Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

So is the question essentially how to visualise sound? If so the process is essentially: Decide what you want to achieve (something abstract like these music-based sculptures? Something with practical useful value? Something with a dual purpose?) Decide which sound variables (frequency, magnitude, etc) are most useful to that goal - will involve some ...


6

How to make something stand out? Contrast. Easiest way is to use dark vs. bright or opposing colors like red and green. The issue you are having is that your caracter also blends with the tiles, while the background is rich in color. Which makes us look at the background first. Basically, look at any similar game, you will see that background and foreground ...


5

Adobe Illustrator actually has some very under-utilized capabilities to enhance chart representations of data. There's a good tutorial by Mordy Golding here, and his Lynda.com tutorials also go into this in excellent detail. For the kind of work I do, I'll use Illustrator in this way, or build things by hand. For inspiration, and to give you an idea of how ...


4

Weighted graphics on the ends of a line; the thicker/longer an arrowhead or oval is at the end of a line for the more people going in that direction. Colored ends at a line, say red and blue to make a purple with a given color representing a direction, and the mix showing which direction people went. Full red or blue being all one direction and purple being ...


4

There are two JavaScript libraries that you might find helpful for pulling something like this off: Raphael.js Processing.js Otherwise, there are many, many charting libraries that you could adapt, some Flash, some PHP, some jQuery. Digg used to do some really cool visualizations in Digg labs, but unfortunately, all that remains now after their redesign ...


4

What problem are you trying to solve? The approach and therefore best tools depend on... Are you visualising data to (a) analyse it, explore it or open it up, or to (b) communicate a specific, known message about it? Who is your audience? In particular, are they (a) casual people who's interest you want to attract (e.g. readers of a magazine, people ...


4

I'm going to approach this from a purely graphic point of view. Looking at what a database basically is... it's a container which holds various unmatched items. To this end, I would approach it as such. How litteral or abstract you get would depend upon the desired impression on the reader. You could be very basic and abstract: A bucket full of ...


3

What you are asking for can be accomplished by many 3D rendering programs (Cinema 4D, Maya, etc). The free one among them is called Blender. Unfortunately, there is a learning curve to using this program and you will probably invest significantly more time than a 2D Network map, but it might be what you are looking for. I agree though, this form is a lot ...


3

Practice with whatever vector app you settle on using (doesn't matter which). Challenge yourself to create shapes with as few anchor points/nodes as possible. Learn to think symmetrically when creating vector shapes. A circle needs 4 anchors, you shouldn't need more than 4 to create a circle. Learn all drawing operational shortcuts for your vector app - ...


3

Looks like a case of too much contrast. In photoshop/gimp/whatever, try looking at a portion of the green things, and a sample of the cracked sky, the character etc. Look at the histograms of these. They each span a broad range of values, black or near black to white or near white. Objects and background are easier for the eye to separate when their ...


3

Try R -- it is a full array programming language for doing data science, with a powerful plotting capabilities. It easily exports to PDF and SVG (among other formats) and those files import nice and are made in way they can be reasonably edited. Also there are usually numerous options to control the plot. And there is a package called ade4 which does ...


3

I see a lot about professional and commercial software here, so this one might be a bit off-side: I use LaTeX and TikZ (which is a LaTeX package) for visualization. If I am able to draw and structure my data on a piece of paper, I can also do the same thing with TikZ. The approach is 100% text based, not at all intuitive to beginners, but very powerful. ...


3

So those kind of network graphs are often called node link diagrams. This article might be a good place to start: The Links That Bind Us: Network Visualizations. Except for very small datasets, I'd use a code library or tool that generates networks like this. D3 is a javascript library designed for creating complex visualisations like these. "Force ...


2

As you have locations, the result may be an interactive map. Open-source interactive map software are not very numerous, but you can generate static images and then assemble them in an animation. A great combination of software is R + python + FOSS GIS (free and open source, like GRASS or QGIS). Some introductory educational content are listed here : ...


