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25

I point out to clients that large logos are the equivalent to SCREAMING at customers. When you walk into a store, do you want the sales rep to come up to you and scream, "HI! WHAT CAN I GET FOR YOU TODAY?!" or would you rather have the rep walk up and quietly ask, "Hi, what can I help you with today?" (It carries more weight when spoken :) ) I ask them to ...


20

Discovery and Scope Sit down with the client to determine, goals, purpose, and needs. I would hope you have drafted a quote of the purposed site. You should also discuss turn-around time and if anything is needed that you cannot provide. You need to figure out how the site will be structured. Such as responsive, tablet and phone only, desktop only, ...


10

Consider exploring their reasons for a larger logo, and trying to fix the underlying problem, or suggesting that the website isn't the best place to fix it. For instance, some simply have an aversion to white space. You'll need to help them understand good layout practices, and that appropriately used whitespace will highlight their logo better than making ...


9

I totally understand the frustration of being in weak in grids and typography, specially if you are a self taught graphic designer. To me this is very open ended question and that there is no right answer to point out for you. In my personal experience, it is how you train your eyes and get feedback from your fellow designers would certainly improve your ...


9

Some clients you have to be brutally honest with and flat out tell them to pick a direction because otherwise he/she is merely wasting your time. You have to often treat these types of clients as children. Allow them to make choices but specifically engineer the choices they have -- "Do you want A or do you want B?" NOT "What do you want?" If ...


6

I would suggest creating an alternative CSS class or ID for the logo and preserve your existing CSS styles under a comment. If the site is responsive and you are using an SVG, I would complete the clients request and show examples of why it will not work. The issue most designers face is that some people cannot see a project visually in their head and they ...


5

This is a very subjective answer. But I'll try. It depends entirely on what the tagline is about. Does it describe the work they do? Like for example- ABC, interactive production studio. See here Does it say a very unique story about the brand in an original way- Like this How are they using their tagline in the rest of their branding material? Do you see ...


5

This is an inherent problem with working for free: when you value your time at $0, your client will too. And it sounds like you haven't structured the relationship so he knows exactly what to expect from you. Although working for free undermines the value of what you do, there will be times you find someone with a good cause and you want to help them out, ...


5

When I have an initial meeting with a client, I give them a list of pre-briefing questions. There are two sets which might be useful here: Pick three (five, etc.) websites you love — they don't have to be from your industry. Why do you love them? What's appealing? The color? The style? The programming? Now, pick three (five, etc.) websites you hate. ...


5

I suggest a bunch of indicators working in tandem: 'Greyed Out' - give the unavailable buttons some transparency, (or the appearance of transparency with lighter colours). This will make sure it is noticeably different from the other buttons, at the very least sparking curiosity as to why it's different. 'Strike-THROUGH!!!!' - "Like seriously guys look, I ...


5

I always try to educate clients on the many goods of white space. It's not just about size, it's about context. If someone wants a huge logo that makes the whole site look clattered, you can prepare some mockups to let them compare what which version really stands out. On the one side, the one with a big logo where the message invades your eye real state. ...


4

A more elegant solution would be to grey out the button, set it's state to disabled and use a disabled cursor to clearly show the state. I've thrown together a quick codepen to demonstrate this.


4

I am also a web designer who has just started in the field. I have done a few projects now, though. For me, my workflow goes like this: Initial Design & Development Meeting This is when I gather all relevant information, including expected completion date, make a list of items needed from my client, etc. PhotoShop Mockups At this time, I find a design ...


4

Visually, it's cute. Nice work on that. Structurally, it's lacking. When you have to explain what to click on to navigate the site, the navigation is broken. Asking a user to read that they need to click on an image of a balloon to actually get to the content of your site (the portfolio) is not intuitive. I'd also rethink calling yourself 'crazy'. :)


4

One thing I noticed is your use of punctuations. You may use them as you like in informal situations, but if we're talking about professional typography, you need to remember these rules: Any punctuation mark only appears one at a time. You have used ??, .. and .... in many places. In your question too, you're missing them in some places. If you want to ...


