey "luxury" through use and message not any specific typeface. If you examine the work of some of the world's leading "luxury" brands you find there's practically no common characteristic between the ...


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What characteristics should a font have to also be associated with luxury and wealth? It should have the characteristics of fonts that others use with luxury and wealth brands. In other words, there's nothing particular about the type itself that makes is applicable to luxury and wealth, but rather how luxury and wealth brands have used type before is ...


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Now there's always going to be circumstances where any classification of font can suit a luxury brand. But some font characteristics that I've noticed are: Serifs High/med contrast fonts; Modern typefaces (see Hugo Boss) Small caps Heavy tracking (see Marc Jacobs) Script fonts Ligatures Hand-drawn signature-esque writing (see Agnes B. Voyage) Very bold or ...


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I think the second one is Edwardian Script ITC and in this case it's the one which associated with luxury and wealth but the first one Segoe Script Bold is even not associated with luxury and wealth. It's important how people know fonts and how they remember. Observation and research needed to find out what concept, expression a font is associated. Usually I ...


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Characters are what stored in text files, processed by applications, and moved around, while glyphs is their visual representation. To have a clear picture, lets see what happens when an application tries to render a string of text on the screen (in a bit simplified way): The application first read the text string, that it the string of characters stored ...


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Glyphs relate to how text is rendered, characters to how it's interpreted. When you copy&paste, the source application usually gives a choice of several formats. Plain text will decompose the fi ligature into f and i, HTML format may translate it to the char entity you quoted or also decompose it in f and i. In general the relation between characters ...


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Here is a little script that does, what you want to do: #target InDesign if(!(app.selection.length == 1 && app.selection[0] instanceof TextFrame && app.selection[0].overflows)){ alert("Error\rSelect exactly one text frame with overset text and try again."); exit(); }; var tf = app.selection[0]; var increment = 1; var ...


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Looks like it's not possible. The only way I could see it is you overlap your textbox above your frame to get the same effect.


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I don't have facts to back up my claims but I think part of it has to do with placing text in an area for legibility reasons. You will usually find text graphics in 2 main locations. The back of the windshield and the front driver & passenger doors. The back windshield being the prime location for any graphic. I believe the the second best location would ...


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You may also want to keep that blank space transparent. To achieve that just change the Fill of your text layer to 0% And this is the result.


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Ok, so it's not an exact solution, but it's definitely easier than drawing in the lines on a font that doesn't already have them. Start with your text Change the color of the text to white (or whatever your design's background color is) and then add an Inner Stroke of the color that you wish the font to be. And there you have it You can also ...


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You can dynamically load text into Illustrator using an XML file. Using the Variables panel, you can import an XML file and use that to control the existence of objects, what images appear in linked image containers, and what text appears in a text frame. You can also control the data that appears in a graph. The typical workflow is to create a ...


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The answer to most any "when should I use typestyle X" is: when it looks appropriate. That said, note that condensed faces are typically considered display faces. They're not necessarily meant for use as a text face, but rather for things like headers and headlines. Newspapers especially like them because you can fit a lot more into a headline with a ...


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Create a scatter brush of a small black circle with random size and spacing. Also set the scatter to random, but make sure your seed values are 100% or greater. Here's what I get as a result of tweaking the scatter brush settings: You can then expand the brush and delete any of the dots you don't like (like the one's inside the "K," for example. (edit: ...


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You could buy a hand writing practice book which can be found in the 'primary/elementary school area of a good stationery store. Use that to practice and you will find that it presents the opportunity of following correct letter formation and 'basic rules of handwriting' like writing within lines for example. Practice, practice, practice. You'll get there! ...


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There's a chance that the handwriting style you learned is not one that suits your current purposes. I've found the books by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay to be helpful, particularly Write Now. Their suggested italic style is easy to learn. Try a variety of different writing implements and papers until you find ones you feel comfortable with. For me, that ...


