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0

Don't overthink this - decide what you want your portfolio to do (highlight skills, demonstrate technical proficiency, get you jobs that you like) and design for that. If it helps to have an audience in mind, then sure, generate some personas to test against. But as others have noted, for personas to be really useful, they should be based on actual ...


1

Illustrator layers I've successfully used Illustrator to mock up site and application states in a collaborative environment. The trick is highly organized use of layers. Collect all element layers of a view in a parent group. Within the parent, collect states in their own groups, including modal views. For some things, like simple button changes, it ...


0

Noting user's personas is good for thinking about user flow and user experience, of which there is very little for a personal portfolio site. As such, who the recruiter is and their background is pretty irrelevant for portfolio sites. As it seems like you're looking to create a personal website/portfolio that is relevant to recruiters, I'll address each of ...


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With apparel, fit is about size and shape, (or cut.) Shape is more a characteristic of style, but I think you could use an icon that illustrates the size differences, (particularly with a tool called "VirtuSize".) I would consider something like this:


0

So this is obviously a long way from a real icon, but hopefully it shows you the idea: The idea being that you could share some kind of figure with some sort of article of clothing fitting over top of it.


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I think if you're a smaller company following the IAB Display Guidelines makes the most sense. Most of the Google Sizes are inside the IAB already, but for smaller publishers it gives other options as well while making it easy for advertisers to use ads across platforms. While Google's Doubleclick is the big dog, its not the only Ad Serving Platform. Other's ...


2

I'm not sure there really is a definitive answer to this, as it's often up to the site on which you wish to display your ads, how their site is designed, and where in that design they place their ads. The best thing to do is to ask the site which size(s) they prefer. Most companies will have some sort of "Media Guide" or documentation outlining the ...


1

I think representing the article of clothing as an indicator would work well. It's already what the user is shopping for, so I think it is clear that this would be used as a size indicator. You could express the right size for the user in 2 different ways. One idea would be to use as a badge with the right size displaying inside of the icon. The other way ...


5

I don't understand what you are calling "Persona". Is that like an avatar or a pet? In spanish that just mean people. But I'm posting some diagrams. When you make some creative work you have this 3 elements. As we are in the Graphic design industry the artist is "Me". In some cases a person can be 2 elements at once, for example a portrait photography ...


3

First off, the purpose of a portfolio is to show off the work that you've created and give the viewer an impression of what you're capable of in addition to the style that you have. That means that it should be focused around the work you create, not any persona. Companies seeking out the level of production and feel that you show in your portfolio will ...


0

The stick people and the other objects are vector objects that are created using Adobe Illustrator. The original creator used the Pen Tool, and all sorts of vector shapes to create the stick people and text image that they wanted. Then, they saved their Illustrator File (.AI file extension), and exported it to Adobe Photoshop then added the "folded paper" ...


0

I don't see much in those images. They seem to be simple illustrations. You can use dingbat fonts selectively. Like choose a shape from one font, choose the other from another, design one yourself. Please see this link http://www.dafont.com/mtheme.php?id=7&fpp=50&text=american+AMERICAN+EXPEDITION


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Take that job and make a good looking webdesign in Photoshop, then send me the PSDs doc , i'll convert them into HTML CSS as I am expert in this field. Contact me at Skype my id is arlalsaehl . you and me can make a team. Thanks.


-1

In Web industry, to streamline your development process, Designing is done, and before final design is presented to be further developed or be tested, some other intermediate steps are involved : Step 1: Getting Inspiration : If you continually observe what other designers or sites are doing for their wireframes, you will slowly get a picture in your mind ...


1

While you're asking about the logo, I think this question has bigger implications. A logo is only one aspect of your company/brand (albeit a very important part). A distinctive design for your website (or marketing materials, or whatever it is people will see) can be just as important, depending on what it is you do. Hiring and developing a relationship ...


2

Your logo defines you and your company voice. You should work out a brief detailing what it is that your company provides services for. Once this is clear you can delve into the design of a logo as this creative brief may help point out clues that lead to a path for the logo creation. Brainstorming the basic elements of your product usually helps me in ...


2

Should you hire a [plumber] or just [fix the toilet] in a way you are not satisfied with? Should you hire a [mechanic] or just [guess what's wrong with the car] in a way you are not satisfied with? Should you hire a [lawn care service] or just [use that old push mower] in a way you are not satisfied with? This isn't a graphic design question. It's a ...


