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I've never been great at laying out text and other elements within a rectangle. I know a few tricks (like the rule of thirds) but I'm still unsure. Does the layout below look okay? The rectangle has to be that shape; it's the back of a product (named "brush rest").

enter image description here

  • Looks fine to me. My only suggestion would be to bump everything up slightly so the white space at the bottom is just a little larger than the white space at the top. This will help ground the entire composition visually. – zeethreepio Jun 14 '18 at 15:52
  • Can you add more information? What is the goal of the layout? How will it be used? – curious Jun 14 '18 at 15:53
  • Looks good to me. I would only shift "Please recycle" down a little. – LeoNas Jun 14 '18 at 16:18
  • @Emilie Thanks for asking. I wish I could say more, but it's a new product (in a new category!) and I don't want anyone to make a competing product before my sales team lands at least one big account. It's a B2B product, not a consumer product, so there won't be a marketing campaign - just direct sales. – CreatedByBrett Jun 14 '18 at 17:34
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The composition can use some offset, hierarchy and emphasis.

It's been asserted on here that pure center justified text should never be used because it's too balanced, stationary and non-dynamic.

While the hierarchy is set with vertical layout and read in the order you want, all lines of information are given equal emphasis.

This style can work in a utilitarian, industrial sense, but if this is the main branded face of the product than it can use some tricks to look more commercial.

If this is the primary view of the product than a hierarchy might be set up like this:

  1. Company Logo Mark
  2. Recycling Mark
  3. Patent Mark

Make the logo big, heavy and primary. Try it to either side or centered, near the top.

This is a case where you might want a vertical version of your logo, with symbol over company name, to fit the vertical format.

Recycling mark and patent pending, plus any certification or compliance marks, are usually shown very de-emphasized, small and to the corner bottoms.

The objective in placing the marks, it appears to me, is to give them the minimum space and importance to satisfy the legal requirements.

In any case your example recycling mark appears too heavy, nothing should be more weighted than the company logo.

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  • Great advice. The three things you mentioned have always been challenging for me. But I've been fiddling with the logo: I made the company logo mark larger and used the symbol over the company name, and reduced the size of the recycling logo. It's significantly better! – CreatedByBrett Jun 14 '18 at 18:56
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Move the "US Patent Pending" down as that is presumably not linked with the recycle icon and might be better to separate it from the text+icon recycle block.

Another option, if that makes sense with your packaging, is to rotate the canvas, then play with either left or centered alignment.

Either way as I see it, the "US Patent Pending" needs to separate better.

enter image description here

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