-1

I was contacted to make a logo for a friend of a friend. I have made logos before, but usually it's been casual with people I know. This is my first time receiving a contract from a client. It's not very long (an NDA, 6 page ICA, 2 page statement of work), but more than I was expecting. I'm not very good with legal jargon, so I'm very anxious about it! What are some red flags I should look out for? Also, is it normal to include that they can terminate the contract and not pay for any work that is "reasonably unsatisfactory"?

Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated!


Edit:

Things things that stuck out: - They put a time frame of 3 days between each edit/revision - 30 days for them to pay me (is that normal?), did not include 50% upfront - the contract recommends I get business liability insurance. This is a side job for me, so that seems silly for one gig. - contract says unused edits will "roll over to the immediately subsequent work product Company commissions of Contractor" (i'm not entirely sure what this means) - can terminate the contract and not pay for any work that is "reasonably unsatisfactory" (not sure if that is normal)

closed as too broad by Scott, WELZ, Zach Saucier, Luciano, Paolo Gibellini May 1 '18 at 22:19

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Is there anything that particularly sticks out as concerning to you? – WELZ Apr 29 '18 at 21:22
  • As it is the question could be considered too broad. – WELZ Apr 29 '18 at 21:22
  • Yes there are things that stick out: - They put a time frame of 3 days between each edit/revision - 30 days for them to pay me (is that normal?), did not include 50% upfront - the contract recommends I get business liability insurance. This is a side job for me, so that seems silly for one gig. - contract says unused edits will "roll over to the immediately subsequent work product Company commissions of Contractor" (i'm not entirely sure what this means) - can terminate the contract and not pay for any work that is "reasonably unsatisfactory" (not sure if that is normal) – Deeply Apr 30 '18 at 0:16
  • You should probably suggest that they use a standard contract in the business, not one of their own. Search for a local graphics design organisations for one. Also remember the more they demand from you contractually the more you need to ask money. Note you need to have a clause in the contract that says loser of court proceeding pays for the legal. So if they invoke unsatisfactory they need to show that in court. Also offcourse if they do so they get nothing. – joojaa Apr 30 '18 at 4:55
1

Contracts are an agreement between parties.

If you don't agree to something, you are free to ask for a contract revision.

If you can't come to an agreement on something, then a contract is not wise to enter into.

0

It depends on the job. Business liability insurance is something that many people ask for, because if there is some problem with the work you have done (e.g., you create a logo that accidentally looks like someone else's, and that third party sues your client), they need to know that you can handle it. The terms that they have given are relatively common, but that doesn't mean you have to sign if you are uncomfortable with them. They are absolutely weighted to be in favour of the client and not you as the designer. You can shrug and deal with that if you think it's unlikely to be a problem, but it might be wiser to honestly ask yourself if they have any reason to reject your work on quality (look at their websites, output etc., and compare to your own work and experience). You can suggest changes to the contract if you are concerned, for example no more than 2 major revisions to the logo, and no more than 5 minor ones. This will protect you from them asking for countless revisions then refusing to pay you. Good communication will help you, though -- e.g., being clear about what they want, when, and whether it is feasible for you to deliver it.

tl;dr -- this is not abnormal but you'd still be wise to tread carefully and consider ways to protect your own interests just as they are protecting theirs.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.