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All of the answers (which are excellent) assume that you are correct, that your handwriting is "terrible". Perhaps not. Perhaps the secret for you is to stop being critical and just love the handwriting you have. Over time it will change, each of your idiosyncrasies may grow into extravagant flourishes or fade away. Who knows. That is part of the fun of ...


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You could make the balls and the text both compound paths, then use the text to remove from the balls layer, using the subtract path tool. Like you say, this would result in some balls being cut, but then you can ungroup the balls, zoom in and manually remove or replace any cut balls.


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Assuming that you want lower case letters that are about 5 mm (almost 1/4") high try running a set of lower case letter "o"s across a page from your computer around this size and then attempt to write a message in your own handwriting over these o's. If these seems cramped, create another line of o's that are maybe 9 mm high and try writing over them again ...


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What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


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I have dysgraphia and I have much difficulty in writing legible characters at all. What has helped me the most was to use a different pen. To me the bulk of the pens are too thick and have a slide that I can't control, but I have found a type which has a much smaller tip and a scratching feeling when you pull it on the paper. This has helped me write much ...


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Practice makes your handwriting better. This is different from what most consider calligraphy. But in fact handwriting is where it starts. My normal hand is pretty horrible but there is one universally useful thing: Write Slowly We all know what the letters should look like. By slowing the pace, you give yourself time to do it the way you are supposed to ...


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Just some extra pointers to try to break from bad habits, since I think the previous answers are pretty thorough. Position the Paper Comfortably Pay attention to the position of the paper and modify it until you find the most comfortable position for you. Keeping the paper straight in front of you will force your wrist to strain and contort in order to be ...


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Here are a few things that have worked for me. Be comfortable Pick a pen you're comfortable with. A tool you enjoy. Ballpoint pen, pencil, fountain pen, whatever. This is important. Having fun boosts learning. Imitate Look at other people's handwriting, and pick a style you like. Try to copy that style a bit, but don't worry too much about not being ...


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It's a lot like drawing......Muscle memory. Consciously and deliberately write the way you want to write .... then do it some more, then more, and even more. If you still feel it's ugly, keep practicing. Slow down and be even more deliberate. If it helps, use vellum or tracing paper and retrace the parts of your writing you do like. The important thing is ...


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You don't really need a calligraphy course. I've been doing calligraphy since I was a kid, learning from books. Many calligraphy books teach extremely well. Calligraphy, however, is not necessarily practical, because it requires the use of a calligraphy pen. You don't have the kind of tips calligraphy pens have with regular pens and pencils. I ...


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Take a calligraphy course. Calligraphy literally means beautiful writing (from the Greek kallos "beauty" + graphein "to write"). When learning calligraphy, you will learn about the shapes of letters, different "hands" (italic, gothic, blackletter), how the nib (point) of the calligraphic pen produces different effects, and how to produce those effects ...


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Ok, I'll answer as a font designer: I think you need to have the font designed or design it to meet your requirements. In the image you are submitting of what you're looking for, the lowercase "g" and "y" (etc) are not typographically "correct", meaning, they do not respect typographical conventions for lowercase letters and are not pleasing to the eye of ...


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since they are of considerable contrast That's pretty much it. It's not a science. It's "what looks good to the trained eye" is all. Typefaces that are very similar often work together, as do typefaces that contrast well. It's that middle area in between where they don't always succeed as well. So, a slab serif and a serif might different enough to ...


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I'm still learning and practicing with font combinations myself, but I go to inspiration sites for reference like typ.io. The most common serif typefaces people chose to use with geometric fonts seemed to be rounder and have larger x-height, much like many geometric typefaces. Georgia was one example. It would also probably depend on whether the geometric ...


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The most practical way to approach this is to apply the following rules: 1) Less is more. If you can get away with one typeface and add contrast, that's even better. 2) Trial and Error. Somethings look nice on illustrator, but not as good on a website or on paper, so it's difficult to have a general rule for pairing and laying out typefaces. The best way ...



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