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1

This site looks great! I think it is presents a very classy look which is exactly the kind of market a gastropub or any kind of craft beer place is looking for. You've done an awesome job so far and I think the client will be happy. For me, a bit is lost on the menu with the display font for the menu items. It would read a lot easier if you had one main ...


1

Overall, I think you have too many misleading elements. There is a lack of similarity between them. For example, I'm not sure where the logo ends or starts, but it has all kinds of curves. Those squiggly shapes are too much in contrast with the straight lines. The "Menu" font looks nice, but it looks more like a display font and not for a heading, maybe ...


0

Could you have the icons fade between the two colors as the background fades? This could be a simple CSS animation class (highly suggested) or anything as complicated as you want.


1

Nope. Maybe. Probably not. First of all, for the people in doubt, you most certainly can use webfonts in Photoshop, if you're able to download the required font formats. This allows you to get an idea on how your type is going to look on the web, not an exact representation. Why? Well, simply put Photoshop and InDesign offer some tools that browsers do not ...


5

I want to make sure my design will look on the web exactly as it does in Photoshop or InDesign You can't. The reason is that there is no one 'exact' way your site will work on the web to begin with. Every browser, every operating system, every end-user preferences, every screen, every hardware will bring to the table some variance. This is why so ...


4

Little surprised by some of these responses not addressing the bigger issue.... Unless I'm totally missing something here... Asking if Photoshop will or won't work with web fonts is like asking if you can surf big waves in your Honda Civic. They're not even the same realm. ANYTHING you do in PS, at some point, is gonna be spit out as an image of some ...


4

Bootstrap is intended to be edited. They have a LESS variable list of overrides including the base font size, which then can get increased/decreased depending on your font choice and preference. Those sizes are then adjusted using mathmetical logic for other assets (like buttons, headings, menus, etc). In addition, you could change everything about the ...


0

I'd like to use illustrator for my web layout, with swatches, symbol and multiple page handling, but... but, I work for a company where PhotoShop is the way to interact with IT department. I use a single psd file and layer comps to handle different state of my layout. It's a bugged function, when you move a layer you have to re-check all comps but is the ...


0

On Dreamstime, if you dont find the image you need, you can ask someone to design/photograph them in the forums and they will be the same price as a regular royalty free image, check here. There will be plenty photographers willing to help and do the shooting you need.


1

Depending on what software you use, making a bigger picture for the "master" can be useful. While reducing the size with a different program from the one used to create the image can sometimes cause issues, it is MUCH harder to take a small image and make it larger. That said if you create the image in photoshop, I would definitely suggest using an even ...


1

Does making pictures with bigger dimensions than actually needed enhance their quality? No. In the end, you're still left with the same amount of image data as if you had started at that size.


0

I would create the image with the dimensions you are going to use. Creating a larger image then cutting the size can cause the image to look worse because of downsampling. I'm not sure if thats what your looking for. What are you talking about 300 x 200 paper?


4

If by "web safe" you mean common on all platforms, then No. It is not. You will have to use @font-face with a web and/or app license.


1

There are web safe fonts and online font resources you can reference, and technologies for web typography using fonts change quickly and so are guidelines. I tried using Web Preflight (https://www.oss-usa.com/web-preflight?promo=web-preflight) for initial pass on Photoshop web designs, works pretty well.


0

You won't win the designer of the year for that. But the less there is, the less there is to dislike I guess. Your yellow version of the icon has ellipses taller than wide: It is weird looking and even weirder as a mustard on gray when it is put in the browser tab icon. If you are going to make a browser tab icon then just make it dark gray or black. It ...


0

If you were a 'Lazy Bones' you could probably find the separate elements on a stock website - Pirate/bones/illustration and fluffy/white/clouds - make your self a blue sky background and 'Bobs your uncle'


1

I think the website design works. I like your transitions for the header links. Clear and concise communication. Color palette reminds me of a nutrition company or similar. I think font choice works well for tech-related website. I would probably scrap the serif face for a complimentary sans-serif face, but that's purely personal taste. Also, I noticed ...


