2

I am just starting out in type design and I am trying to learn as much as I can. I am trying to learn best practices so I do not develop bad habits. I have seen the PANOSE system mentioned in a few places and have looked through the reference documents that I could readily find here and here. But given the age of the documents I do not know if the system is still in use, or if it even was ever "best practices".

Should I classify my typeface using the PANOSE system or ignore it?

What are the benefits of using the system?

Is PANOSE 2.0 the most current version?

  • i would like an answer from someone that designs type for a living or did and has at least heard of the PANOSE system before reading this question. assuming i have a working knowledge of the fundamentals and background of type design already, when i apply those going forward to design a typeface, should i classify it according to PANOSE? – brnnnrsmssn Jul 2 '18 at 18:52
0

One of the main uses of Panose classifications (and possibly one of the only practical day-to-day uses) is to allow the font subsystem on, say, Windows to choose a substitute font when an application/document requests a font that isn't installed on the system.

The OS is going to substitute SOME font for the missing one no matter what; providing a meaningful Panose value for your fonts would at least give it a fighting chance of choosing a not-totally-awful substitute, assuming one is available.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.