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I'm using Inkscape 0.91 r13725 on Debian 8 Go to: Filters => Blur => Cross Blur I left the Brightness at 0, Fading at 0 GUESSING that the gaps were 1 pixel I set Horizontal blur to 0.50 I set Vertical blur to 0.50 and there was noticable improvment, but not perfect. Hopefully this helps towards the perfection you seek. The image was too large for my ...


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There are a number of software suits that are used in the animation industry to assist in 2d animation. Two that are most commonly used and have been used by dozens of big animation studios including Disney and Nickelodeon are Toon Boom Animate and Anime Studio. Programs like this allow you to break up each model into individual parts - separate limbs and ...


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If you have Adobe Illustrator, you can do the following. Create a grid using the Rectangular Grid tool. Make a gradient mesh. Go to Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Mesh and select the number grid lines of lines you want to distort with. Use the direct select tool and grab the handle of the mesh to distort the grid.


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The biggest thing you can do is add an texture to the image. Subtle bumps can often give a feel of depth. I can't see the image you posted so that all the advice I can give.


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The problem is, there's no indexing of whether or no .pdf files contain either pixel or vector images. One can open up a .pdf using Adobe Illustrator, Affinity Serif, (or Inkscape if one wants a free solution), &c., but one won’t know until opening up the file how what it contains is represented in the file. Moreover, the contents of the image are ...


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Try http://www.sketchup.com/ Very easy 3d drawing program, easy to understand and use. If all you need is tehnical 3d, this can be very good for you.


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For PDF files outlining fonts is not necessary. With the proper PDF job options, fonts are embedded into the PDF as live type. This allows the font to retain it's original hinting data. See here for an explanation on hinting: When is font hinting used for print? With respect to this "girl on facebook".... A corrupt font is as likely to happen as a ...


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As far as I am aware, it is not at all necessary, assuming all fonts have been embedded. However, I will always include a rasterised (JPG) copy of the artwork when sent to the printers along with the PDF, Just to be SURE their software/RIP is rendering the pdf as expected. Never rely on "It's supposed to" - things corrupt, versions change etc. You can't ...


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With CC 2015, you have two preview options. Under View, you will see GPU Preview or Preview on CPU. To see a crisp high-res version, use the GPU Preview and not the Preview on CPU This makes your vectors appear crisp on screen and not pixelated. ;)


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Here is what I will suggest: Select the star shape with your favorite tool, like the magic wand, you will see the marching ants on the outside Create a new blank layer while the selection is still active Making sure the new layer is targeted, go to "Edit/Stroke" and add the desired stroke width, color, and whether it is on the inside, outside, or in the ...


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Autodesk Inventor and similar 3D CAD tools would make quick work of this sort of thing: http://www.autodesk.com/products/inventor/overview Inventor is free for startups making less than $100,000 / yr. http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/autodesk-sustainable-design-software-cost


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You can achieve the effect you desire using the 'pucker & bloat' dialog in 'Effect>Distort & Transform'. The only caveat is that is it will only work up to 3% bloat before the effect starts to turn your hexagon into a flower. 1. Start with your hexagon 2.Apply 3% Bloat 3. By 5% you will see inward facing nodes start to form at your vertices. and ...


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It looks like you want a hexagon that has symmetric handles at each node. I don't think there's any standard tool to do this, so use something like Effect > Pucker & Bloat with a value around 100%. Expanding this shape and adding points with Object > Path > Add Anchor Points gives you a shape with 12 nodes that has a nice amount of curvature in ...


0

There are a number of things you can try based on how the star was created. If it is on it's own layer, you can Control+Click (WIN) or Command+Click (MAC) to select the star on that layer. From there you can go to the Select Menu > Modify > Contract and choose a couple of pixels. Heads up though, this will round points and corners if you do it too far in. ...


1

After you draw your hexagon, use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow) to select the entire object. You should now see these little dots in each corner: Then all you need to do is go up to your menu bar and adjust the corner radii: You can get any radius you want and it can be adjusted smaller or larger at any time in the future. Edit - I just ...


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Once you have the shape selected you can go to (Effect > Stylize > Round Corners). You can then select the 'preview' button to get live changes.


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I'm using the latest version of Illustrator, so if this doesn't help then it maybe because of that, however when I create this shape and select the direct selection tool, you should see small selectable points within the shape that allow you to click and drag to make the corners rounded. If you don't see these, at the top of the screen is a small link called ...


