New answers tagged

1

You need to change the colorization method to 'Exact': You can change the colorization method for all colors in the Color Reduction Options dialog by clicking the button next to the presets. Also make sure you have 'Recolor Artwork' checked.


8

There are many ways of approaching this. Your right a curve does not have to be made out of one piece, it can be built out of several pieces. In fact one curve can be built out of several curves. I have answered a similar question, about spiral caps, mostly the same applies here. When you do is you make a initial shape and then rotate and mirror it about. ...


0

Your probably better off using illustrator to get a vector image out of a non vector. Illustrator has a nice auto trace feature. While not 100% perfect it can get the job done in some images with the right set of information in the image. Just open the image in Illustrator and click the auto trace button in the toolbar. If that doesn't work with the ...


4

tldr No, because of standards. Not out of the box Adobe and PostScript simply use cubic Béziers. A cubic Bézier has 4 points. The decision is arbitrary and was done ages ago. The underlying vector specifications PostScript, PDF and SVG only natively support 2 (square) and 3 (cubic) order Béziers. So any export to these engines would need to change your ...


2

The shape is cut into 2 and the lower part is given a gradient to darker color. Here is a example showing the final result and then the shape outlines: One can further subside to pieces to get more control over the effect. Also you can use lighter parts in the gradient to make it more visible. Bevel is a good name for this.


7

In Illustrator, you when you rotate an object using the rotate tool, you can first click once to set the pivot pint and that's what your object will rotate around. arrange your cards in a row so that they are not quite on top of each other, and then pivot them all at the same pivot point. To ensure they are all rotated at the same pivot point, rotate the ...


0

This will be a very short answer. Look for "Cartoon Photoshop" https://www.google.com/search?q=cartoon+photoshop There are a lot of tutorials and processes. The basics probably are some kind of posterize (color reduction), edge detection, saturation.


2

Have you thought about SketchUp? I have found it easy to learn and use, and it is backed by a pretty big 3D model repository. You can export 2D graphics from it too. Sketchup: http://www.sketchup.com/ (you can download the free Sketchup Make and try it out) Sketchup repository: https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/index.html


3

Illustrator uses a font engine that is not capable of doing single line fonts. All fonts in illustrator are outlines no matter what. If we take CNC Vector as an example its simply a outline that turns up on itself, so it is not truly a singe line font as far as illustrator or your cad is concerned. So beware if you use a cnc machine/ laser cutter the area ...


3

SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is an XML based vector image format. You can use your coordinates and path descriptions to write your SVG code directly in any text editor. You describe your image using SVG path elements, using various drawing commands as well as basic shape elements in combination with fills and strokes etc. You can find more info on SVG ...


0

Select your path, then in layer panel in lower right corner select create new fill/ adjustment layer and select solid color.


3

You can take a good photo of the logo, or have it scanned. Then use Inkscape to trace it acordingly to the instructions with the photo as a base. Edited. You can not trace a logo using formulas, but yes, if a logo has parameters you can use them, for example, the line A is one thirth of the line B. The total width is 20 times larger than the stroke C. ...


1

Layer > Convert to Outlines Boolean operations work on paths, not strokes (or effects etc). You need to convert your stroke to outlines so that you are working exclusively with paths.


1

If I understand the problem, there are several ways to do this: Enable the "Snap to page border" snapping option, then just drag the object towards the corner With the object selected, you can manually set the X and Y coordinates from the toolbar With the object selected, press Ctrl+Shift+X to open the XML editor and change the X and Y manually


2

When you import a vector file into inkscape, it comes in as a group of vector objects. Thus resolution isn't an issue. I do this a lot for graphs from origin and python/matplotlib. This is easy to check - -click on a curve in your graph and select the "edit paths by node" tool (F2) - you'll be able to edit the nodes. Auto-updating would be nice, but I ...


2

Take my (similarly well made...) map of Westeros Draw your Kingdom's borders With everything selected, use the Shape Builder Tool (SHIFT + M) Select each Kingdom and color as you wish Westeros!


1

Alternatively you can use the Pathfinder's Divide tool. Open the Pathfinder panel with Shift+Ctr+F9. Draw the provinces as paths dividing Westeros, and make sure those lines overlap. Select everything and click on divide. You can then cleanup and style the different Kingdoms separately. NB: Protip, to get the best cleanup effect make sure you don't ...


0

Came here looking for an answer, but stumbled upon the solution myself while working through the one suggested here. Select your shapes/paths and "Join" them: Layer > Paths > Join.


1

Open your artwork in Illustrator, select the elements that are 'disappearing' and, in the Attributes panel, make sure Overprint Fill and/or Overprint Stroke aren't checked. You can also quickly check if you're going to have any overprint issues by going View > Overprint Preview.


