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4

There are many ways, but I might use Clipping mask to mask out everything that is outside the circles. I made one arrow and duplicated it. I also Linked the arrows, so that they can be moved freely, as shown in the gif below. Yellow arrow is in a clipping mask with Circle - RED and Red arrow is in clipping mask with Circle - BLACK.


1

Illustrator does not really excel at this sort of operation. This is why I linked to Excentro in the comment above. Excentro is specifically designed to create guillochés and it's artwork is exportable (as vector) to Illustrator. Of course, I realize Excentro is an extra cost. The ways I can think to try and pull it off with only Illustrator include: ...


2

Open the EPS file with Adobe Illustrator. Grab the Direct Selection Tool (the white arrow) Click and drag around everything you do not want. Hit the Delete key twice. Choose File > Save As... from the menu to save what you have left. (Do not use the PNG or JPG file if you want vector data, you must use the EPS file.) You may want to review the ...


1

PNG is not a vector format--although some programs will put hidden vectors in as extra data. Adobe Fireworks, for instance. But only that program will display it. In general, the standard of PNG is really just a bitmap. Usually higher quality than a JPG because it doesn't throw out details for compression. But just because something is a PNG doesn't make ...


4

Try and use the Eraser tool, Shift+E. You can click anywhere to erase that part of a path. Double click the tool or use [ and ] to change the brush size. Be warned that the eraser will erase any and all paths, unless you make a selection. If something is selected, the eraser will only erase from the selection and leave all other paths intact.


1

I'd like to refer to the attractivity part of your question with this gif:


0

Starting fresh..... The basic steps are as follows: Select all your shapes (or text) Choose Object > Expand Appearance from the menu, if it is available Choose Object > Expand from the menu Choose Object > Compound Path > Make from the menu Select the objects and the background Choose Object > Clipping Path > Make from the menu Step 2 ...


0

The Clipping Mask works by using the front-most path as a frame through which to see the background object(s). If you want the mask to be everything that is showing as black in your [3] image, you'll need to combine them in to a single object first. To do this, I would recommend following @Cakey's advice for outlining strokes to get solid shapes, and then ...


2

There is a function called "Outline Stroke" in the Path menu under Object. So if you make a big fat stroke on a horizontal line, for instance, and run that, you will get a shape that is a solid rectangle that looks like the stroked line...but it is a filled shape. Maybe that could get you what you want but it seems awkward. I don't know the effect you are ...


1

The short answer is yes you can. As long as the aspect ratio is the same. It would be best also if you converted your strokes to paths, just to make sure they scale proportionately as well. The same does apply to raster-based stuff. Lots of tradeshow art gets scaled down to send over to printers.


4

I usually try to work in 1:1 scale, but rarely do I work with formats that large. It's not uncommon for artwork to be set at a smaller scale, though. Here's a question that touches on that: In Illustrator, how do I set my file at 10% scale? When going back and forth with a customer, I find it easier to communicate with exact sizes. I try and avoid language ...


4

I don't see why not. Just be careful that the sizes are proper when you export the file for print (something I'd use InDesign for, anyway). If all else fails, you could always just scale the finished work to the desired size.


0

You can't edit the clipping path directly. Ordinariy, you will have to unset the clipping path (select clipped object, object->clip->unset), modify the path, and set the clipping again. As that may be unsuitable for most cases, one possible work around is to create a clone of the clipping path (edit->clone->create clone), and set the clonned ...


1

Instead of just making a single green one your pattern tile, make a pattern tile with one of each color as shown below in the red box: Note that the top part of the blue one is actually at the bottom of the pattern tile.


2

You want to choose PNG-24 in the second drop-down: Your dot should look like the example on the right here: I'm not an authority on the png (Portable Network Graphic) file format, but I'll explain what I do know about it. An 8-bit png is limited to 256 colors, whereas 24-bit can have as many as 16-million colors. My observation is that transparency ...


4

I ran into this exact same issue a while ago, also while drawing a bunch of small icons. Turns out you can do some pretty neat stuff with the "Blend if… This Layer" slider in the Layer Style panel: Dragging the right slider all the way to the left basically tells Photoshop, "keep everything I draw black opaque, and make everything white transparent". ...


6

Being Photoshop, there’s probably quite a few approaches to this problem, but only one I can think of that maintains full vector edited and scaling. There’s a few things going on here. Square is just a shape layer for the square. Nothing tricky there. The Blurry Circle group has a circle as a vector mask. The vector mask is set to subtract and also has ...


0

Your pattern needs to already have the color variations in it. You can use the pattern tool with several objects (in this case, the elements in different colors). This tutorial shows you how to do a pattern with one or several repeating elements: ...


0

First, I will answer the question about the envelope, as I think this is what you really want to know. Your logic is a little bit off here. If you want to retain transparency, ie. not use white lines for the envelope, you should instead create a rectangle, then on the same layer change the shape tool to 'line', then change the Path Operations to Subtract, ...


0

If you absolutely MUST only use a single layer, AND your shapes are spaced out, you could use a gradient fill on the shape layer. With a bit of tinkering you should be able to achieve 1 layer and multiple colours. However Photoshop is not designed to work this way. If you don't know how to separate shapes into new layers it's easy: just select your shape ...


1

If by "shapes" you mean vector layers or shape layers, then no. It is not possible to have multiple colors on a single vector or shape layer. Any method to change colors will require at least one additional layer per color needed. That can be a separate layer for each shape, or a separate layer filled with color and masked - but it always takes additional ...


0

You want to first clean up the non-vector image. This can be done by indexing it in your favourite raster editing program (PS,GIMP,etc..) in Image>Mode>Indexed or something along the lines of that, then selecting the appropriate amount of colors you want and afterwards cleaning up the image manually. Afterwards the conversion will be much cleaner when ...


6

If you want 1 shape from these two you can Expand them and Unite them via Pathfinder Second, you can just Group them - they will save the relations to each other Third, you can Make Compound Path from these shapes... Fourth, you can use Shape Builder tool to unite them via shift-click-drag



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