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It's hard to see exactly how your shapes are set up from the image, it looks like the bottom part is constructed differently from the main letter. Regardless, Pathfinder is the correct way to go. What you need to do first is outline your strokes. Pathfinder doesn't play well (or at all) with strokes. Just do (Object > Expand) on your shapes first.


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It wouldn't really add anything. That is what pixel images are anyway, a map of discrete colored squares, exactly the same as if you converted each pixel to a vector square. Take this image from my answer on a previous question asking how to do exactly what you are talking about: That is a 256 pixel square tile increased in size to 6,400 pixels square, ...


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As you put it, vectorizing every pixel makes no sense. Imagine you vectorize every pixel and then resize it. You simply have bigger squares. The exact same thing happens if you change the ppi on an output, you have bigger pixels. You do not need to resample it. You want to get rid of the blurriness. That is a totally different issue. That happens when ...


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I use symbols for what you are doing: cmd + shift + f11. Select the object and in the menu in your symbols pallet click new and save. Then when you need that shape pull it out onto the screen. Make sure to unlink if you are using multiple versions because if you make a change to one object you make it to all.


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This is because Illustrator now creates Linked Assets. In previous versions of Illustrator CC, every graphic asset, once dragged from the Libraries panel into an Illustrator document, was no longer linked in any way to the original asset. Consequently, modifying the original asset in a library had no effect on the copy used in the document. Illustrator ...


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Okay, here is how how I get Adobe library, it's a way to use elements across Adobe applications. Having said that, Adobe library saves it in a way that all Adobe applications can handle. That doesn't mean you can't work on it or edit it, in my version of Illustrator it shows where it was created, and if you double click on the Ai icon next to it, it opens a ...


2

You're having an issue, because the source file is tiny. To illustrate this, I increased the object's size by 500% (Object > Transform > Scale): At 500% scale, you can finally begin to notice the offset path (-1 px here): I would increase your object's size, to begin with. Alternatively, you can try to mess around with small decimals to offset your ...


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The subtraction of the inner circle can be reset, giving this result: (Btw, this only works after removing the circle from the group, or else Sketch just subtracts two circles from the rectangle at a different spot) As you can see, it kinda works, but there is a whole part of the inside of the circle again that is flowing outside of the boundaries of the ...


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This doesn't directly answer your question about converting the pixels to vector shapes, but... If the only reason you want to convert the pixels to vector shapes is to scale then it's not really necessary (it would be nice, but if your having trouble doing it, it's not essential). All you need to do is increase the size of the image in integer multiples ...


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Pasting paths will usually rasterise you graphic - which does not scale well. If you want a smooth scaleable graphic (but one you still can't edit in Keynote) you can import PDFs. Those will scale smoothly, and Keynote is pretty good at preserving things like transparency. You will need to design and edit the graphics in another program. (Also most design ...


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Filling a path can make slight "jaggynes". For the pixelation goes, it all depends on the resolution of your document, remeber that photoshop documents isnt vectorbased in the same fashion that Illustrator, and that you cant get the same scaling. When choosing the path tool, make sure to chose the shape tool in the drop down menu.


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I realize this question was posted a while ago, but it resonated with me and I wanted to respond with some insight. I am also a self-taught graphic designer, and I remember how confusing all of this was for me. It was difficult for me to decide which skills I should be honing, and which ones should fall to the wayside. Several years of professional ...


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Draw hexagon using polygon tool (Shift+drag) Draw lines from one point to another as below Select all and Divide with Pathfinder to create individual triangles then ungroup them. Fill all triangles with random colors and remove outline, then group them. Go to Menu -> Object->Pattern->Make Select Tile Type to Hex by Column then done. A pattern ...


0

I would probably not even bother closing the lines, just make a layer behind the lines then use the brush or blob brush to block in areas of solid colour. You can then use Warp / Smooth to get them under control rather than messing with individual points. Closing paths is a pain, so avoid it if you can.


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This happens because your path is being imported from Photoshop as a Compound Shape. Strokes, or any appearance attributes, are applied to the whole shape. To stop this from happening you need to release the compound shape from the Pathfinder panel's options dropdown: You can find out more about Compound Shapes here: Adobe Illustrator Help - Compound ...


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Ideally if the sketch can be done at 100% RGB of the device screen (roughly) Take note when you shrink and image the lines become more finer and detail gets dropped off. What the sketch is drawn on does not matter so much depending upon the line quality needed. If the paper is fine then the drawing will have sharper lines as compared to a textured paper ...


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Well, you do not need that much high resolution. A. The scale, depending on what you want. If you need presicion on the proportions, it is better to draw at a larger scale. If you want a lot of detail, larger scale. If you want the texture of the technique (paper, stroke) you can draw at smaller scale. A natural look, draw at the final scale. If it is a ...


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You can only join the end points of open paths so joining in this case won't work. If your strokes are the same weight, snap the end point of the open path to the other path (turn on smart guides to help), and set the end cap of the stroke to a rounded cap. If your strokes are different weights there isn't much you can do (automatically anyway). You have ...


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There's a great plugin from Astute Graphics called VectorScribe in which you can retract the handles to any specific number, including zero.


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1. Select the Convert Anchor Point Tool (SHIFT + C) 2. Click on the end of the handle you want to remove. If you want to remove both handles (i.e. convert to a corner point) just click the anchor point itself. You can also convert the anchor point to a corner point by alt + clicking on the anchor point with the Pen Tool selected or using the Convert ...


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I'm no expert in Illustrator, but in my initial self-teaching with it, I was doing this exact project, but with sports logos (to create that deep neon sign effect). I was able to easily do this with Gaussian Blur and Outer Glow effect in Illustrator CC 2015 by performing an image trace>expand, applying a clear fill and thin stroke to all remaining traced ...



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