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As CAI suggests, 'price accordingly' and protect yourself from the endless revision cycle. I usually include one or two revisions in the initial quote, and state clearly that extra revisions are charged at an hourly rate. I find this usually forces clients to be more clear in the changes they require, and not drag out the process. If you're talking about ...


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1. Always have a contract The terms you will be working by, including deadlines, the number of included revisions, scope of the project, final deliverables, costs etc. should all be set out in a contract. You should have this contract read, signed and returned, ideally with a deposit, before starting any work. There is a very helpful post about what should ...


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Workflow is the answer. There is an aplication called InCopy for colaborative work. http://www.adobe.com/products/incopy.html That solves the text issue. For Photos you can have the photos on one shared hard drive, and you can just replace the file with other with the same name. But be aware that people that do not know Graphic design makes, sometimes, ...


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I've come across this countless amounts of times. And whilst it would be nice to be able to stick just to clients who understand your work, life isn't like that. If it's a brochure that requires printing externally, then point out that it would need crop and bleed, and that the file definitely needs to be done in InDesign. However, if it's for a publication ...


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This is like "hei, can i please drive your car? oh by the way i dont have a drivers licence and never driven before" :) Experienced clients will not ask for this. They will know its generally impossible to edit inhouse without the actual software installed, or the knowledge of using it. A client who has had brochures made by other providers in the past will ...


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Not really. You can circumvent the problem in several ways. Use a software she can use. Usually this means to use MS Word, with all pains that come with this, or better yet PowerPoint. Or use something esle like webpage. Use a software that overlays on the PDF like PDF mail merge (thanks @hsawires). This might work better. Off course you lose the ...


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One workaround which makes it possible to trace a low-res image on top of a high-res in Gimp or Photoshop goes like this (example in Gimp): Open the desired original image. Resize the canvas to a square with the same width and height as the largest dimension of the image. E g if the original image is 800×600, make the canvas 800×800. Create a new ...


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I would look into developing your complex design as vector in Illustrator: Create the line with the Line Segment Tool: Go to Object -> Expand: Review the options in the panel: After ok you should be able to adjust the fill or even apply an outline: When expanding the lines they will adjust in size if you adjust the artboard in Illustrator. ...



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