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7

I actually have exactly these clauses in my contract. Client agrees to review work within X days of submission by Designer. Designer will endeavor to meet all deadlines set; however, if Client does not review work in a timely manner, Designer is not responsible for missed deadlines. So IF this client is worth doing the work for, AND IF you think you can ...


4

This is a very common problem when it comes to creative or web work. The way I've seen other agencies deal with it, and the way we handle it, is to specify duration of engagement during estimate or bid stage, with disclaimer that work beyond original engagement is billed separately.


4

If you already agreed upon a price with a contract, and said contract doesn't outline any penalties for your client due to them failing to stick with the timeline, it, alas, does mean it will cost you money. Going forward, you need to be a lot more explicit in your contract with this client. I'd suggest the following type of clause: "Estimate is dependent ...


4

Google doesn't provide ready made PSDs, no, but they provide better things. Check out Google's Material Design Specifications which is packed with all sorts of guidelines of how to design in a material way, from the style and layout to usability and animations. If you're looking for help on the coding/implementation side, you can check out Material Design ...


4

The short answer is: there is none. If you want your website to be prepared for use in the wide, wild world, you should keep any screen width between, say, 480 and 4800px in mind. Modern designers for responsive webdesigns (designs that adapt to the width of the viewport) work with ranges of widths. Each range has its own quirks to adapt the website to the ...


3

If you are frustrated with how your design tools render designs vs. the browser, then the solution is to start spending more of your time designing in the browser. The reality is that the web is built with HTML CSS and JS. It's not build with Photoshop or Illustrator. So it's best to get into the actual medium as soon as possible. In your case, you do have ...


3

There's different ways to answer this. Purely from a visual/graphic design standpoint, yes, you can space your text in any way you see fit to make it look good. Often we need to adjust typography optically by hand to make things 'feel' right even if mathematically they are off. Technically, it depends on the context of your markup. If this is one ...


3

Sure, it's perfectly acceptable. There's no rule saying you can't. With that being said, the two things you have to consider most are Responsiveness - If the screen or container size is too small then some text may be pushed to the next line which messes up the whole styling. Changing text later on - If the text is changed on a later date to something ...


3

I can not personally recommend a website to find what you are looking for due to the fact I create my own, I will suggest using more precise terms when attempting a search query. If you are looking for buttons, icons, and other such things. Using these terms will allow you to better sort through the vast amount of images. Don't forget to use the term ...


3

I'd suggest images should be enough to show proper UX/UI and a concept. If there's specific functionality that you're looking to sell based off of (like jQuery calculator or advanced animation), then include a link to the live site, but honestly - only if you control it or can be sure it's maintained. I learned long ago that pointing to sites from a ...


2

I don't think google offers any "ready to use" PSDs but you can find some free PSD provided by other users here If you need some inspiration in Material Design, google has a page for that https://www.google.com/design/


1

You need to test the compatibility on diferent target devices, mainly mobil ones to see if your background works. According to this: http://caniuse.com/#feat=svg-css It is now safe to use it inline. If the image is a flat design I would use a png. I would not use a svg for background, just for diagrams. I do not think a background needs to be "that" ...


1

Try to check "Preserve Illustrator editing capabilities" while saving, it should fix the problem. Moreover, be sure that: "responsive" is not checked your artwork isn't bigger than your canvas your canvas' size doesn't contains decimal values I use Illustrator to generate .svg for the web and it works pretty well.


1

Here is a link to some resources for psd templates. material design resources


1

Blending modes do not exist outside of Photoshop. There's no way around that. You will need to construct the image so that it does not rely on blending modes for its appearance.


1

In general, it's a question of preference. But yes, designers should always keep in mind the target market, and a rule a lot of us forget is: Is it readable, is it clear? Some designers prefer to be "artsy" and others are more practical. On screen: Gray can be easier to read if you use a dark gray. With a black at 100% on pages with a lot of text, it ...


1

Grids are used in all forms of design to all you to easily organise your page(web or otherwise). There are many different types of grids people use. Some are responsive while others are not. Check out http://960.gs/ as an example of a web grid system. Most designers will find a system that suits them and what they are designing, for example. Using the 960 ...



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