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"I notice that sites and software with less superficial value (less style, inspiration, or simply "neat-ness") often succeed far above their fantastically, well-designed counterparts": sorry, this is a very subjective statement that needs clarification before it can be discussed. Of course interfaces need to "look good". We are living in a world of ...


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User Experience is based on several things, but the foundation of a positive user experience where interfaces play a key role (meaning, users are going to actually interface with it in an active manner) is in the 'logic' of its design. Is it INTUITIVE? Does the placement of XYZ make sense? Are people getting lost trying to figure out how to navigate? Can ...


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Key principles to achieve a good interface with complex content... I am here going to assume more of an application than a standard company website (what, where, who, when). First; as indirectly mentioned in a comment above; make things as simple as possible but not one bit simpler. The article In defence of hard has some really good points in that ...


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It depends Visual nuances have a different level of importance depending on where you are in your project, the type of project you're working on, and the number of people it reaches. For websites that are primarily tools it's all about the general features. Once they've reached a certain number of users the small things tend to matter, especially in the ...


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Just putting in my two cents: No, it is not universally important for an interface to look good (which is vague and impossible to measure anyway). However, some interfaces must have certain looks. The "look" of a site is similar to how you'd dress for job. You wouldn't paint houses in a business suit, nor would you wear cargo pants and a mask as a CEO. ...


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I need to design an interface that clients don't have to spend more than a few minutes learning to use, but still offer advanced control of the the features that the application offers. These, I would argue, are unrealistic requirements. At least, they are unrealistic until some user research is performed. So that's where I'd start. The design ...


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So far, some good practices have been displayed, however, possibly due to my own failure to properly elaborate in the question, no one has described how to decide how some key design principles can be applied to the interface's design based on the specific situation described. By using a few unspoken key design principles that most any artist understands, ...


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As with everything, context is critical. If we're talking an emergency shut off valve at the gas pump, no, the 'little things' probably aren't important at all. Focus on the big thing "Make it obvious and large" is all you need. If, on the other hand, we're talking about differentiating a product in the marketplace, then it's pretty much entirely about the ...


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I think you're looking at the question wrong. It's not a matter of "smaller things" or details being automatically more or less important than the broad aspects of colour and layout. It will always depend on the specific detail you're talking about. I think you get closer to the key issue when you ask Can they be useful in any and every situation to ...


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In a way, I think you have the cart in front of the horse. There is the old saying; if you take care of the pennies, the pounds take care of themselves. Of course, you need to be able to step back from details to see the whole now and again, but the devil is in the details. To quote the Master; da Vinci: Details make perfection, and perfection is not ...


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Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other ...


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Having minimal buttons is the signature of a clean and simple interface. Find your top few interactions and give them buttons so they can be 1-click operations. If those interactions have advanced features, give them a toggle/dropdown/submenu of some sort, ideally 2-click operations. Anything you expect your users to rarely click can be deeper in the ...


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To make your application easy to understand, use common elements and symbols that people are familiar with, rather than making them learn new symbols. Organize the system so that it walks the user through a process (e.g. step 1 should clearly navigate to step 2). Keep your navigation consistent (e.g. always keep your "save to draft" and "submit" buttons in ...


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Focus on meaning. Here are some thoughts: To make something meaningful, you need to profile your target user: What does she know about this new task? Are there similar tasks (perhaps from other domains) that can acts as metaphors or illustration? Simplicity should be the result of making things meaningful. Don't focus on simplicity. Simplicity can hide ...


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I agree very much with user568458. Form Follows Function To expand however on his/her answer: Budget Constraints In the "real world" budget is everything. Its why the vast majority of new website based companies fail. They make it slick and hip rather then focusing on Sales & Profits. For those that have said a company can't be judged just be users. ...


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It highly depends upon the application. If its an application with a lot of other eye catchy alternatives readily available, then yes, your interface needs to look good but if it is something unique and intuitive, users might not pay that much attention to GUI, rather they would focus on the functionality of your application.


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I think that everyone so far has gotten tied up with taste, design principle, and /or opinion, while the question, if you guys take a look at the title, is actually a pretty objective one. Do interfaces really need to look good? While "Looking good" is indeed a matter of opinion, the world clearly demonstrates over and over and over again, that while ...


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In my opinion, first of all they should work properly. If they do, the next step is their look. So basically, for people who use them continuously and they're happy with working, the look doesn't matter. In the same time for every rookie folks the look has a big impact. I think this is the most important factor. It decides if they'll stay a bit longer or ...


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Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


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Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


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In my opinion, a designer should never always design anything in any way! I've been designing professionally for a few years now, and every time I have designed a product it has been, first and foremost, to meet the requirements of the client - be it a website, app, email template or other interface. If the client wants a subtle, flat interface (in line ...


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You ask how? For many people there are many different ways. This is what I do: Write down the functions of your application. Then start putting the functions into "categories", for example: functions: chat, add friends, ignore list, play video. I can put "chat", "add friends" and "ignore list" into the same category, because they are related. After ...


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The most important thing I always find is usability, put yourself into the shoes of your users. So if the buttons are in the right place, people can find everything and the use of your OS/Website/App/etc. is smooth. I think some users look more closely to the design of an application then others, but they all demand that it works well, or that there is ...


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The icon used for religious places will differ from country to country. Usually unique symbols that represents each religion is used. Here is an example from a Sri Lankan map where it's 4 dominant religions are represented with 4 different icons. I'm not sure how universally accurate this is, but in most countries putting your hands together symbolizes ...


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Even Google Maps does not have a single symbol: Patrick Hoffman is a user experience designer for Google - including Maps: "Google Maps visitors probably don't think twice about the little pictures that dot its maps, but an icon's creation can be a fraught process, he says. "Some of the best landmarks are places of worship because they tend to ...



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