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It's pretty easy to find a correlation between the golden ratio and the proportions of natural forms, e.g., plants and animals. Of course, the growth of natural forms is subject to variability caused by, for example, environmental factors, so you will never find a perfect correlation. Likewise if a designer consciously uses the golden section to design a ...


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There's two questions here. Let's start with the first: Why do people use the golden ratio? Because they are lazy, or just blindly following advice without putting a lot of thought behind it. The reality is that the Golden Ratio is mostly BS. Well, BS may be a bit harsh, maybe a better term is that it's mostly arbitrary. Connections to Roman ...


2

It's not that circles or golden ratios are some kind of required constant in logo design. What are constant in effective design are proportionality and similarity (or, sometimes, contrast). There are many natural ratios on which to base proportionality. The golden ratio is one, but there are also 4:3, 3:2, 2:1, 1:1, 1:3.14159 and many others. Simple ratios ...


2

I think of the baseline grid as a framework to build from. You could probably potentially use it for everything but your work will end up looking robotic. For the web, I think it could make sense to use multiples of your baseline grid to create spaces between your elements as you can probably define it as an em or somehow in sass and reuse it. In print, I ...


3

I have a feeling the answer would come down to opinions. In my opinion no, the baseline is for consistent vertical flow. And the grid for layout and logical sections. The two could be integrated. But may create more design issues than they fix. You could have baseline with multiples of 4px and a grid with multiples of 7px, as long as it looks good its ...


3

My understanding and knowledge of grids is quite limited but from what I've learned when it comes to images the upper side should line up with the f-height of the copy and the lower side should line up with the actual baseline. That may be a bit tricky to implement properly on the web but it's worth considering.


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I would use two different stylesheets. One stylesheet for on screen, and another print stylesheet to specify sizing when your page is printed. This way you will be able to adjust your CSS appropriately for various devices, as well as specify inches or centimeters for a printed page. Check out these resources for making a print stylesheet. And for achieving ...


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When you use the client's logo in the header, visitor's instantly know who's site they have arrived at. By placing the second logo in a sidebar, visitor's can see that the site has a "sponsor" or "feature" and not confuse the that logo with your client's logo. Your client is primary even if they are a sponsored target. For example (here ...


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You don't need an arts or design degree to be a good designer. It helps, sure, but it isn't necessary. The most important thing you need instead of a degree is experience. That is exactly the thing that takes you to the next level: work experience. I'd advise you to keep on doing web design work, read about it both offline and on. There's gazilliions of ...


1

Actually this is a known "wontfix" bug with Firefox not fully supporting SVG fonts. Once WOFF2 becomes fully supported, Firefox will render SVG font outlines embedded in an OpenType-flavored WOFF 2 font. At least that's the idea. Learn more here: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=119490


2

First of all, this answer depends completely on what the content of the text and the feel you want to create. From your question, it seems that it's for some type of blog or informational article, but not too technical. My answer will reflect that outlook. For these dense sections should I reduce the width of the content wrapper? Or enlarge the font ...


0

Javascript and jQuery are best because they don't lag web page loading. But they require programming knowledge


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When you say "Improving your dad's website", what do exactly mean by that, do you mean how it visually looks regardless of its UX or do you mean it's UX or even both... To me, both needs improvements; 1) fonts mainly don't match the overall design, somewhere it's too small and other places are too massive, the key is consistency! 2) grammatical problems, ...


1

The problem with most greeked text that resembles real text is that people don't read. In the context of websites, I often find that I need to make it absolutely clear that "Hey, this page still needs real content!" To that extent, I've been using 'Xxxx' text: Xxxxx xxx xx xxxxxx xxx xx x xxxxx xxxx. Xxxxx xx xxxxx xx xxxxxxx xxxxxx xxx x xxx. Xxxx ...


1

Note: I have not tried any of these tools in depth. The closest thing I can find to a full animator for the web is Animatron. It looks like it renders to Canvas, which means it is built on HTML5 and JavaScript. Another similar tool is HTML5Maker. However, if you're just looking to create an online video there are lots of tools including Moovly, GoAnimate, ...


0

Try http://daneden.github.io/animate.css/ and http://mynameismatthieu.com/WOW/ both work together like a charm with text or images and have many numerous effects with delay, scroll activation


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You were exporting at High (300dpi) resolution. On the other hand, "Save for Web" has an automatic resolution of 72dpi. The 300dpi PNG is larger than the 72dpi PNG because the number of pixels in the image has increased, while the print size has remained the same. It's easy to Export an image to PNG with specific pixel dimensions if the target resolution is ...


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Are there are standard dimensions for a coming soon page? No.


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First of all, creating a "coming soon" page might not be a good idea at all. We have a discussion about whether or not they are helpful which I hope you read and consider the arguments. If you still think that you should create a "coming soon" page, then the best practice would not be to design for one particular set of dimensions, but rather to design ...


1

What most people do in this situation is to provide the developers with a pattern library / design library /style guide. This is what I provide the developers at my company with. Its basically a wiki that shows the developer what they need to build out say the navigation for example. It will provide them with all the information they will need to remake ...