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Additionally: You can import your .psd with layers in Illustrator in the new version of Illustrator. It should make the text in vector if you select "convert layers to objects." This is really only a "lifesaver." Photoshop is made to be used for images not vectors, but it has some basic vector tools as clearly mentioned in all the other answers and ...


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Open your .PSD with the layers in Illustrator. Then choose "convert layers to object." Not sure if it works with that version of Illustrator, and maybe you'll need to merge other layers together that can be rasterized... but it's worth trying. It works with the new Illustrator version though. It might not work for the objects or maybe you'll need to ...


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Select the layers that you wish to combine. Press the "Union" button in the tool bar, or from the to menu, choose Layer > Combine > Union. (You already got to this point, of course.) Layer > Paths > Flatten will merge the shapes into the same path.


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You change the dimensions of the artboard for every size Then Save > Save for Web and there you can can change the dimensions lossless


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There is no typical answer for your question, there is no rule, however you can follow you own methodology for the work, working with a template and graphic, text and paragraph style to ensure a consistency and unity for your work. For the aspect ratio: you should gather all your illustration graph and plots and find the best way to present it preserving ...


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While this not directly answers your questions, here is what I do (except for well-justified exceptions): Always work in the target journal’s style. For pure plots: For the first plot: Decide whether it should be a one-column or two-column plot. Adjust the height of what is plotted such that the information I want to convey is best visible and I also do ...


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If I understand your question well, you'd like to be able to easily have all your graphic elements all balanced and easy to insert in your main layout. First, know that it's way easier to plan ahead if you already have all your text and know what you're going to use. That gives you already good clues. For example... if you plan to always insert your ...


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There is no standard. Seasoned designers often understand the value of vector files and will often start with the vector format then generate raster format. The resolution independence of vector makes it almost automatically a "given" for a logo. A logo is most often sized and scaled a whole range of sizes. Starting with, or providing vector, just makes ...


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Theres no standard. There is no standards body outside Adobe who has mostly captured the GD market. This is graphics design not engineering, if it was engineering youd have several competing standards. The formats themselves have standards offcourse since that is engineering. It all depends on the industry, not yours, the clients. Clients in small business ...


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I'm not willing to say there is no standards. There's no standard if one wants to ignore them, as much as there's no standard in web development or any other profession then. If you speak to a print/prepress designer, they know the standards and it's anything that is the most compatible with the postscript technology and that will render the best print ...


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If its just applying styles to an SVG element/object, you can do that using CSS. Check out this totorial at smashingmagazine. Gives a complete overview on SVG styling using CSS.


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Beyond using effects, such as offset path, no it is not possible. The effect don't sound like they are what you are seeking.


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If I'm not mistaken, are you asking about changing the width between different anchor points in the shape? Something like the image below? One way to change the width of the stroke between anchor points is by using the width tool You can make it wider or thinner by going to a point where you want the change to start and hold-click, then moving up or down ...


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The Scissor tool is great for this. The default hotkey is "C". You can click anywhere on a path (in your case, on each anchor point) to effectively cut the path in that location, resulting in two paths. After that, you can simply direct select (hotkey "A") each path segment and adjust the stroke accordingly.


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What you can do is import your image in Illustrator at lower resolution (therefore bigger size) and try to trace it again. By lower resolution I mean: you need to keep the same number of pixels and resize the size of the image by lowering the resolution in Photoshop. It will be the exact same image but bigger at a lower resolution. There will be more points ...


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You can easily draw the lines using the pen tool. 1) use the pen tool (P) and start drawing some paths. Once you're done with a road you can click on the black mouse (V) to stop/deselect the current path. You can change the colors by selecting the boxes next to the width stroke option. 2) Re-select the path using the black mouse tool (V). Change the ...


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Your monitor uses pixels to display anything. There's no such thing as a digital display where pixels are not present, regardless of how an image is constructed. Some construction method do not output pixel data, but all displays use pixels.


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File - save for web Select your output file (jpg|png|gif) and the quality In the middle you will see a drop down under percent. Select "Type Optimized"


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To avoid jagged lines when you "Save for Web & Devices" in the tab "Image Size" set combo box at the bottom to "Art optimized" or "Type optimized" depending on the content of your image (by default this combo box is set to "None").



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