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0

You want to first clean up the non-vector image. This can be done by indexing it in your favourite raster editing program (PS,GIMP,etc..) in Image>Mode>Indexed or something along the lines of that, then selecting the appropriate amount of colors you want and afterwards cleaning up the image manually. Afterwards the conversion will be much cleaner when ...


6

If you want 1 shape from these two you can Expand them and Unite them via Pathfinder Second, you can just Group them - they will save the relations to each other Third, you can Make Compound Path from these shapes... Fourth, you can use Shape Builder tool to unite them via shift-click-drag


0

It is is currently not possible to modify SVG styles in the browser, however this is set to change soon, once the SVG2 specification is finalized and adopted by vendors. However W3 use a polyfill script on the aforementioned article to emulate the effect


0

Let's say I have lines like this - I created a circle and send it back - Shift+Cmd+[, Next I expand the shapes and perform Minus Front in Pathfinder. This is the result -


0

It means exactly what it says. You've got an object or objects that would fall outside the allowable drawing area if you move them the direction you are trying. Sometimes this can be a simple stray point. Zoom out as far as you can and Select > Select All. Then look for stray objects and remove them if they exist. If none exist, try reducing the size of ...


1

I believe it is a bug that you might be facing. I tried doing what you did and it worked fine. There are however two ways to control radius, one is only on Primary Selection which only gives you overall radius control. And secondary Selection which allows you to control each point individually by selecting the required point.


2

http://design.tutsplus.com/tutorials/quick-tip-data-driven-graphics-using-illustrators-variables-panel--vector-5604 Illustrator variables / data-driven documents: how to batch-export one file for each data set? two links that should help you out


1

In Photoshop CC or Photoshop CC2014, when placing the Illustrator file into Photoshop, choose File > Place Linked. This will link the Smart Object to the Illustrator file. Edits to the Illustrator file from there on will be reflected in the Photoshop Smart Object. Note, this is new Photoshop CC behavior and not possible in previous versions of ...


-1

I'm afraid that Adobe CS or CC is not conceived in such an integrated way. I have never seen myself in the position you describe but what I would try is to link the psd file you are working on in the illustrator file which at the same time is linked in the psd. I would place it in a hidden layer, so when you are in Ps you can see only the vectors an whenever ...


1

I'm guessing you have the green ribbon in a single object. If that's the case you should separate the front of it (the green rectangle in the middle) from everything beyond the fold (if seen going from the middle to the outside). Once you have it in separate objects my fastest option is to select the green rectangle, Cut it (Ctrl/Cmd + X) and Paste In Front ...


2

I have CS5 for Mac and it is Command+] to bring forward (Command+[ to send backwards). You can find the menu item under Object > Arrange. Alternatively, give each element a meaningful name in the Layers palette, select the layer and drag it to the desired position.


1

Choose object Hit alt shift cmd + R (At least on a mac). And ctrl + ] or [ on Windows Depending on your system, use these steps however many times you need to reach your desired effect.


1

Select your rectangle with the direct selection tool (), so you can see the vector nodes. Then zoom in CMD+= until you can see the pixel grid. Now you can count the number of pixel rows between the two nodes, this is the value you need to use for your new rounded rectangle radius. In this example the radius is 10px.


0

Make sure that every path gets a thin stroke in the same color as the fill. I wouldn't know how to do this automatically in Inkscape or AI, but depending on your how geek you are, you can do search and replace in a text editor on the SVG file. SVG files are human readable ASCII files (well, kinda readable). You'd need to use a text-editor that can do ...


5

Most art will remain vector. Some things like multiple nested clipping paths are painful to do. See example 1 for just one thing that would be hard to do in Photoshop, not to mention how would you edit this in PS? Example 1: This is trivial to do and edit in illustrator but not so easy in PS. The biggest problem is that you need to come up with a ...


1

The only fool-proof thing I have found is to use Art Optimized and export as TIFF. In a test that I did recently, only the TIF export format removed the lines.


2

In the Layers Panel Menu ... Release to Layers (Sequence) and Release to Layers (Build) The difference between the two is the stacking order of the created layers. Sequence creates layers from the bottom up, build does the opposite. (Or vice versa... but that's the basics.)


