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15

I think you don't have many more options that make sense. It's logical to use the 2 colors in the box and the question mark makes the message clear too. But maybe you could play with the angle of your colors, and the font style too. On the first one, I simply changed the angle and it seems to interfere less with the question mark. It really changes the ...


13

Consider adjusting the colors so that a black or a white question mark will be visible on both of them, but keeping them the same at the borders. For example: You can still see the original colors on the borders, but the black question mark is now visible on the lightened interior (I just used the Brightness/Contrast tool in GIMP). (In hindsight, the ...


10

In design, this is often viewed as unnecessary ornamentation. Is it necessary? No? Then it's unnecessary. Additional elements should only be added with a purpose. To draw the viewers attention, to make them feel a certain way, to create a composition that makes the information more easily readable, etc. and should never be an end in itself.


9

If you, the creator, is unsure, how will the reader know which it is? Short answer: the value should be linked 1:1 to the amount of colour on the page. So in your example, it should be area. But there's more than that: you also need to avoid misleading cues that might make a reader read it incorrectly, and you need to know why you're using area instead of ...


9

Agree with go-me's answer. Another approach could be a 'playing card' approach, and invert the questionmark both in colour and position, like thus:


8

So is the question essentially how to visualise sound? If so the process is essentially: Decide what you want to achieve (something abstract like these music-based sculptures? Something with practical useful value? Something with a dual purpose?) Decide which sound variables (frequency, magnitude, etc) are most useful to that goal - will involve some ...


7

First off: I can only speak for print and general cases, for I have zilch experience with video. Bear with me. I don't think there's hard and fast rules to determine the 'right' amount of fluff. Left-brainers will hate me, but I guess it's one of those things that just has to 'feel' right without being quantifiable. Moreover, there's other factors at work, ...


6

How to make something stand out? Contrast. Easiest way is to use dark vs. bright or opposing colors like red and green. The issue you are having is that your caracter also blends with the tiles, while the background is rich in color. Which makes us look at the background first. Basically, look at any similar game, you will see that background and foreground ...


6

What you want is Taxedo ...which would give you the ability to create tag-clouds and word clouds that looks like this:


6

You're asking a very broad question but I will try to help you in the best way possible. Creating a logo for a business card? Design business card with client information Buy card stock typically 100lb. Run said card stock through printer Set reg. marks and print the business card (print more than one in case there is a print issue or you mess up ...


5

Adobe Illustrator actually has some very under-utilized capabilities to enhance chart representations of data. There's a good tutorial by Mordy Golding here, and his Lynda.com tutorials also go into this in excellent detail. For the kind of work I do, I'll use Illustrator in this way, or build things by hand. For inspiration, and to give you an idea of how ...


5

I'd say the area. Optically, a square with a side two times as long shows as an area 4 times as big. Casual observers will relate to the area, even without reading your legend. A nice example is this legendary graph by xkcd's Randall Munroe: (huge, legible version)


5

I'm no way a professional, but when i'm dealing with an issue of this type (white isn't visible on the light color, black isn't visible on the dark color), i always do the same thing: i put the text in white, with a black border. You are sure the text will be visible on all colors. You could take you picture number 3, adding a black border to the question ...


5

The logic symbol for "xor" is commonly.... You could use this symbol ..... Ultimately this is all a matter of opinion and preference though. Whatever works for you, works :) If it's all about clarity.. don't overthink it.... Or maybe.... There are really dozens of ways (if not hundreds) to visually represent this. I think this is just too broad ...


4

Weighted graphics on the ends of a line; the thicker/longer an arrowhead or oval is at the end of a line for the more people going in that direction. Colored ends at a line, say red and blue to make a purple with a given color representing a direction, and the mix showing which direction people went. Full red or blue being all one direction and purple being ...


4

What problem are you trying to solve? The approach and therefore best tools depend on... Are you visualising data to (a) analyse it, explore it or open it up, or to (b) communicate a specific, known message about it? Who is your audience? In particular, are they (a) casual people who's interest you want to attract (e.g. readers of a magazine, people ...


4

Try R -- it is a full array programming language for doing data science, with a powerful plotting capabilities. It easily exports to PDF and SVG (among other formats) and those files import nice and are made in way they can be reasonably edited. Also there are usually numerous options to control the plot. And there is a package called ade4 which does ...


4

If you work with a big amount of data I recommend you try gephi. It gives you nice control on what and how should be visualized.


4

In my opinion the area (D), not each side (E). If you are using a side of length 2, then the area would be 4 times the value and you would have a very overlapped graph. (E) When you have a normal bar graph (A), the data is linear, and the with of the bar is just for esthetic. (B) In those cases the area again is representative of the data because the ...


4

I'm going to approach this from a purely graphic point of view. Looking at what a database basically is... it's a container which holds various unmatched items. To this end, I would approach it as such. How litteral or abstract you get would depend upon the desired impression on the reader. You could be very basic and abstract: A bucket full of ...


4

I'd like to add a Historical answer to this question. In the early days fluff was a solution for a problem. For example in architecture the plastering was invented in order to hide cracks in walls. This became an artform itself and when the technique was good enough and plastering was no longer necessary, plastering became fluff. Therefore fluff is the ...


4

We're not as good at judging differences in area as we are in length. We use length as a proxy and therefore tend to underestimate differences in areas. For this reason, a circle that actually has 2x the area of another appears too small because our brain is relating their radii, which differ by a factor of 1.4x. There's are interesting attempts at ...


4

I was just thinking you could go with the opposite angle so as to prevent the "clash" between the diagonal line and question mark ending (top end). + also I've tried with non-zero thickness of the delimiting line. I'm an amateur.


4

Where the context clearly prevents the icon being interpreted as "orange and blue" it must represent "orange or blue". As such, there is no need for the question mark at all in your case. Leaving out the question mark allows a possibility of more than two colours to be more easily shown — a question-mark may not make it easy to see the potential colours. ...


3

Practice with whatever vector app you settle on using (doesn't matter which). Challenge yourself to create shapes with as few anchor points/nodes as possible. Learn to think symmetrically when creating vector shapes. A circle needs 4 anchors, you shouldn't need more than 4 to create a circle. Learn all drawing operational shortcuts for your vector app - ...


3

Looks like a case of too much contrast. In photoshop/gimp/whatever, try looking at a portion of the green things, and a sample of the cracked sky, the character etc. Look at the histograms of these. They each span a broad range of values, black or near black to white or near white. Objects and background are easier for the eye to separate when their ...


3

I mainly use R to visualize data. It has a myriad of packages that extend its use. For instance, see R Graphics Gallery.


3

I see a lot about professional and commercial software here, so this one might be a bit off-side: I use LaTeX and TikZ (which is a LaTeX package) for visualization. If I am able to draw and structure my data on a piece of paper, I can also do the same thing with TikZ. The approach is 100% text based, not at all intuitive to beginners, but very powerful. ...


3

Short answer: Use cultural conventions and associations. There are millions, humans soak up conventions. The shape of arrows are a convention, as are warning signs, 'save disks', etc. Spot and use them. Consider affordances: if something looks like X can be done with it, looking at it brings to mind X. Make sure the symbolism goes the right way. It's ...


3

What you are asking for can be accomplished by many 3D rendering programs (Cinema 4D, Maya, etc). The free one among them is called Blender. Unfortunately, there is a learning curve to using this program and you will probably invest significantly more time than a 2D Network map, but it might be what you are looking for. I agree though, this form is a lot ...



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