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If you're asking this question, 99% of the time you should hire someone. By asking this question you show that at least one (likely all of) the following are true: You care about the design enough to want it to be done very well (as you should). You don't feel very confident in your own ability to create a great logo. You don't have a very clear goal in ...


2

If you need profesional help depends if you want a profesional look on your company or not. It would be an interesting topic to analyze about how people starting a company want everything done by themselves. This could be a budget issue, but sometimes is about being afraid of delegate things. There are things to consider in a logo besides personal ...


2

Nothing in graphic designing is difficult as the difficulty of designing a Logo. The logo is summarizing in a visual language your concept. it is your idea about your company and the way people will remember you. It is something like nativity. So first before thinking about Colors and shapes. Think about the idea ... The Concept behind your service. The ...


2

Designing a logo is tricky. You need to take many surprising factors into account. Some of the things include aspect ratio, printabiliity, scalability, colors for print web and black and white, uniqueness etc etc... There are also all kinds of skill factors involved. A person that has done it before can help because they now some of the caveats. In reality ...


0

I think what you want is a website builder tool like Webflow or Divshot. It brings the best of both worlds: design flexibility of Photoshop and the HTML/CSS result will be rendered in browser exactly as same as the way you intended when designing it (because basically you are creating inside a browser). There are several options such as Webflow ...


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I've been designing logos for 20 years and designing a logo for yourself is a difficult task. You need a good design process, time and confidence. If you can afford a good designer I would recommend that. If time is important then use a distinctive font and come back to the logo later. Many successful businesses have revised logos that are nothing like the ...


2

The form appears to be non-public, so 700 values really isn't that unreasonable. First things I see are improper use of inputs. #21/22/18/32 should be radio buttons, not checkboxes (cannot be multiple values). And a number of checkboxes are far too short (4, 6, 19, 20 etc). Greatly increases the chance for input error. people will read the form for ...


2

You need to split the questions up and you shouldn't have them on one single page. I would review the hierarchy in which the questions need to be answered and see if some of the questions can be placed in a trigger so if someone says YES to a question it will expand the other set. Look into a multipage form to prevent annoyance by the person filling it ...


0

I've read the comments and agree that the logo should be designed first... ideally! In the case that both are designed/developed at the same time, I would say that the important thing is that the website is properly made (css/html) so once you have the final colours, font, styles established for the logo the change will not be as dramatic and can just be ...


0

A verey long list does not work with human perception and human brain verey well. You need to find some category, alphabetical, theme, some sort of clasification, keywords... something. In a printed or paged document you can have pages, and you fell you have the control on the reading. But if you don't make a clasification you will have a long document, ...


1

Should I have a logo design first or after? Neither. You should have some business strategy created first. In doing this, you will gain some insights as to what your full branding strategy needs to be. A branding strategy will include a wide range of elements depending on your business and strategy. Ultimately, it will include both ...


1

I don't "design" in any application. I design on paper with a pen/pencil. I will then use Illustrator to create cleaner wireframes for presentations. I then move to using Foundation directly when starting the visual build stage. I dislike Bootstrap for the very reasons you point out -- you have to remove too much to start with a clean slate. By using a ...


2

HTML is itself quite slow That's debatable. I'd say production-ready presentation layer code takes longer to create than a quick sketch in Illustrator, but you don't necessarily need production-ready code to design in HTML, either. There really is no alternative between static mock-up tools like Illustrator and Photoshop and actual markup. There are ...


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The reality is that most "user friendly" tools you are gonna find are too limited to live in the jungle of modern webapp craft. You cannot drag N drop your way to an asset-rich and use-case finished product. So the solution is to DiY it up using an accurate [shadow]DOM: Chrome Inspector, often called DevTools https://developer.chrome.com/devtools. It has ...


1

To create the best possible design experience, design in the browser itself. And not just one browser - all of them across all devices. There is no better way to determine how something will look or function than actually testing it in that browser. By doing your design and development in the browser itself, you're doing this throughout the entire process. ...


-1

That's a great question, the chicken and the egg problem - how to design web site that can be easily and properly coded without following templates and having everything look like Google Design. I think the best you can do is follow a set on standard practices - 12 column grid, default form elements without additional styling, non-aliased live text, no ...


