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0

If that's what masta wants, that's what masta gets. He's the client. He's paying you. It's his website. You can push a little, and try to get your point through and explain it fifteen ways from Sunday, but ultimately it's the clients choice. If you decide to get too pushy and take a stance, you'll lose the job.


3

By convention, most styling should be placed in the <body> element. But there is one important reason to apply styles to the <html> element itself: when you are setting the default font styles, in particular font-size. This is because the <html> tag is the root element, thus rem (root em unit) sizing is based on whatever is set for the ...


-1

you are supposed to apply styling to body tag. Like set the background color to white, set font, font color, font size etc. You should always use external style sheets. For better management and handling, you should use multiple style sheets. body { background-color: #56473 ; font-family: Arial; font-size: 1.3em; margin: 5px; or anything you want here.


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A footer is a wayfinding device and wayfinding devices are important for users when navigating a web site. To remove it on only some pages is to introduce inconsistency for no real benefit. As for the client is always right, that's true. But it's your job to convince them what is right to begin with. :) (And remember, we don't always succeed at that. Some ...


1

I like your question, plus one, but I think you should reflect on the issue that is still missing in this Q&A and it's the content that would be in the footer and the intentions of the site's experience. While Zach's view on footers aren't necessary I disagree with that aspect. If this site is a specialized eCommerce site, which isn't mentioned at this ...


-3

You are right, the footer is not going to distract a visitor. If you are insisted, you can make it blind or write it in comments also. Blind as in match it with the background color so that it is only visible when the whole page is selected and not otherwise. I would suggest though that you should write your brand details as comments anyway.


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Ultimately it is the customer's site. So long as it is within the contract, meaning you're not doing extra work for no extra pay, the customer has the final say. All we can do in such a circumstance is strongly recommend one way or the other and provide evidence as to why we believe that. Footers, while helpful, are not necessary by any means for some ...


5

Web sites can contain JPEG, GIF,PNG, SVG format graphics. Which ones should be used, and when? For photos: JPEG if there is no need for transparency. PNG for photo graphics that need transparency. Whilst not 100% true, it's a good rule of thumb. Check out the other answers to this question to learn more about the other formats. Also, check out ...


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Even though SVG isn't globally accepted and some people have a frustrating time scaling PNGs, I have always found that creating an icon within Adobe Illustrator works best at scaling up or down a "reasonable" amount.


0

A few months ago I came across an app called InVision. It provides the ability to upload mockups and their revisions, create interactive prototypes, and the ability to leave a comment on a specific area of the mockup. This app has improved the way I give/receive feedback and communicate with my designers and clients.


7

The browser doesn't really care which format the color is in, performance is negligible. As such, I'll focus on the decision's effects on the developer(s) and the use cases. A lot of developers find HEX values easier to read than RGB or HSL. As such, I tend to use HEX so that the next developer working on the project may have an easier job, even slightly ...


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Earlier, in 2000s sending layouts via mail was effective. Now, presentation of the design to the customer has special services. Is it designed specifically for this. Let's see how (m)maquetter.com service can help you. It is specially developed for this purpose that you cound: Quickly add the layouts of the site that you draw; Distribute layouts by ...


12

GIFs For most simple animations, a gif is often the best way to go, especially when they don't require much interaction, are as detailed as the illustration you linked and don't need to have a dynamic width (gifs, like any image, can be blurry at times if their widths is changed). The animation you linked could be just a gif and a transparent overlay to ...


-1

The issue mentioned here like "Made by this and that". WE usually have this statement in agreement for the web-design or development that client must have to show developers/designer's name in footer of website just as a trademark. But there can be an agreement which clearly describe about no developers information. So, if you own the page, and you didn't ...


2

In my experience, when doing static animations (animations that are not intended for any interaction with the user) I found that what best worked for me was animating the illustrations in After Effects and after that exporting the final result to a .GIF file. This makes the animation absolutely browser-friendly and guarantees identical visualisation in any ...


