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Sep
8
awarded  Revival
Sep
6
revised I select colour #0033ff and get colour #3d58a7 in a CMYK Photoshop file. What could be happening?
added 24 characters in body
Sep
6
answered I select colour #0033ff and get colour #3d58a7 in a CMYK Photoshop file. What could be happening?
Sep
6
answered How to avoid pixel shifting for embossed tiling in Gimp
Sep
5
answered How do I select multiple paths in inkscape?
Sep
4
revised What font is used in this banner?
added 2 characters in body
Sep
4
comment What font is used in this banner?
Here's a normal size and enhanced version for use with whatthefont. Using this I was able to determine that it was Lucida Sans.
Sep
4
revised What font is used in this banner?
deleted 2 characters in body
Sep
4
answered What font is used in this banner?
Sep
4
comment Free alternatives to Impact
Oswald appears to be another revival of the same typeface as League Gothic, but in a less finished state (some of the stroke widths are uneven and non-symmetical, see "g", "s", "$", and "&"). In fact that uneven "s" is quite bad - once you've seen it, you can't un-see it.
Sep
3
revised What are the fonts used for this WWII Jolly Roger sign?
deleted 18 characters in body
Sep
2
comment Helvetica Neue Equivalent on Google Fonts?
Roboto is probably the best equivalent of Helvetica Neue on Google Fonts. It's also very professionally designed, having been commissioned by Google themselves and used in their Android OS as their answer to iOS's Helvetica Neue.
Sep
2
comment Helvetica Neue Equivalent on Google Fonts?
Why is this non-answer the accepted answer? It not only doesn't answer the question, but it's wrong in claiming that nothing else is like Helvetica. Helvetica is one of many humanist sans typefaces, notable examples including Univers and Arial, and it's also not the only one to derive from Akzidenz-Grotesk.
Sep
2
answered Free alternatives to Impact
Aug
30
comment What are the fonts used for this WWII Jolly Roger sign?
Unfortunately it is unlikely to have been based on a stencil. Skilled sign-writers prided themselves on their hand-lettering ability.
Aug
30
comment What are the fonts used for this WWII Jolly Roger sign?
Hey, Marcel Lasaj's suggestion of Legothic URW for the bottom font is even better than mine.
Aug
29
comment Why all the hate? --Two spaces after the period
We were taught to place two spaces after a full stop in Australia, when learning on typewriters, and IIRC this is something we got from the U.K. As far as I knew this is not a particularly American phenomenon. I was of the understanding at the time that the opposite was true - that the U.S. were the first, and loudest, opponents of the two-spaces practice.
Aug
29
comment what is the largest glyph width in Arial?
Ok, that's weird, I don't get what the point of your comments is. You were the one that brought up accent height, I pointed out you were wrong about it, and yet you criticize me for talking about accent height because it's irrelevant? Also, you were wrong about the widest character being the em dash in Arial, but you are still defending your answer because it may be correct for some other fonts (hint: it usually isn't, and at any rate this question was about Arial). I just don't see what you have to gain from those comments.
Aug
27
comment what is the largest glyph width in Arial?
That's a naive view of typefaces and doesn't apply to modern fonts. In modern fonts it's almost universal for there to be capital letters with accents above them, which are taller than the ascender on the f, and it's commonplace for there to be characters wider than an em space, especially when including things like ligatures and, as pointed out elsewhere, characters like ‱ (per ten thousand sign, nicknamed "basis points" in economics).
Aug
27
comment Lorem ipsum equivalent for Spanish, Polish and other languages?
I'd describe it more as "scrambled" than "truncated". The first sentence "lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..." is a mostly intelligible part of a Latin phrase except it is missing context, but from then on it is mostly jumbled words that aren't intelligible at all, apart from being jumbled from Latin texts.