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Dec
5
comment Adobe Illustrator pixel to mm formula?
I think part of the problem is that svg files do in fact allow one to specify pixels. This clouds the issue. In many examples, one sets the viewport size to pixel dimensions (usually for the web-based applications), and then uses dimensionless values for the objects and primitives. Set the pasteboard or document to the dimensions and units which you desire the printed product to be, Place... the SVG file, and then scale it to fit the pasteboard.
Dec
5
comment Does CorelDraw have a native read resolution for reading SVG's?
can you tell us what equipment you are using for these stickers? I am still struggling to understand why you need to convert the svg to anything pixel-based in the first place.
Dec
5
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
I was actually suggesting something a lot simpler: "this is a square, if it does not look square on your monitor, you have a problem!" :)
Dec
4
comment Measurements and units in svg-edit
When dealing with magazines, they provide me with a spec. which I must follow so that artwork matches requirements. It is offset press and they know the trim size of the magazine so dpi follows from that specification. For instance: the plates might be 150 line screens, which dictates a sampling rate of about 2x to avoid moire patterns, so 300dpi images are desirable. What are the production limitations for the creation and cutting of a project sticker? Are you using a particular piece of equipment? What are the largest and smallest sizes which can be created on your equipment?
Dec
4
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
note that the bit about 96 dpi assumption in corel draw is *probably because they need a value of some sort for embedding raster textures etc.
Dec
4
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
If you have ever had to manually graph a solution in algebra or calculus by hand with pen and paper, you probably did so with fewer points than you would if you had a graphing calculator. This is, in a simplistic way what vector images are doing: with pen and paper, you had a very low-dpi renderer and the calculator was a higher dpi, but in both cases the "image of the graph" was stored as a function.
Dec
4
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
raster images have the resolution (number of pixels [the dots in DPI]) fixed at creation time, where PURE vector images have their resolution undefined until they are rendered to an output device (printer or screen). I say "pure" because one can have raster texture fills etc. embedded within the vector art. The vector will remain scalable, but the raster portions will degrade in quality if scaled significantly from their creation size.
Dec
4
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
@TehMacDawg: DPI is a derived measurement which requires dots AND inches to calculate. Raster images deal in dots (pixels) only. Pixels are basically a logical unit immutable in size (think of the classical atom). The exact same 100px square image WITHOUT editing or altering the image file can be printed at .33 inches (300 dpi) or 100 inches (1 dpi)
Dec
4
comment Pixels in Vectors - SVG
Pure vector images are UNIT independent which is deeper than "DPI independent." You ask whether DPI varies on the client side, but ask yourself: is a 1280x720 pixel image the same physical size on a 50 inch monitor and a 20 inch monitor?
Dec
4
answered Pixels in Vectors - SVG
Dec
4
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is that flash can do but css3 cant do
Dec
4
answered save .png to correct size in Photoshop for print
Nov
30
comment Losing Details when reducing to smaller image
@HariharanAnbazhagan: It is probably better in most cases to save the source files and re-export the different sizes from the source file rather than resizing a png.
Nov
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Losing Details when reducing to smaller image
Nov
30
comment CMYK JPEGs extracted from PDF appear inverted
I haven't missed the point at all. You still haven't provided any info on what tool you are using to extract the images, nor whether the images as a group are fixed (already extracted), you haven't provided any information about whether you can go back to the PDFs to re-extract, and you haven't specified whether you even need the end result to be JFIF. I've mentioned a few things which might cause problems, such as outdated or incomplete libraries, etc. The docs you cite are from the 90s and speak of Photoshop 3 in the future tense. A sample image might be helpful as well.
Nov
29
comment Beginning with drawing
It is important for a new artist to enjoy the experience, but even more important to fail to see anything they produce as "mistakes" at all. Mistakes are a failure of the product to live up to one's hopes and expectations, so be as loose as possible with what you want.
Nov
29
comment Beginning with drawing
I agree that photo reference is different than the in-person approach, but the ability to see an object from all angles is actually an impediment to a new artist. The subtle movement of your eye position as you turn your head and slouch is a direct source measurement error (as is taking comparative measurements with one's pencil but not consistently holding the pencil at the same distance from one's eye)
Nov
29
reviewed Reject suggested edit on
Nov
29
awarded  adobe-photoshop
Nov
28
comment CMYK JPEGs extracted from PDF appear inverted
I am referring to the original JFIF standard which supports 1 or 3 color (24-bit). Lack of CMYK support was rectified in a later standard. It used to be a problem when people would create jpegs from CMYK sources and try and use them on web sites. As far as workflow, you objected to e100's suggestion of using batch automation. Photoshop supports this. If the colors are simply inverted, then Photoshop can run a batch process such as "open, invert, save as" on an arbitrary number of files.