1

I think there is some information missing in this question. I think you should clarify "paid". You may own the content but the development should be credited. Some sites are credited such as "Designed By: Joe Blow and Developed By: Friday". You should consult with the terms, if there is one when you purchased the site. If this is a built theme you ...


3

First off, it sounds like you probably didn't have a written contract. Based on that assumption, I further speculate that you probably had a verbal agreement. Now, if the agreement was specifically "give me a reduced rate and you can put your name on the website", then no you should run any changes past him, and work out a different agreement if he doesn't ...


1

Don't add the button/link to the page until its ready. It makes your website/client look like they are making overly broad claims, and have no content to back it up. Back up every claim/service/product with a page explaining it. Honestly if you have the time to create an "under construction" page, then its often better to spend 5 minutes more and create ...


0

I think you misunderstand the term "non-commercial". What non-commercial means is "not for business". The school is a business and use of images for any institution - school or otherwise - would constitute commercial use. It makes no difference that you aren't directly making money from the images themselves. (which you generally can't do in any case unless ...


2

I'm going to presume, for sake of a clean answer, that you'll be using "Creative Commons" licensed images. (You can set a search on Google and Flickr to look for only "CC-licensed images".) Creative commons licenses will always specify exactly what you can and cannot do, in what circumstances. Nearly every license will begin with "If you use this image, you ...


1

I'd recommend going to the Rounced rectangle options and setting: Fill to none Stroke and Stroke width to what ever color / width you want. You'll need to have one of the shape tools selected to see these options. Alternatively... These can also be found in the Window > Properties Shape Stroke was introduced in Photoshop CS6.


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Don't change the layer's blending mode. After you apply the stroke go to your Layer Panel and where it says Fill: 100% lower that to 0. It's directly below Opacity


1

Images (PNG, GIF, JPG, etc) are always rectangular. So if the intent is to make image-based rollovers, yes, they would be rectangular. Options: create an image map for each image that triggers the rollover use one large image, with each image map region triggering a swap of the overall image Note that while image maps still have their place, these ...


2

If the goal is to improve the end-user experience, then the key is that you improve the content more than anything. Ideally you'd: use plain language--not legalese reduce the amount of language offer a summary use good overall typography (an appropriate place to start: http://typographyforlawyers.com/ ) make it possible to easily make an offline copy ...


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We recently did a comparison of major file optimization apps - https://www.oss-usa.com/blog/faster-sites-are-way-better-slower-sites While Photoshop can do file optimization, it is not the ideal tool to get it done - there are specific add ons and free services that can get the job done even better.


0

Bear in mind that on larger projects everything you design has to get approved by multiple stakeholders on the client side, sometimes including legal and compliance. So while getting client approval on PSD for desktop version and executing responsive states as you see fit is a streamlined solution, it is not suitable for every project and Photoshop remains ...


0

The industry standard is to code in an IDE. There is no industry standard for designing a full site in PSD because if you're trying to design to be responsive you would have to design for every viewport and the time it would take you to do it you could have developed the entire site in code. I would suggest using Photoshop or Illustrator for the wireframe ...


2

What application do most designers use to design websites? There is no standard. In fact, many designers don't even use one specific app. It's usually a combination of raster illustration software (Photoshop, Pixelmator, etc.), vector illustration software (Illustrator, Inkscape), wireframeing tools (Balsamiq, Axure, etc), text editors (Coda, Xcode, the ...


1

PSD = PhotoShop Data file. If you want to create PSDs, you will need Photoshop.


-1

Interestingly, you could create a design with 72dpi and when done, flatten all layers, then rasterise. This reduces the image 60% more. I found this solution from self discovery, it works.


-1

Try to use the service (m) maquetter.com. It solves those problems that you specified. See an example (mqttr.com/example). This service is meant for convenient presentation of layouts to a client. And the client is not required to have any technical skills for reviewing the project. You can easily load all of your layouts to demonstrate them to the client ...


2

I show the clients my design(s), and then I "sell" it to them. I explain why each element or function was chosen. I feel I am "expert" so I lay it all on the table by explaining why something will work and why something else won't, or why anything, etc... Most of the time this will bring the client back down to Earth and they will see things "my way". I try ...


