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If I have a series of graphics that will be printed on vinyl as a set (1 main image about 5" x 8", 3 graphics about 1" by 2" and 2 graphics about 2" x 3").

Do I send these all to a printer on the same page and add a bleed to the single 8x11" page?

I had thought a bleed meant an extra amount on the border of each image so that when each image is kiss cut, the image will be the exact size I wanted after being cut. But, it appears bleed references a graphic larger than a particular page.

I'm confused as I've never done this before and am supposed to add a 1/4 bleed to all vector images but don't know where to add the bleed.

When I have added a bleed, I get marks on the page. How can I tell that a 1/4" has actually been added?

FYI I am using the latest version of Inkscape.

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If the background is the same as the canvas and the image "floats" within the active print area, all you need is crop (trim) marks to indicate the intended position of the artwork within the live printing area.

There is no need to extend bleed of a neutral background. The bleed area is not necessary in the slug area of the artwork.

Failure to indicate position with trim marks allows unwanted variation and difficulty controlling the precise size and position of your artwork.

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I had thought a bleed meant an extra amount on the border of each image so that when each image is kiss cut, the image will be the exact size I wanted after being cut.

Yes, that is what a bleed is for.

add a bleed to the single 8x11" page

No. In your case, it has no sense to bleed a white piece of paper.

it appears bleed references a graphic larger than a particular page.

Because it assumes that what you need is a particular page that needs bleed, If you do not need it you do not use it.

A normal report, for example, printed on an office laser printer do not need bleed.

But a magazine with photos that are full page needs it. So you add the bleed over the final size. You probably do not need to bleed all 4 sides, only the top, bottom and external sides.

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