2

I don't know the style it's called. I call it "2D flat art," with a retro 20s/30s texture feel for added texture. The approach uses a limited color palette. The basic way to create this art is to use a darker color of the object's color as the shadow color. If the jacket is red, the shadow would be a darker red, with no gradients; hence, "flat". Flash, ...


1

This isn't so much an illustrative technique so much as it is a rendering one. These are likely Illustrator vector graphics that have had textures applied after the fact. Creative Bloq has a nice tutorial on adding textures to vector illustrations.


-3

It seems to be a variation of Flat UI design.


0

I don't think there are any absolute rules here. The guiding principle is that you want to create a visual distinction between your title and your body copy, but you still want both to be harmonious. Within that guideline, I think that the title sans-serif with normal casing doesn't distinguish from a sans-serif body copy, unless you were to do something ...


-1

Dmitri, Your buttons look fine, could be the monitor or browser zoom.


0

Rms, Feedback call to action can be either a popup like on quorumfcu.org or a sliding button on a side, like on oss-usa.com - depends whether you're integrating existing 3rd party technology that has specific requirements or designing for custom code implementation. I would start by asking client what plugin they'd like to use for feedback and work off ...


1

What happened in the end - and that was a request from the customer, was that we added an overlay on the whole page when the menu is visible. You can see it in action here: http://nabilgholam.com/all-projects (the website is now live, finally) I'm even less sure what to pick as accepted answer, now.


-1

Or probably you could go up here - http://www.freeimages.com/ for free stock images.


-2

Obviously you must ask! If work has got delayed, there must be some reasons behind it.


1

I have used these style guide templatesbased on the style tiles concept & template. They're good for the early stages when you're exploring styles, not so much for specifications for when you're actually building the product.


4

There's some good answers here. To add to them, I'd take the opportunity to talk to your client about brand identity and the overall branding they may (or may not) have. Most 'stylish' companies that the client may think of have a lot more going on with their brand identity than just their logo. Their logo is important--perhaps the most important part--and ...


-3

I run into this issue a lot and have started making the logo smaller than I would normally want so when they ask me to make the logo larger, I just say OK and bump it up to the size I would have made it to begin with :P


4

I think the best answer above is the first sentence of Adam's but then he drifts into the same pitfall the other answers have. You need to identify what the value of the logo is, and if its being used to the maximum potential. Why does the client want the logo bigger, and will it increase that potential in a way you weren't aware of? In comments (and chat) ...


3

This is really good question. But I am afraid you can't standardize a style guide. There are guidelines to make one but a lot of it depends entirely on the complexity of the website you are creating. The guide you got your hands on is focused on typograhy which is by all means a really good thing. But not all websites can be understood by just that. Some ...


1

A good source I often use if I want to find out the technologies used to create a webpage/website is BuiltWith.com -- it's not 100% perfect but it at least gives you a good headstart.


1

If we are looking at the same thing. I think: 1) It is http://jquery.malsup.com/cycle2/api/ You can see by inspect the event listeners on any tab elements. From there you can see lots of registered listener with prefix cycle-* google these event names since it likely to be in the documentation. And you will get http://jquery.malsup.com/cycle2/api/ 2) Those ...


2

You can examine the source code of any page to discover what is driving it. 1) It's custom javascript the page calls "Tabzilla" A link to the javascript can be acquired by examining the source code of the home page. 2) The shadows are simply CSS3 box-shadow properties. As for "step-by-step instructions" that's nearly impossible here. There's simply not ...


10

Consider exploring their reasons for a larger logo, and trying to fix the underlying problem, or suggesting that the website isn't the best place to fix it. For instance, some simply have an aversion to white space. You'll need to help them understand good layout practices, and that appropriately used whitespace will highlight their logo better than making ...