-3

I've encountered the same problem before. A white filled logo disappered and the file format I used for printing was PDF. First, try check the color fill for that vector and see if it's a plain color (usually happen to white color) and it's ticked as overprint, untick the overprint fill. Then try resave and print the file again. Second method, copy the ...


3

There is no info on how the curve should continue. Adobe gives you three (or four more on that later) choices in these cases. The choices are miter, which continues the path straight after information stops, round, which makes a circular join, and bevel which just connects the parts at the unknown. Image 1: The three choices provided by Adobe when ...


2

First make sure the top image is the only layer, so if there's a default white background layer then delete it. Layer → Layer Style → Blending Options Under This Layer at the bottom see how the left part of the white is moved in. Hold Alt and drag that part of the slider with your mouse until its to your liking.


0

The CC0 licence clearly states that any waiver is permanent and irrevocable. Excerpt from CC0 1.0 Universal (emphasis added on relevant text): To the greatest extent permitted by, but not in contravention of, applicable law, Affirmer hereby overtly, fully, permanently, irrevocably and unconditionally waives, abandons, and surrenders all of Affirmer's ...


0

It sounds like what you need to do is change the size of the artboard in Illustrator. This will mean that, when you place the file in InDesign, anything that falls outside the artboard is 'cropped'. In Illustrator, draw a box around your image where you want it to be cropped Go Object > Artboards > Convert to Artboards Hit Save Now place this ...


0

Like Cai said, outline your strokes first either the way he suggested or (Object > Path > Outline Stroke). For the solid black pieces, zoom in extremely close and make sure the anchor points are either perfectly aligned or, preferably, overlapping. With Pathfinder, groups can cause a lot of headache. Ungroup (Object > Ungroup) any shapes that might be ...


0

Path remains path. There is no difference between them. Illustrator can be open the .psd files and works with Photoshop shapes, but the reverse is not true. Photoshop doesn't open (in editable vector) the ai, eps, pdf or any Illustrator file format. But using the "copy-paste" commands, it works both ways.


2

Short and generalized answer—The paths are the same, the output is different. There are great explanations of the difference between vector and raster images here: What are the differences between vector graphics and raster graphics? Slightly longer answer—It depends... Adobe Illustrator is a vector graphics program. Everything you create in ...


0

It's hard to see exactly how your shapes are set up from the image, it looks like the bottom part is constructed differently from the main letter. Regardless, Pathfinder is the correct way to go. What you need to do first is outline your strokes. Pathfinder doesn't play well (or at all) with strokes. Just do (Object > Expand) on your shapes first.


4

It wouldn't really add anything. That is what pixel images are anyway, a map of discrete colored squares, exactly the same as if you converted each pixel to a vector square. Take this image from my answer on a previous question asking how to do exactly what you are talking about: That is a 256 pixel square tile increased in size to 6,400 pixels square, ...


6

As you put it, vectorizing every pixel makes no sense. Imagine you vectorize every pixel and then resize it. You simply have bigger squares. The exact same thing happens if you change the ppi on an output, you have bigger pixels. You do not need to resample it. You want to get rid of the blurriness. That is a totally different issue. That happens when ...


1

I use symbols for what you are doing: cmd + shift + f11. Select the object and in the menu in your symbols pallet click new and save. Then when you need that shape pull it out onto the screen. Make sure to unlink if you are using multiple versions because if you make a change to one object you make it to all.


3

This is because Illustrator now creates Linked Assets. In previous versions of Illustrator CC, every graphic asset, once dragged from the Libraries panel into an Illustrator document, was no longer linked in any way to the original asset. Consequently, modifying the original asset in a library had no effect on the copy used in the document. Illustrator ...


1

Okay, here is how how I get Adobe library, it's a way to use elements across Adobe applications. Having said that, Adobe library saves it in a way that all Adobe applications can handle. That doesn't mean you can't work on it or edit it, in my version of Illustrator it shows where it was created, and if you double click on the Ai icon next to it, it opens a ...


2

You're having an issue, because the source file is tiny. To illustrate this, I increased the object's size by 500% (Object > Transform > Scale): At 500% scale, you can finally begin to notice the offset path (-1 px here): I would increase your object's size, to begin with. Alternatively, you can try to mess around with small decimals to offset your ...


1

The subtraction of the inner circle can be reset, giving this result: (Btw, this only works after removing the circle from the group, or else Sketch just subtracts two circles from the rectangle at a different spot) As you can see, it kinda works, but there is a whole part of the inside of the circle again that is flowing outside of the boundaries of the ...


2

This doesn't directly answer your question about converting the pixels to vector shapes, but... If the only reason you want to convert the pixels to vector shapes is to scale then it's not really necessary (it would be nice, but if your having trouble doing it, it's not essential). All you need to do is increase the size of the image in integer multiples ...



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