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19

There are many ways of approaching this. Your right a curve does not have to be made out of one piece, it can be built out of several pieces. In fact one curve can be built out of several curves. I have answered a similar question, about spiral caps, mostly the same applies here. When you do is you make a initial shape and then rotate and mirror it about. ...


6

The bad news: With automatic tracing algorithms alone, you won't be able to get a clean result. There will always be noise. The good news: If you're willing to invest just a bit of effort in manual cleanup, you can get a very decent vectorized reconstruction. This is what I was able to get in roughly 5 minutes: (Click on the image for a high-res version ...


5

Vector graphics is used differently than painting/drawing. You do not usually "draw" or sketch anything in a vector graphics software, your constructing a solution. Much like cutting paper for use as a mask. Most vector software do have a brush and pen tool, its just that it is entirely useless in terms of what your usually doing so you do not see people ...


5

Just going off of what I picture in my head that you are after. I would use a circular path, stroked, with a round cap: Select which Anchor Point(s) you'd like removed and delete: Add a round cap: Voilà: When you get your highlight how you want it, I would suggest expanding its appearance (Object > Expand). Edit I just realized that I made my ...


4

Yes. Just make sure you outline your type first. Right-click, Create outlines To add to Vicki's comment, I usually save my "working" documents (with editable text) as .ai files. I then save my outlined, print-ready designs as .eps or .pdf files, depending on which the printer asks for. That way, you can always go back and change something if need be, ...


4

give your text a stroke convert the stroke to path perform Break Apart path operation, Reduce the opacity to 25(so that the overlapping paths could be identified) Remove unwanted parts(the outer and lighter parts) for complex paths like 'A', 'O' remove the innermost and outermost path. select all the other paths and combine them(perform combine path ...


3

Alright I'll give it a quick whirl. I'm using https://unsplash.com/photos/VGpp0LcHZT4 as the image I'll start by Duplicating that layer a few times so I've got some copies of it and then I'm going to use the Median Filter. Median Filter is a great tool to find the average color of a region giving it almost a paint like quality. This first pass I'm looking ...


3

What a mess, to lift ourselves out of the rabbit hole we need to a bit of a lengthy explanation. Warning wall of text! TL:DR Pixelation is not defined so it descries many unrelated/related problems, so explanations vary. On pixelation People see different things for different terms for multiple overlapping things. When people use the term "pixelated" ...


3

Just to add to John's answer—If you are working with irregular shapes, you can use the Offset Path function (Object → Path → Offset Path...) to get the paths you need. Use a negative value to inset and a positive value to outset. Delete the parts you don't need, set a stroke etc:


2

From the Pathfinder panel use Unite to combine your shapes: (Illustrator Help / Combine objects using Pathfinder effects) Left: before / Right: after


2

First off: I am assuming that by "rounded polygon" you mean a "rounded rectangle". The effect you're observing is perfectly normal, since you're applying a scaling transformation to the entire object, which will distort/scale the object, including its stroke. The Problem Generally, you will distort/scale an object if you drag its bounding box or edit its ...


2

Pathfinder's Outline command will split your artwork in to its component line segments, essentially breaking apart you paths at any intersection. It won't break apart at every anchor point so you will need to manually cut any corner that isn't an intersection (use the Scissors Tool C), but in this specific case you should only need to cut the vertices of ...


2

Making your own limited exporter should be pretty easy if you know how to loop each shape and vertex. Now I personally can not help you with Sketch or Affinity editor since I have neither. But this is quite trivial to do in illustrator. On the other hand some tools like morphSVG will automatically fix these things for you. Though i do get that sometimes the ...


1

I don't know of any specific tool that will help you, but assuming the SVGs aren't overly complex I would just create the second by manually editing the first. Create your first SVG and save. Duplicate the file. Open and create your second SVG by only editing existing anchor points. As long as you aren't adding any more shapes or anchor points the number ...


1

First of all, you'll need a program with which to create vector graphics. Inkscape is a good option -- it's free/open source so you don't have to spend an arm and a leg on it either. There are great tutorials for it too. Get started by deciding what type of pose you want to make -- sketch out the basic shapes on paper first and get an idea where the arms ...


1

If you have a shape layer that you want to use as a mask for another layer you could just use a regular clipping mask like I describe [here]. A clipping mask is probably a better option but if you do want to use the shape as a vector mask you will need to copy the shapes path and use that as a mask. For example, I have an image and a shape layer: Use ...


1

This artwork you show is now already line copy. After it is separated it is plate ready. As it is already screened, there should be no moiré problems out of the ordinary rosettes formed by screens overlap. Coincidently, Your illustration shows the correct screen angles for CMYK printing. This image is already (coarsely) screened (or magnified). There is ...


1

There are two kinds of anchor points: Corner points (with no handles) and Smooth points (with handles). The handles control the curves and since corner points have no curves they have no handles. You can convert one kind of anchor point to the other in a number of ways: Use the Convert Anchor Point tool (SHIFT+C). With the Pen tool (P) active, Alt+Click ...


1

Your text is nested in a lot of groups, one of which is used by a clip path and is the cause of the truncation of the text. You can see it in the XML Editor: The fastest way to free your text is select it and keep hit Shift-Ctrl-G to ungroup until your text is no more grouped: Alternatively, you can change the size of the clipping rectangle.


1

Don't use the Pathfinder. There's no way to preserve the "thickness" of the ring when scaled. The thickness of your ring is an intrinsic part of the shape you made so it scales exactly the same as the rest of your shape.. The thickness literally is your shape. Instead use a single path with a stroke. You can then adjust your stroke as needed and you can ...


1

If you trace the bitmap with the Brightness Cutoff algorithm and threshold 0.3, you will get a nice rendering of the black strokes only. This will get most of the job done. Another trace with a higher cutoff will get you the whole head included. You can colour this second trace grey and layer it below the first black trace.


1

The graphic/bracket you're copying over has a white fill turned on whilst the bottom one has a transparent fill applied to the open path. It looks like a switch back to the default fill/stroke combo might have occurred in the file you're copying from. Switching to a transparent [/] fill while the object is selected should correct that.


1

You need to change the colorization method to 'Exact': You can change the colorization method for all colors in the Color Reduction Options dialog by clicking the button next to the presets. Also make sure you have 'Recolor Artwork' checked.


1

Threshold is your friend for turning complex, high-detailed photos into simplified black and white versions in Photoshop. Going from the threshold version will often give you better solid outlines to work over in vector illustration. This is just one technique, but it's one that I have been using before Illustrator introduced Live Trace, and one I still use ...


1

There are several raster image formats. Some can be opened with "any" "photo" viewer but others can not. For example a TIFF image is a widley used file format, but some features can not be opened with "all" viewers, like some types of compression or the multipage option. So, a photo viewer can only view the formats if it has implemented them. On the other ...



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