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I want to make this logo print-ready on a T-shirt, but I have a few questions:

1) I have an overlap in my logo, I tried to merge the whole artwork but I get conflation artefacts, I also tried the shape builder but the same occurs. I don't want the conflation artefacts and I also know I should't have any overlaps in the logo that will be printed on a T-Shirt. what should I do?

2) I have 5 colors in the logo (white, 2 blacks, 2 grays), I knew from the videos on youtube that I must convert them to spot colors to make a color separation. After that, I check them in the separations preview. I also know that white is not counted as a spot color, is that right? so now I will have only 4 colors as spot.

3) should the black be 0,0,0,100 as a spot color for T-shirt print? what about the other colors should they have a specific values or as soon as I change them to spot it's okay?

4) I will save the file as High quality print PDF and leave the rest as default, is that correct?

5) If the client didn't mention which method he will use for printing the T-Shirt, should I still use spot colors, or I should make other file with Pantone colors so I cover all his needs?

6)if the client will use the sublimation method, is there any difference in saving method or colors?

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    Why can't you have overlapping artwork on a T-shirt? Regular workflows don't need such a specific check. Did you receive specific instructions of the printer not to do this? – usr2564301 Feb 28 '18 at 21:32
  • Thanks so much@usr2564301, so I shouldn't worry about the overlaps ? No I didn't receive any instructions like this. – New_spirit_designs Feb 28 '18 at 21:51
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    Sublimation is an iron on... It's printed to a laser printer, similar to what you would do in your office just with special toner, then heat transferred to the garment. There is no ink.. no press.. no separations.. nothing.. just a printer and a hot pad. This is why knowing the reproduction method may either save a LOT of work.. or cause you to put in far more work. – Scott Feb 28 '18 at 22:43
  • Also.. how is this different than your other question: graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/106103/… – Scott Feb 28 '18 at 22:45
  • it is not @scott, Can I delete it ? – New_spirit_designs Mar 5 '18 at 4:13
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@New_spirit_designs - you really need to look at the specific PSP's (Print Service Provider) published submission guidelines: here are some sublimation printing art submission guidelines from a super-quick web search which are generically similar to your question:

A-E-Mag-art-Sublimation

JakPrints Art Sublimation

Five Ultimate Sublimation Submissions

As you can see, some ask for specific approaches to colour, some just want spots, some require CMYK only, some have pre-existing file templates they require that you download and use as the base for your design effort: it's crucial you query the specific PSP as to their requirements to be sure your print comes out as expected.

IMHO pdf is a good overall general file exchange format, and can be printed from with reasonable success in a lot of PSP shops, but there are also many who will not take a pdf - either they've had poor results with pdf in the past, or they may have different proprietary RIP or imposition software which only takes EPS or AI, so you absolutely need to check with them!

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  • so @GerardFalla if i have a white color in my design, how can it be printed on T-shirt using sublimation method? or should i change the color in my design to something other than white? – New_spirit_designs Mar 5 '18 at 4:13
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    Again, you'd need to talk to the specific PSP and review their specifications, FAQ's and templates page, but... a typical modern sublimation printer is basically using a standard 4-colour model, and so we can presume that your white is produced as lack of toner/ink/medium - but again, you need to check with your PSP. – GerardFalla Mar 6 '18 at 15:45
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In fact, in most printing setups, overprint in overlap areas is desirable to you don't get annoying little halos where ink didn't flow!

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  • Thanks @Gerardfalla so does that mean I should leave the overlaps because they are useful for printing ? – New_spirit_designs Feb 28 '18 at 22:19

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