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Is there a way in PS to resize .jpeg files to a specific file size, like 150mb, by setting the exact file size? When I save a .jpeg, I don't see any way to know what file size PS is savaing or change it on the flow, so currently the only way I can do this is by multiple savings and guesswork what size in pixels 150mp should be, and this process is a huge time waste which I wish to eliminate.

PS I'm on Windows.

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    Asigning file weight as a measure is the worst parameter you can ever use! – Rafael Mar 5 '18 at 0:29
  • I can't have those files larger cause there is a file limit on a site I want to upload them to, but I don't want the quality to drop lower that this requirement. – Evanto Mar 5 '18 at 10:11
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    You didn't say what platform you're on, but for Mac GraphicConverter can do this type of repetitive task. – Tetsujin Mar 5 '18 at 10:39
  • Thank you, but unfortunately I'm on Windows. – Evanto Mar 5 '18 at 11:57
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    Sounds like a job for imagemagic, or graphicsmagic. In general this is a optimisation problem lots of methods for this one. – joojaa Mar 5 '18 at 12:01
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You can automate it using Actions (Record one process and apply it to a folder with your files). Then automatically it will do the job for you to all the files in the given folder. Check this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uqk9ulWMWtI

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  • I know that there are Actions in PS to automate actions, but how to specify file size while saving a .jpg? When I'm saving a .jpg in PS, I don't see any info on the file weight PS saves it with, so the only way I currently have is doing guesswork and multiple savings which is too time consuming. This is the part that I'm trying to figure out before automation. – Evanto Mar 5 '18 at 10:22
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if you have images which are all in one format by format I mean same resolution and same size then you can write a save as action and then batch the whole folder with the batch option in photoshop select the action you had recorded and then set the output folder and you will be done. Please refer to some tutorials on how to use actions and batch option in photoshop.

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  • They are of different sizes (resolution is the same though). – Evanto Mar 5 '18 at 13:41
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You can use Save for web.

There you can see and change settings to see the file size.

See the image below:

enter image description here

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  • Quite technically, savefor web does just what he does not want to do, saves the file and shows the result. The way im reading the question is that OP wants some kind fo gradient descent to the solution – joojaa Mar 5 '18 at 12:00
  • Just tested this out, but it doesn't seem to work for large files. It is extremely slow when I just switch file format to jpeg in this window, and when I try to change the quality, it stops working with an error "The optimized image could not be generated, likely because it is too big and there is insufficient memory. The image will not be displayed.". Seems that "for web" implies some small files, while my files range in 150-250 mb. I'll try to play around it by giving PS more memory, but seems that chance are small. Thank you for an idea anyway. – Evanto Mar 5 '18 at 13:53
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Save For Web has an Optimize to File Size option. It does have limits especially if you don't let it pick between Gif and Jpg. Say taking a 6000x6000 photo and wanting it to be 50kb isn't going to work.

enter image description here

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  • In the "Optimize to File Size" popup the Desired Fle Size is in K (I guess it's kylobites), this is weird to convert Mbs to Kbs first to set this. Also "a value between 0 and 2048 is required", so I can't set a size that I need. Thank you for an idea anyway! – Evanto Mar 6 '18 at 10:16

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