2

You don't need a website to have a logo, you could be a small independent shop that only sells things from a van, if you're branding is on point, you've set yourself up well. The website is an extension of the brand almost, it's a hub where information, data, functions are kept. If you're selling things, this is where that'll take place, the whole website ...


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Should I have a logo design first or after? Neither. You should have some business strategy created first. In doing this, you will gain some insights as to what your full branding strategy needs to be. A branding strategy will include a wide range of elements depending on your business and strategy. Ultimately, it will include both a logo and a web ...


-1

The way to go for me would be a lazy loading list, which loads extra information when the user is at/near the bottom of the page. The good, the bad This has a few upsides: keep load times low by only loading small amounts of data user isn't overwhelmed when loading the page no user action is required to load more info (as opposed to 'read more' buttons) ...


4

Both should ideally be designed at the same time, along with your entire brand identity. But your logo should come first. You're falling into a common folly that each design aspect has to be formed in its own world - but since you have the luxury to design both the logo and the website, you should design them both to compliment each other. But this goes ...


1

A logo should be the first consideration when establishing a brand identity. The logo design process should include a tagline, which will help to refine the company's message and support future design decisions. The company's online presence (website, social media, etc) as well as its print collateral (business card, letterhead, brochures, etc), are an ...


20

Logo first. Why? There are a few reasons: Logo is the theme of your brand [identity/property] in many ways. If you don't know your theme how are you going to capture a thematic site? Logo is your focal, you can't [accurately] build around a focal without a focal. Logo sets the color palette and perhaps other things such as font-face, drop-shadow, ...


2

To have a business running you first need the client to trust you. Then you can deliver goods. The client needs to focus the trust somewhere, your company, your person or references most likely. This is where identity kicks in, identity is what helps people to understand what entity they are dealing with. Developing a identity is called branding. I assume ...


5

This depends on the company and design process and there is no hard rule. The primary case when the initial design of a website should be made before the logo is when the purposes of the website are not clear. This is particularly true when it's a side project or a brainstorming phase. Often times I'll start working on a site and change the purposes or ...


1

Usually large amounts of info are presented in teaser mode, with "read more" appearing after certain number of characters or block height. You can also use same technique to break content into multiple "read more" or pages, with breadcrumbs and page/screen navigation.


2

Usually, the website should follow the logo. Unless the primary object of the company is it's website (if it's a webservice for example). I suppose in that case designing the website first can/should be considered.


1

a factory silhouette with an "i" in the middle? a document/open book (like a catalog)? If the tab is product-specific, why not just use the information circle with an i inside it? Or replace the tab with an information button next to the item title.


0

So, as I commented on the original post I could see some kind of tools icon, possibly placed over something representing the information part, like an "i" or instructional booklet. Some examples of the direction I'm talking about: 1, 2, 3, 4. Now, knowing that the site sells specialty sporting goods equipment I think you can customize it for that even ...


0

If you're already using font awesome, can't you use something like the 'List' icon? http://fortawesome.github.io/Font-Awesome/icon/list/


0

Why not mix in another framework? I find semantic-ui to be much easier and superior to bootstrap. They also have a much wider range of icons. http://semantic-ui.com/elements/icon.html Take a look at that page in particular under maps there is an icon called building. This might work well to represent an organisation. If you have any issues with this leave ...


2

In the scope of web design, which seems to be the scope of the OP's question, I would rather use web-related terms as opposed to trying to import typesetting terms from the (fascinating) printed media world. I would call this "vertical margin" as in the CSS margin property. The margin is the spacing between the border of adjacent elements (as opposed to the ...


0

Roughly 99% of people use monitors/mobile phones with 24 bit or 32 bit display. Dithering won't occur with these (it can still occur with 16 bit display, but it's uncommon and simply causes trivially small longer loading times). So this is mostly not an issue in terms of dithering. However, there are different reasons why the web safe colors are useful. ...


2

In typesetting terms, Slug is a common term for a horizontal gap. - Space after/before a paragraph, a horizontal gap between sections, or between rules, etc. The slug has a specified size similar to type sizes and would be placed inline with the metal type to create the proper vertical spacing. based upon the edit.... Cell padding seems the most obvious ...



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