2

What you need to do is this: Expand the small path, so that its bounds extend over the outline of the oval (you'll need to click 'Close Path' in the inspector to make it a close path): Duplicate the big oval: Select the newly duplicate oval and the small shape: Select Layer › Combine › Intersect: Select Layer › Paths › Flatten: Ta-da!: Hope ...


0

You have to save the colors in the colors swatches window. Select one of your rectagle and then, in the swatches window, click the "New Swatch" and add your color. Then you can drag your color to your gradient window


0

This is an older tutorial but a good introduction to using gradients and swatches in Illustrator, it really helped me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPQxbIvSNJI


2

Click on one stop of the gradient or create a new one, press I to invoke eyedropper, hold shift and select a color of any object - it will be added to the stop.


0

An alternate technique is to just draw, then export to a decently high-resolution file which is a multiple of the desired pixel resolution (288 or 576 ppi), then reduce the pixel file to the proper resolution in PhotoShop using Bicubic Sharper (Best for Reduction).


2

Whatever gets the job done Photoshop is absolutely fine for some tasks. In fact, it may even be better at times. It all depends upon the final desired output. (example: Illustrator can't dither gradients... Photoshop will.) A well-rounded designer will use many tools to complete a project. It is rare to rely on only one piece of software for all projects. ...


1

PNG's format aren't vector, like jpg, gif and many others. Their are raster image. If you want to export a vector image, you have to do "File > Save As.." and then select the file format like .svg, .eps, ai (Illustrator) and .pdf. These images are visible only through any software or in the browser. If you do "File > Export..." you can only save a raster ...


4

It's the .png format that is the problem. .png is a raster format that will not upsize very well, just like any raster format. You need to save it in a vector format, such as: .ai - You'll most likely want to save everything to this format for your own safe keeping because it retains all editability unlike other formats. You would then save the same file ...


1

Actually Photoshop is design software.. It "also" has options for editing a photo. Primarily designing is done with Photoshop. It cannot be sidelined as a photo editor. Photoshop is certainly not similar to picassa editors. The wide range of features enables people to experiment with every kind of effects. There are many ways with which one can create ...


1

Yes, using Photoshop for designing software is industry standard practice. Im totally with you, i prefer making designs in Indesign or Illustrator vector based, but Photoshop supports vectors too (Smart Objects) and many people use it.


0

I think you have to design these icons using a pixel-snap grid. You have to set the grid (and units) and the document settings. Try to follow this -old- article: http://petshopboxstudio.com/blog/articles/how-to-prepare-illustrator-for-pixel-perfection/


2

Object > Expand Appearance then merge with Pathfinder. Alternatively: Object > Path > Outline Stroke


0

My solution was to save as a PDF, open it in photoshop and save it as the raster image. I believe it was poor anti-aliasing as @Scott suggested, which Photoshop handles much better. Art optimized did not improve the issue. It's not an idea solution by any means, but it does work.


0

It's due transparency blend space (image can be printed on transparent film with white background, where white is also a color and it's not pure white). There one more option in addition Apex mentioned: File > Document Setup > Transparency and Overprint Options > Simulate Colored Paper


2

It depends on how you originally created the artwork. If it was created as vector artwork then you can export it as vector artwork (see Gramps' references) but if it was created as raster artwork you will have to somehow create the vector artwork information. Without going too much into it, raster artwork is a pixel-by-pixel description of artwork. This is ...


0

You could try using the Pathfinder and performing a Divide first. This will make sure that overlapping areas are simplified. In particular it will make sure that the counter of the "a" (the enclosed part) is knocked out from the black area, which I seem to understand is what is giving you trouble. Then, after divided, you could select all black objects ...


1

First draw a velocity profile. After that, pick the Selector tool (the first one) and single-click the shape representing the velocity profile. The handles around the bounding box will change from scaling handles to rotation and shear handles. Use the handles in the middle of the edges to shear (aka skew, tilt) the shape. To duplicate shapes, use Ctrl+D. If ...


0

An interesting conundrum. In this situation, I might try Pathfinder on one instance of the logo, get that right, then create the pattern and merge, but you're well past that point. At this stage, I don't see messing with paths as productive. You want to end up with a half-tone of a particular size or a small range of sizes, so there isn't really a need to ...


0

Why don't you group images then make a clipping mask and a gradient over that? This way you can change anything you need to at a later date as well easily



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