2

I think that maybe you should add a little contrast. To me it seems you have too many analogous colors http://www.tigercolor.com/color-lab/color-theory/color-theory-intro.htm If you want it to have more of a childish feel I think you should go for primary colors.


2

For non-technical people, you MUST avoid over charting. You should identify the unique parent tables and visually show the many child-record concept for each, with at most 3 levels of depth. This will mean a lot more visuals--in bite size chunks--with overlap. In addition, provide basic definitions of the most important terms like "many to 1." Most people ...


2

Look into Visio from Windows. I have used it in the past, its fairly priced but may help and to me its a well rounded diagram program. Per your question I would possibly go with Visio because you can use graphical icons to display what you need. Also when creating diagrams in Visio it will can test your database by relation and keys. Examples of Visio: ...


2

Being a graphic designer turned web developer who dabbles in database management from time to time, I often create visual representations of the dbs I need to manage for my own sanity. I'm very visually oriented, so it helps me out. With that said, from my understanding of your question, I believe you are already on the right track. I would continue ...


2

Learn to draw. Beginning with drawing Learning to draw: start in the pen and paper realm or the digital space? Go to Vectortuts and do all their tutorials. As for the difference between raster and vector read this What's the difference between vector graphics and raster graphics? Bottom line, rasters are pixel-based, vectors are path-based.


2

What you want is Taxedo ...which would give you the ability to create tag-clouds and word clouds that looks like this:


2

I agree that a 3D map is probably going to be an unnecessary distraction from your data. However, it can be useful for interactive use - if you can animate a walkthrough or fly-over it might add to the informative aspects. Graphs like this are easy to code in Mathematica. This code (with some random data): vertexshape[{xc_, yc_, zc_}, name_] := ...


2

To be honest if the map is in 2d i don't really see the point of making it 3d at all costs... I mean if you want to have something in 2d there are plenty of (easier) ways to achieve this, the first that comes to mind is using code to generate the graph if you have the dataset set like that. One good example could be d3.js, a relatively easy to understand ...


1

Vectors are resolution independent graphics - they are shapes that can be resized to any scale. This makes them very flexible for many different mediums and uses. Vectors are basically the sole purpose for a program like Adobe Illustrator. Raster graphics have a fixed resolution meaning they have a maximum scaling value. Anything beyond that and their ...


1

What is imho a really neat concept, in terms of the way they represent things on their main, homepage, is Pinterest. This is not the users picture, but each users most recent photo or picture. They have width restrictions, but the height can be, well, very long. Which makes for a neat, refreshing interface at times. When you have a uniform size of a ...


1

Poser has pre defined facial expressions and would allow for the other things you want to do. It is one of the best character tools around (imho). Also check the site for tutorials as they have some quite comprehensive ones.


1

So your question is essentially "help me brainstorm visual representations of the idea of lots of languages, in a way that is non-offensive and can be used in a banner image"? If so the only possible "right" answer will be about how to go about getting ideas. So first, how do you do background research on what already exists solving similar problems? You ...


1

If you are looking to misrepresent, rather than present, you can just do what the big boys do and start the scale at or slightly below the lower of the two values, with the second value plus some small amount for the max value. Don't label the scale with any values and you are good to go. Another way is to improperly use a logarithmic scale.


1

Mood boards, very roughly, are to design what high-level block diagrams are to programming: a way to pull the basic elements of together so you can have a broad agreement on what the end result will look like. There was a great example of putting together a mood board in the Day 1 keynote at Adobe MAX this year, when Mark Magner from Sesame Workshop ...


1

Judging by the fact the asker's profile says "front-end developer & responsive web designer", I'm guessing this is to be published online - meaning motion can be used. One of the best ways of visualising motion and flow is to use, well, motion and flow (or the illusion of it). This wind map of the USA uses HTML5 canvas particle generation to give the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible