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8

The best way to learn how to create websites and applications is to actually do it, meaning you should create projects, and to do it all the time. This short video conveys the emotions of a newcomer and gives some good advice on the subject. However, just as you can't speak languages you don't know any words in, you need a good understanding of the basics ...


5

A scrollable menu makes sense on a phone where you have limited screen real estate and an easy intuitive touch-to-swipe UI. A scrollable menu on a desktop web site, however, is just a way to hide navigation. It's not all that usable. Having to use a mouse to scroll back and forth to find the particular menu item I am looking for is not a good user ...


4

Whether or not a website is effective is primarily dependent on the intended purposes of the website and the usability of it. As such, one of the two choices should not apply to every company. If the purpose of the website is to be a static page much like a print work/flyer but happens to be on the web, for example when it's meant only to provide the ...


4

So my question is how can it be that 12pt in photoshop look different than 12pt in web? For a couple of reasons. They are different mediums with different font-rendering engines. Put simply, Photoshop is not a web browser. It doesn't render based on CSS and HTML. Points, for measuring type, isn't an exact measurement. Points refer to the bounding box ...


4

In addition to the great advice Yisela offers and the comments by DA01, I'll add a couple points. Users won't intuitively know they can drag to scroll - It's not immediately obvious that it's a horizontal menu, it's even less obvious that one can use touch and throw to navigate it. I'm not sure how you could remedy this besides showing users a helpful ...


4

I think for a single level, the menu is perfect. It's the sub-menu that I believe might have some usability issues when it comes to people not so familiar with different types of navigation. Some observations: The arrows make it clear that you can scroll horizontally, and although you said you are still playing with the implementation, their size can be a ...


4

Designing a graphics for a header is not just designing the image, but knowing how the header will look overall. If you provide only the image, there is a chance the other person making the website put just a tini little version, or a deformed one for example. So the first step is to prepare a canvas simulating diferent screen devices, let's say: 1920 ...


3

As long as you are using shapes and the pen tool in Illustrator it really doesn't matter. Letters that are converted to paths are fine too. Not sure about the other tools. Since you are creating vector graphics with those tools (when using Illustrator) they can be enlarged infinitely without loss of quality. Save your files in EPS, AI, PDF or SVG. Those ...


3

The degree of reflection depends greatly on many factors - business type, business size, audience demographics, etc. - but in almost all cases poor design does reflect upon any company. If a business does not feel the need to extend resources or efforts into its brand or collateral materials that carries with it connotations of either limited resources or ...


3

There's no stock answer to this other than "you get out of something what you put into it." Sometimes you don't need much of anything out of a web site other than listing one's address, business hours and maybe a phone number. A Facebook page can do that. Sometimes a web site is the primary point of interaction with a customer and a good user experience ...


3

You can't save it in the same PSD, but you can provide a separate Actions file. To do so create a new Action set, then place the Action(s) inside it. You'll then be able to use Save Actions from the flyout menu to save an Actions file with just the Action(s) you want to send to your developer.


3

In this context, the " here is acting as an icon, not punctuation. It's a visual clue as to the context of the block of text, indicating what it is and why it was pulled from the document flow. This also explains why they are always styled differently to regular text: larger, bolder, often using a secondary colour, and often taken from a completely ...


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Another option is to make a pdf file that the users can download and print. Web browsers have verey little configuration options on the printed files. Some of them just scale the photo to fit the page.


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Yes. Namely because that though they are type marks (the quotes) they are often being used as graphical elements in the context of pull quotes. A pull quote, essentially, is just a bit of text 'pulled out' of the normal flow visually. What that visual is doesn't follow any particular rules other than it needs to contrast with the rest of the content enough ...


2

Just my opinion..... Does my website have a professional, high-end feel? Why are why not? No. Using 3 separate typefaces - sans serif, serif, and script confuses the message. This is compounded when you change fonts mid-sentence like you've done with the script in the page content. "Creative designer of upscale and high-end" is an incomplete sentence. ...


2

Good design is less about decoration and ornamentation and much more about careful management of spacing, fonts, and color. Just as a starter, this design might be better if you removed or desaturated all of the color. Maybe just go grayscale. At the very least, the design won't get in the way of sharing your creation.


1

The answer depends on your layout. If you are using a raster element (jpg, gif, png) the best size is the maximum size required in the layout. Be careful as large images will result in an increased wait time to load the file on a browser. Some tips with raster: try to break the image in to elements eg. separate the logo from the background in web ...


1

Add this after your piece of CSS and before the closing semi-colon: !important So: body { font-family: 'Syncopate', sans-serif!important; } This will bazooka through any other style settings (unless they also use !important). Also, remember that: http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Syncopate' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'> should be: ...


1

Baseline grid are used to create a system of vertical rhythm and matching baselines between columns. This is extremely difficult to do in web design for a number of reasons. One of the main reasons this is so difficult on the web is because of line-height. Text is placed roughly in the middle and may render differently based on the browser you're using, ...


1

Photoshop & Browser both are different so it is possible in text size. i also have this problem so i Google it and find http://pxtoem.com You can see it how font size work and which font size you can use for your text.


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They basically want to be able to provide sketch-ups to customers for each device This never works. Never. Wireframes aren't responsive. They're approximations of what the code may render. That's hard enough when we're talking a single Photoshop file being converted into a HTLM file, but pretty much impossible when we're talking responsiveness. The ...


1

Wow. That's like saying: "I have good design skills but I don't know to turn my design into a functioning website. Can you tell me how to write HTML, CSS, Javascript etc?" There is a lot involved here and we don't really know you or your background. I suppose the key here is for you to have an idea of what topics you have to cover and for you to understand ...


1

Other answers from Scott, DA01, and Zach Saucier (the ones posted at the time I'm writing this) are very solid. I'll just address some of the other stuff buried in your question: How would you explain the advantages of a professionally designed website over a cheap DIY website? Business owners speak in ROI. Return on Investment. You need to show them that ...


1

Adding to Scott's answer, the reason the font size is very different in Photoshop or web could be because Photoshop uses points, while web uses pixels (or ems, which I would strongly recommend against px). The calculation for the relationship would be something like: Font size in pixels / font size in points = browser dpi (96) / Photoshop image ...


1

Well, 2 diferent questions here. 1) You need to configure your export settings of the pdf. The pdf for printing probably has the images in 300 dpi, cmyk, and with zip compression or no compression at all. So you need to configure the export settings to rgb, jpg compression, and lets say 100 dpi on the images. The fonts must be embeded in the file, and ...


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If you want your mockup to look like it would look in the browser, then you need to start designing in the browser. Dreamweaver would be the one Adobe product for that, but most of us that have to write HTML/CSS/JS have given up on DW long ago. Just too many bugs and it tends to get in the way more than anything. Otherwise, Photoshop, InDesign, ...


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It depends on your own personal style / processes more than anything, and what you're going to do with the designs afterwards. A lot of people need photoshop because they cut slices out of it afterwards, other people who hand code every piece of css and don't use slices, images, sprites etc might find a piece of paper and a pencil just as suitable. ...


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The snowflake animation for Winter Bash was written by balpha in 2012, and is described in this post by him on meta.SE: I wrote it for last year's Winter Bash, and I actually promised to open source it after some code clean-up, which to my shame I still, one year later, haven't done yet. I made it my mission that if Stack Exchange recycles the ...



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