236 reputation
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location Toronto, Canada
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 14 hours ago
Just another dev hack.

14h
comment Photoshop — How to stop patch tool from smudging nearby pixels as last step? (quick video demo)
No, it's more a matter of "any 'new tool' that merely copies what is already a feature of the program is not really a 'new tool", is it?" There's no reason for the patch tool to duplicate copy & paste.
22h
comment Photoshop — How to stop patch tool from smudging nearby pixels as last step? (quick video demo)
That would make it other than the patch tool. Most of your procedure can be done by making a selection, hitting Command-or-Control J and using the move tool. You are then free to transform and mask as necessary, with much greater freedom than the patch tool offers for that specific type of operation. The patch tool is intended to make things easy that were difficult or impossible without it, not to replace the basic functionality that has been in Ps almost since its inception.
22h
comment How to reduce screenshot dimensions for putting in a macbook mockup?
A Smart Object won't "keep the same quality" on output; it merely prevents you from "committing" any scaling decisions you make while working. The output still needs to be resampled down, and will suffer the same artifacting, etc.
22h
comment How to make food images not so dried out
That's rather old-fashioned nonsense, @Scott. 'Twas true in the Age of Acetate, when there was no immediate feedback (even Paranoids took time to develop; with E6, "chimping" could take several hours) and most photography was done under hot lights. That's not to say that there is no trickery anymore (that bowl of cereal isn't cereal all the way down, the chicken is well undercooked so the skin looks like skin, there's a lot of scaffolding you don't see, etc.), but for the most part it's just plain easier and less expensive to use the real deal these days (and no legal hassles).
22h
comment Creative use, copyright and public domain regarding book cover art
Cover illustrations/photography would belong to the illustrator/photographer (unless done in-house on a work-for-hire basis or grandfathered under the old commissioning rules); the cover as a whole would belong to the publisher (unless the type, etc., was part of the illustration). So there's more than one set of rights in play, and more than one expiration date to consider. That said, something like debossed/foil-stamped text (in a common font, rather than from a bespoke slug) on linen would probably not meet any threshold. But IANAL, and you really need proper advice rather than chatter.
Aug
23
answered What kind of filter / treatment /lighting / style is done on this photo?
Aug
23
comment How to save a picture after cropping in Photoshop CS6?
It might not seem worth mentioning, since we're all more than a little bit familiar with Photoshop, but you have to commit the crop (press Enter or click the tick) before you get out of the crop tool and back to the image.
Jan
14
awarded  Yearling
Jan
12
answered targeted setting of transparency
Mar
7
awarded  Commentator
Mar
7
comment Preparing photographs for black and white photocopiers
Filter→Sketch→Halftone pattern... works pretty okey-dokey on greyscale too; both scanline and dot patterns photocopy well.
Mar
2
comment What is the difference between DPI (dots per inch) and PPI (pixels per inch)?
Printing a 300ppi (print resolution) image on a 1200dpi printer would mean that there are 16 dots of each colour (with a low "depth" for each dot) to represent each of those pixels. While printer/driver systems are pretty good at dithering, that's still a pretty poor gamut. That's why digital printers with more than four ink values (lighter blacks, light cyan, light magenta and often one or more pure colours that would normally be mixed) can print so much better than a $50 1200dpi four-colour all-in-one—each of the dot groups used to print a pixel can represent a much larger range of tones.
Mar
2
comment What is the difference between DPI (dots per inch) and PPI (pixels per inch)?
It's probably worth mentioning as well that each pixel in an image can be any colour in the working colour space, dots (especially in digital printing) are generally far more limited. A 1200 dpi printer can print 1200 dots per inch (usually 1200 dots per inch per colour), but each of those dots is either an on/off or available in a limited number of sizes (usually four or fewer). That means that you need a group of dots taken together to accurately create the appearance of a pixel's colour. (cont'd)
Mar
2
comment How can I achieve metallic gold effect? I need to laser-print golden fonts using an OKI C9650 printer
I'd almost forgotten about that—I used to do double prints (inkjet followed by laser) quite often, either to get that "hit of varnish" look for tone-on-tone or to use a foil (although I tended to use a hot laminator rather than a (waxing) iron). Take some slack.
Mar
1
comment How can I achieve metallic gold effect? I need to laser-print golden fonts using an OKI C9650 printer
but the secret to metallic printing is metal. That can be an ink with something like shell gold in it (in an offset or letterpress print), foil stamping, or a thermal dot-matrix process either using a transfer ribbon or (hyper-expensive) metallized toners.
Jul
28
awarded  Supporter
May
27
comment Paint Shop Pro 7: how to create a new palette from my image?
@E100: The reduction to a color set that can be described in 8 bits (the lookup address) is the reduction in depth we're talking about. You young uns might not remember it, but there was a time when 8 bits was all we had to work with (VGA), and introducing a different pallette would change the display adapter lookup table. In the 24-bit (and higher) world, you can display images with multiple pallettes on the same screen, but it hasn't always been that way. Try going to your display settings and reducing the color depth to 256 colors (if you can) to see the difference.
May
27
comment Inept knowledge about dpi and ppi,please help?
Oh, and the screen frequency is (and always has been) stated as LPI (or simple "xxx-line" in North America, with the "per inch" being assumed) when discussing halftone -- a 200-line screen is extremely fine printing (think coffee table book).
May
27
comment Inept knowledge about dpi and ppi,please help?
@DA01: That's 600 ink dots per inch, not 600 pixels per inch. DPI and PPI, despite what the accepted answer says, are not, and never have been, interchangeable in the printing industry. If the printer is asking for 600 DPI for a billboard, he's asking for a RIP, not an image file, and that RIP is based on a printer output resolution of 600 DPI. And when I said it used to be considered hi-res, 300 DPI was "standard" droplet density -- and giclée printers would make that density look smooth enough for final output for art prints (giclée wasn't always synonymous with inkjet).
May
26
answered Paint Shop Pro 7: how to create a new palette from my image?