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If you don't like doing it on a layer (which sounds fine to me), print it out and mark it up by hand. Somehow you have to indicate an object or call it by name and write a list of characteristics describing it. Whether you do that in the program or on paper is up to you and your developer.


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With RTL language sites, we need to change a fair many things about a LTR site. Assign <html dir="rtl">. For more information on what that does, check this article or look it up. There is also a CSS direction property that changes the text flow of block level elements and text but does not affect the layout of the page. Mirror your layout. This means ...


4

This should be possible somewhat easily if you instruct your web developer accurately. They'll have to give the bar a certain so-called class and include a media query to hide it on smaller screens. for example: html <div class="foo"> <div class="bar-element"> ... </div> <div class="bar-element"> ... ...


0

I answered this over here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4014823/does-a-favicon-have-to-be-32x32-or-16x16/26807004#26807004. The source tells you exactly how to create and implement for all sizes.


1

If it's web design feedback you're after then things like Behance and DeviantArt are ok but they're more geared towards graphics. I'd suggest going onto the Envato forums, probably the themeforest site as the users on there are all people who are selling websites so they're all looking for feedback themselves. http://themeforest.net/forums


3

Since the tiles are shaped in such an irregular way, you can create each them using SVG in Inkscape or Adobe Illustrator and attach a click event to change the selected color. Once you export it from Illustrator or Inkscape it turns into XML which is DOM based, so you can selecte each part using CSS and JavaScript. You can then do the same thing for the ...


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the size that would accomodate just about all screen resolutions would be 2500w x 1600h pixels (34 inches by 22 inches). http://profilerehab.com/twitter-help/background_dimensions


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Use this GRUNT task to generate all possible variants: https://github.com/gleero/grunt-favicons Generates all known types and sizes icons from PNG image. Uses ImageMagick. Input: square logo in png. You can also keep near the source files with resolution prefix e.g. source.16x16.png. Output: favicon.ico (16x16, 32x32, 48x48) — desktop browsers, address ...


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Use their logo in the header and the second logo in a side bar with a link to the organization's site.


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How to do video for pick color using paint in windows 7/8 is available on the below link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LN5wOd6Nw7s


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In this situation you need to think from a user experience standpoint. I think that you need to gather some information for your bosses, show him how this would confuse website visitors. The to further stress your point show them how many secondary logos are often in the footer (things like Norton site security logo, that green safe shopping check mark and ...


0

i'd probably just enlarge the white search-menu bar on top by maybe 1,5-2 times its size and then place both logos overlapping both the bar and the photo by half of their size. Both logos same visual size of course and on top left position. Of course that just works, if your client is ok with reducing the logo size. Hope this helps. Sry for bad english.


0

You'll find that every designer has a different process. I used to be PS or nothing, but now that websites are less photo based and rely more on CSS and SVG's for graphics I've become devoted to Illustrator. I still use PS to edit my photos. Using symbols have become valuable as it saves time in the long run, say you need to make a change to an icon, you can ...


0

You could create divs for the body copy. That way you control the width or make it relative to the screen's size but keeping smaller proportions inside the divs. For every div you create, you could set width, color, span, etc. See this page: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_div.asp


0

Since there is no code to speak on there is no context, the issue can be related to pixel interpolation. Try looking for hinting and you'll get my draft, but the level the software allows you to play with that kind of stuff is not that high in comparison to Fontlab hinting, for example. Snap to Pixel or make the graphic a bit smaller, or choose Optimize for ...


4

Since this is tagged as web-design: Although your purpose for these calendar images is not clear, in order to create this in the most dynamic way, I'd recommend using HTML's little know <time> element (which is supported back to IE9) and CSS as opposed to creating a bunch of variation images because it's much easier to update. Here's a basic ...


1

A quick and dirty way in photoshop would be to open the image in photoshop, go to image/adjustments/hue&saturation, select colorize and then tune the Hue and Saturation sliders. Because you are using a png, you might have to clip out the parts you do not want to be effected and leave those parts a layer above the copy of the image with the parts you need ...


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Personally, it all depends on your skills and requirements. Skills being able to learn and grasp stuff quickly. Requirements being finances. Learning something will need time., and that would kill your productivity for the time being. So if you have a lot of time to kill, go ahead and learn to code. I've been a designer for the last four years and i am ...


2

I work with Chinese-English prints a lot and usually people use separate fonts for Chinese and English. And like Ryan said, if English uses serif fonts, then Chinese uses serif fonts, same for sans-serif. We don't use Chinese font for English text because Chinese font is double byte and often will display latin characters in a monospace manner (unattractive ...


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Mac:"Hiragino Sans GB" win/mac :"Microsoft YaHei","微软雅黑" http://www.lofter.com/


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I think the reality is you can do it either way. I would certainly try to use a font up front that supports English and Chinese, if that failed though I wouldn't lose any sleep over selecting a different font for the Chinese version. Just try to keep the overall feel the same between the two. If you use a simple sans-serif English font then try to find a ...



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