4

Im on the fence drinking a soda about posting this as an answer but the answer I am going to provide you, I might make into a reference later on when others ask this similar question.. As you stated you're already in the design phase... If you followed a proper workflow (since you haven't mentioned IF you had a mockup, content evaluation, wireframe ...


4

thedigitalmonk! I am a web designer and developer and I think this is something individuals run into quite a bit. It's not always the same answer, so I think some screenshots would be helpful. However, I tend to add a sidebar. Otherwise the page looks off whether the content is centered or not. It looks out-of-balance especially when there are other ...


4

I think the best answer above is the first sentence of Adam's but then he drifts into the same pitfall the other answers have. You need to identify what the value of the logo is, and if its being used to the maximum potential. Why does the client want the logo bigger, and will it increase that potential in a way you weren't aware of? In comments (and chat) ...


4

There's some good answers here. To add to them, I'd take the opportunity to talk to your client about brand identity and the overall branding they may (or may not) have. Most 'stylish' companies that the client may think of have a lot more going on with their brand identity than just their logo. Their logo is important--perhaps the most important part--and ...


4

Bootstrap is intended to be edited. They have a LESS variable list of overrides including the base font size, which then can get increased/decreased depending on your font choice and preference. Those sizes are then adjusted using mathmetical logic for other assets (like buttons, headings, menus, etc). In addition, you could change everything about the ...


4

I want to make sure my design will look on the web exactly as it does in Photoshop or InDesign You can't. The reason is that there is no one 'exact' way your site will work on the web to begin with. Every browser, every operating system, every end-user preferences, every screen, every hardware will bring to the table some variance. This is why so ...


3

I am not getting paid for this. There's your problem. If the budget is unlimited, there is little incentive for the client to make decisions. It's just a playground at that point. So, sans budget--which really is the easiest tool to wrangle in big thinkers--you need to come up with your own structure to handle the client. Put the client to work. ...


3

I've tried a few, and one of the easiest things I've used was Framer.js. The only thing is that it requires a bit of programming, but then again, you have to learn something with every new software. This is a bit more difficult that invisionapp, but as you can see from the examples page, it's quite flexible, and you can even use the code for the final ...


3

The fact that something isn't there at all is a great indication that it is not present! If you'd like to still display the things that were 'chosen but missing' in each result element I suggest not doing it as the same elements in the same section with the only difference being styling. Rather have it be clear to the user that this section shows what ...


3

This is really good question. But I am afraid you can't standardize a style guide. There are guidelines to make one but a lot of it depends entirely on the complexity of the website you are creating. The guide you got your hands on is focused on typograhy which is by all means a really good thing. But not all websites can be understood by just that. Some ...


3

If by "web safe" you mean common on all platforms, then No. It is not. You will have to use @font-face with a web and/or app license.


3

Little surprised by some of these responses not addressing the bigger issue.... Unless I'm totally missing something here... Asking if Photoshop will or won't work with web fonts is like asking if you can surf big waves in your Honda Civic. They're not even the same realm. ANYTHING you do in PS, at some point, is gonna be spit out as an image of some ...


2

I think the logic is flawed. I choose some amenities and as a result I expect to see ONLY hotels that combine these amenities. You should inform the user that there is NO hotels that have all the amenities and maybe let them see the results with missing amenities by clicking another button. The red crossed button works well in my opinion. If there are users ...


2

Another option along the lines of invisionapp is https://marvelapp.com/ Basically it can take your static mockups (psd, png, jpeg, etc) from dropbox and turn them into interactive demos including buttons etc. It's pretty sweet and free, check it out.


2

Yes, at least when it comes to dragging out ruler guides, like you appear to be doing. When dragging a ruler onto the canvas, hold the shift key and your guide will be constrained to the 'ticks' on the ruler. So when viewing at 100%, as you drag, your guide will snap to every 10 pixel increment. You can snap to every single pixel by zooming in to 1200%, ...



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