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i draw from time to time, just as a stress reliever and a hobby. i'm into very basic sketches, nothing to crazy honestly, but i always shied away from drawing people because i get intimidated. i don't want to commit myself to drawing because i do it for fun, but when it comes to people, I really don't like the proportion lines??? Like the lines that you draw first, and then you draw the person it and then erase it. I just find it very messy and frustrating especially because I'm not serious about drawing. But I would love to simple sketches of people. Has any felt the same way, and if so, any tips?

closed as too broad by Scott, Lucian, xenoid, joojaa, AndrewH Nov 9 '17 at 15:37

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  • Hi ndwndw, Welcome to graphicdesign.stackexchange. Many of us have felt similar frustrations as we began. With more experience, you'll make lighter and fewer guidelines. It'll happen as you continue. Just do what you enjoy and the rest will follow. Have you considered cartooning, caricature, stylized, or otherwise impressionistic people? – Stan Nov 6 '17 at 0:53
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One way to avoid the problem of removing guidelines is to use two sheets of paper, one "underlay" for the rough guidelines and another semi-transparent "overlay" for the final sketch or clean rendering.

Often, I'll set up the illustration "rough" on the underlay and put a piece of tracing paper or parchment "overlay" covering the rough and make the final on the overlay.
I carry some standard underlays such as parallel lines to help with lettering and some complex (and basic) shapes that would be a hassle to draw.

This has two benefits.
The first one is no guidelines to deal with after the sketch is finished—much cleaner.
The second benefit is that there is no limit to the number of different underlays. You might have one underlay detail for the face outline. You might have another detail underlay with a hairline, say. This allows you to use them independently. You can slide the messy worked-on "hairline" into the perfect position before you draw it onto the clean overlay.
Using this technique allows me to work quickly and neatly.

Tip: Use tracing paper or an underlay frame that fits your scanner glass.
Tip: Do what you enjoy your way.

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