1

It sounds like you need to read this book before this becomes a situation you routinely find yourself in: Design is a Job, by Mike Monteiro Everyone pointing out that you aren't getting paid for this is might sound like a horse being repeatedly beaten to death, but it's a well deserved horse beating. Small projects have just as many thorns as big ...


7

I don't feel it's a matter of being "user friendly". It's a matter of presentation. An incompletely design carries with it a stigma or connotation that you're okay showing off incompletel, unfinished work/products. If the site is customer-oriented (selling a product/service) this indicates that there's no attention to detail perhaps or maybe no ...


0

I think this depends on the content, context and aims of the site. The clearer the differentiation between modules that serve different purposes the better. Remember that proximity in design plays a role in how we relate things. If two things are close, we perceive them as related. If they are apart/separated, they must be separate.


0

Steve Krug's 'Don't make me think' is an excellent read and its simple ideas will stick with you and help you in a variety of contexts. The book will give you an understanding of website design best practices from a broader usability perspective, which you can then apply to your specific needs when designing components, landing pages etc. It will also help ...


2

If you have understood your clients needs and have carefully considered a solution, then you should have sufficient rational for your decisions making it easier to win over your client. Explain to them exactly why you have done what you have done, and why it is the best solution for them at this time. Design can be perceived as objective when there is ...


12

Most of the time for live sites you should not have a page at all or, if you really want it live (perhaps to show to others and you don't have a development site), don't link to it publicly anywhere. This is because if a user sees that you have content that interests them enough to click on it, they are expecting to see the page. Having an "under ...


8

Skeuomorphism is really the opposite of flat design. Google's "Material Design" is merely their branding name for their specific interpretations of flat design. It's still flat design though. "FLat Design" was coined by Apple when they released iOS7. It caught on because it was the first term used, it could just have easily been called "Material Design" if ...


1

The problem with basing it off of font sizes is that it's a mostly arbitrary unit on a web page. By that I mean you may choose a 20pt typeface. But what does that mean? If it's the typeface you spec'ed, then you have some assumption as to how large the characters are, but if the user changes that on you, or they use a different font, or what have you, ...


0

If I understand this correctly, you want a grid based on your font size? I have personally never even bothered with this whole grid system, when designing sites, and I just do things by eye and go for what looks best. I think that if I were to try and base a grid system off of my font size, the best way to go about it would be to use em values instead of ...


1

Draw a rectangle. Use the Pen Tool to add an anchor to one side. Hold down the Option/Alt and click the anchor point again (with the Pen Tool still). This will convert the new anchor to a corner point rather than a smooth point. This ensures the paths remain straight rather than curved. Use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow) to select and drag that ...


1

As others have pointed out, it's impossible. Common methods like disabling right-click, using CSS background and other scripts are fairly easy to avoid. The user can simply take a screenshot of your website, and then crop image. I think watermarking the image is a much more effective way. This can be done manually (using Photoshop, Gimp or other tools), or ...


4

Doorknob is right; it's impossible to prevent users from downloading the image. Any safeguard you put in place can be bypassed. Blocking Right Click is easily thwarted by disabling JavaScript (or modifying the script if necessary). You can, however, employ other methods to protect your assets. Watermarking is one way to guard your copyrighted images. Take a ...


14

For all intents and purposes, this is downright impossible. You can disable right click, but people can still view the source code of your page (by adding view-source: to the URL in Chrome, or just using a browser menu) and find the URL. You can use a CSS background-image instead of HTML <img>, but people can still use their browser's inspector (F12 ...


0

kvambaam: You can always go the easy route of taking their corporate colors, making pretty grid-based layout using flat design and calling it a day. Or you can start from examining your client's needs: Get access to their Google analytics data to see what browsers / devices are used to access their site Confirm with client that these are relevant for ...


1

I have a web designing business and the first thing you did wrong was not getting paid for the original design. There are a lot of free templates for people to use if they don't want to pay so you have to make it clear from start you need so much for a down payment to began. Half would be great to start with, never create more than one design unless you are ...



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