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21

Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


20

Yes, this question is incredibly broad. Maybe it's OK as a wiki article. For starters, you need to define 'we'. There are many, many people and roles involved with designing web sites and they all tend to have different common mistakes. Here are some issues I've seen that seem to pop-up over and over again: Failing to properly define the business' ...


16

I think all you need to do is change your text color to White:


15

Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


9

Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other ...


7

The problem with your link is proximity and emphasis. If you want people to notice it you need to add design to the entire page such as background colors to direct the user to different parts. That is a starting point for adding emphasis to the Upload Prenda. Depending on what you do with backgrounds, graphics, and the design you may also need to adjust ...


5

I think that it's not immediately obvious that they're links. Nothing wrong with that though and they'll realise if they hover over it. I'd just add a fail-safe option where you've put [...] as a standard (blue) HTML link saying Read More or something similar. Nothing wrong with two links to the same content.


5

When Mac applications come with their own fonts, you can often find these within the application package (which is technically just a folder): Right-click on the application icon within the Applications folder and choose Show Package Contents. A new Finder window containing subfolders will open. Instead of rummaging each and every subfolder for the font ...


5

Finding excellent designers are hard. Not because they are few, but because the MAIN thing is how you & the designers communicate, get along, like each other, understand each others standpoint and language, how the designer envisions your aims. Find designs you like, and find out who did it. Collect samples of what you like, so you have something to ...


4

There are two JavaScript libraries that you might find helpful for pulling something like this off: Raphael.js Processing.js Otherwise, there are many, many charting libraries that you could adapt, some Flash, some PHP, some jQuery. Digg used to do some really cool visualizations in Digg labs, but unfortunately, all that remains now after their redesign ...


4

You're right with the colours not enough for the scenario - there is not enough contrast for it to be easily readable. Heres a good read on wording too, which might be of use - I would steer away from thge wording 'Oops' too :-) http://uxmovement.com/forms/how-to-make-your-form-error-messages-more-reassuring/ For the colour - I would recommend a ...


4

To a degree the question of color can be more about aesthetics which is more suited to the GD stack exchange. However, from a usability standpoint, the most important issue when dealing with light or dark backgrounds is making sure the element has sufficient contrast. To that end, I would suggest using something like this color contrast tool to measure ...


4

Any high contrast color would work based on your image. It does not have to be red or a form of red/pink. A yellow, orange, lighter blue, violet, etc would all work. The only thing I would do is avoid green to stay away from a "success" impression. You can easily taylor the alert to match any existing color scheme you may be using. The key is to simply keep ...


4

I think that everyone so far has gotten tied up with taste, design principle, and /or opinion, while the question, if you guys take a look at the title, is actually a pretty objective one. Do interfaces really need to look good? While "Looking good" is indeed a matter of opinion, the world clearly demonstrates over and over and over again, that while ...


4

I agree very much with user568458. Form Follows Function To expand however on his/her answer: Budget Constraints In the "real world" budget is everything. Its why the vast majority of new website based companies fail. They make it slick and hip rather then focusing on Sales & Profits. For those that have said a company can't be judged just be users. ...


4

In a way, I think you have the cart in front of the horse. There is the old saying; if you take care of the pennies, the pounds take care of themselves. Of course, you need to be able to step back from details to see the whole now and again, but the devil is in the details. To quote the Master; da Vinci: Details make perfection, and perfection is not ...


4

I think you're looking at the question wrong. It's not a matter of "smaller things" or details being automatically more or less important than the broad aspects of colour and layout. It will always depend on the specific detail you're talking about. I think you get closer to the key issue when you ask Can they be useful in any and every situation to ...


4

As with everything, context is critical. If we're talking an emergency shut off valve at the gas pump, no, the 'little things' probably aren't important at all. Focus on the big thing "Make it obvious and large" is all you need. If, on the other hand, we're talking about differentiating a product in the marketplace, then it's pretty much entirely about the ...


3

I don't know if this is a viable option for you, but I would alter the styling so that it's clear which rows are children. Instead of two colors for the zebra striping, I would use four. I would also use nested tables: There is still a even/odd collision, but it's still readable to me this way. Here is how it would look collapsed: JSFiddle demo


3

1) Yes, "Flat" should be the universally-understood umbrella term that you use to search on - but not sure of a term to describe the "oversized" nature of some of the components. (The "Flat" term basically just says: "Hey this is not skeuomorphic." [Skeuomorphic trend uses gradients, shadows, textures and other details to try to mimic real-world objects ...


3

Color continuity always helps design. Using the same color as the header background is a good choice. There's enough contrast to read the links clearly and the color differentiates the links from the standard headers ("Latest blog posts").


3

Build a simple interactive prototype I like to work with the developers from the start to make sure we're exploiting every possible advantage. Since we're already collaborating, building a rough prototype is no sweat. I've also worked with simple image-based prototypes but there's too much hand holding and explanation. The user never gets immersed.


3

Allrighty - I´ll jump in. You could simply use smiley-faces, or you could use a coloured bar of some sort. Another alternative is to simply colour the text, so that the least relevant is a paler colour. Target with or without dart. These examples are very crude, but I hope you get the general idea. Of course, you could combine them. (Should I come up with ...


3

I think a very common mistake in web design is evident on the mobile web. If you browse the web on a small mobile device, such as iPhone or BlackBerry, you will notice that sometimes the buttons are too small. Now this isn't always the button itself, but one mistake that is made is that there is often not enough room around the button. Lets assume we are ...


3

I am not a designer, but I have been in your position. I got lucky enough to get randomly assigned to a roommate who is a graphic designer so I keep him in my back pocket. But I have also been very happy with elance.com. There are other sites that do similar things as well. One elance you can look around to see what closed projects bid price was, try to ...


3

The W3AC provides standards for web accessibility of text. They require specific contrast ratios so it can be read by color blind individuals. If you know the #hex for your background colors and text colors for your website, it's as easy as inputting them to see if they are AA standards compliant. They can be accessed via Snook Color Contrast Check


3

The most important thing I always find is usability, put yourself into the shoes of your users. So if the buttons are in the right place, people can find everything and the use of your OS/Website/App/etc. is smooth. I think some users look more closely to the design of an application then others, but they all demand that it works well, or that there is ...


3

In my opinion, a designer should never always design anything in any way! I've been designing professionally for a few years now, and every time I have designed a product it has been, first and foremost, to meet the requirements of the client - be it a website, app, email template or other interface. If the client wants a subtle, flat interface (in line ...


3

Just putting in my two cents: No, it is not universally important for an interface to look good (which is vague and impossible to measure anyway). However, some interfaces must have certain looks. The "look" of a site is similar to how you'd dress for job. You wouldn't paint houses in a business suit, nor would you wear cargo pants and a mask as a CEO. ...



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