5

I always try to educate clients on the many goods of white space. It's not just about size, it's about context. If someone wants a huge logo that makes the whole site look clattered, you can prepare some mockups to let them compare what which version really stands out. On the one side, the one with a big logo where the message invades your eye real state. ...


25

I point out to clients that large logos are the equivalent to SCREAMING at customers. When you walk into a store, do you want the sales rep to come up to you and scream, "HI! WHAT CAN I GET FOR YOU TODAY?!" or would you rather have the rep walk up and quietly ask, "Hi, what can I help you with today?" (It carries more weight when spoken :) ) I ask them to ...


6

I would suggest creating an alternative CSS class or ID for the logo and preserve your existing CSS styles under a comment. If the site is responsive and you are using an SVG, I would complete the clients request and show examples of why it will not work. The issue most designers face is that some people cannot see a project visually in their head and they ...


1

They don't in fact you'll be hard pressed to find a modern computer that does. Its a historical remnant. So today it just means screen resolution. (the value has to be something in many formats). So is it really useless to create an image larger than 72 ppi if the browser will only render it at 72 ppi? No the value never comes to play. Resolution can ...


0

PPI is pixels per inch. That is a measure of pixel density, at 72 pixels/inch. Resolution is total amount of pixels at width x height, or 1680x1050. Density = total pixels / total inches


2

Laura, While tagline in the header might interfere with already established design, it will help with SEO and resulting website visibility since this text can be tagged as H1 or H2. What we did on our site www.oss-usa.com was to include small text blurbs under the header, which can still be tagged in HTML as header styles. I would assume that organic ...


4

One thing I noticed is your use of punctuations. You may use them as you like in informal situations, but if we're talking about professional typography, you need to remember these rules: Any punctuation mark only appears one at a time. You have used ??, .. and .... in many places. In your question too, you're missing them in some places. If you want to ...


2

There is a Playboy bunny rabbit logo on the tail of one of your planes. If you're in Mubai you don't know, but it's a magazine of naked women. You probably do not want that on a professional site! Speaking of that, depending on what you want to show off, it might or might not be an issue that the graphics all on the front page came from somewhere else. ...


4

Visually, it's cute. Nice work on that. Structurally, it's lacking. When you have to explain what to click on to navigate the site, the navigation is broken. Asking a user to read that they need to click on an image of a balloon to actually get to the content of your site (the portfolio) is not intuitive. I'd also rethink calling yourself 'crazy'. :)


0

Wow it's awesome! The font is readable so it's appropriate in my opinion. It is user friendly except not everybody knows at e.g. 'connect' that they have to click the satellite to open up the contact form. Also: I saw this when I opened up the site: Greetings


2

I would just like to add that a good deal of companies - particularly in the software business - tend to have names that does not convey what they actually do. Firefox, Google, Thunderbird, StackExchange are all examples of names you have to know what they do. Seems obvious to us now, but once it was no so. Then a tagline/blurb might well be helpful. And ...


5

This is a very subjective answer. But I'll try. It depends entirely on what the tagline is about. Does it describe the work they do? Like for example- ABC, interactive production studio. See here Does it say a very unique story about the brand in an original way- Like this How are they using their tagline in the rest of their branding material? Do you see ...


0

Well a tagline can be informative to other people. give it to them, from people with higher understanding read this paragraph about their suggestion... "Companies, online publications, educational institutions and non-profit organizations use site taglines to convey what makes it worthwhile. These critical elements are also part of website's conversion ...


1

In the specific case of MailChimp they have made their framework available for public use here- http://ux.mailchimp.com/patterns/ You will also find nuggets of their design process in their blog articles and if you subscribe to their newsletter. They also warn that it isn't like Twitter Bootstrap and a lot of it has been tailored to have suited their needs. ...


4

Im on the fence drinking a soda about posting this as an answer but the answer I am going to provide you, I might make into a reference later on when others ask this similar question.. As you stated you're already in the design phase... If you followed a proper workflow (since you haven't mentioned IF you had a mockup, content evaluation, wireframe ...



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