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I know how to follow flyer and poster design tutorials to learn new design effects, and I know how to sketch a layout. But when I’m working on a comp for a client, I often struggle with creating a design style that is relevant to what the client is looking for. So I feel that my biggest problem is not knowing how to create a design style that aesthetically communicates the style "the client" is looking for.

How do you decide which design effects and design elements to use when working on an ad design? Or do you freestyle your design and hope that the client likes it (Like I’ve been doing)?

closed as too broad by Billy Kerr, Westside, Scott, Zach Saucier, WELZ Apr 2 '18 at 5:23

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  • Good Communication with the client
  • Understanding marketing psychology
  • Experience
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Communicate with your client to understand what they need and more importantly, what your design needs to do in order to service them. Form follows function.

Whatever style you create should be the result of various decisions you make to solve problems that the client is presenting you with based on their needs. Who is the target market and how do you want them to perceive you? What is the background of the product or service and how is your "style" relevant to the competition? Will your client be served best by standing out or fitting in to a niche? Does your design "do" anything, like inform, inspire or persuade? These are the sort of things you should be asking yourself to get started with figuring out which way to go with how you want to present your client.

From there it's a matter of creativity and inspiration. If you fly by the seat of your pants hoping for things to go right, I can guarantee that you will eventually burn more than a few bridges.

Side note: Don't make your entire work just an attempt to please your client and don't get pushed around. Your work should be solving problems, first and foremost, it's what you're payed for.

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Well, I try to show a few types of flyer design to my client, I ask about colors and typography and then I just create something with that in mind. I am just a beginner, so this is the way I'm doing my start point.

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    Clients are not designers and should never be dictating colors and typography in my opinion. – Scott Apr 2 '18 at 2:05
  • @Scott never is a strong word, but I agree with the sentiment – Zach Saucier Apr 2 '18 at 4:34

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