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I've been rather obsessed with the new Wes Anderson movie, Isle of Dogs. More specifically, I've really enjoyed looking at all the work that's gone into the design of it; everything from the posters to the set designs themselves.

I was trawling through google images the other day trying to find a specific poster that I'd seen in the movie (which I did eventually find) and then came across this picture:

enter image description here

There are a number of things I like about this poster. However, one of the things that has really frustrated me is trying to work out which Mockup design was used to give the poster this sort of old "folded up then unfolded" look. Ive been searching through my favorite mockup site www.mockupworld.co and have been unable to find one even similar to this. Does anyone know where I could find a mockup that would give a similar effect?

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    Pretty sure they didn't use a mockup and pretty sure you don't need one either. Find a photo of a crumpled and folded paper then put it on top of everything on a new layer with blend mode: Multiply. – Joonas Jul 7 '18 at 12:20
  • Google: "vintage folded poster mockup", but @Joonas option is the best to follow – Danielillo Jul 7 '18 at 12:21
  • @Joonas Thanks for your reply, I hadn't thought of that but it makes perfect sense, thank you so much! – Tom Jul 7 '18 at 12:54
  • @Danielillo I've followed what Joonas said and it works perfectly but I'll still do a little search to see if there's one I like:) – Tom Jul 7 '18 at 12:55
  • You can fold a sheet and scan it. – LeoNas Jul 7 '18 at 18:41
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Have a grayscale image of a paper or canvas, which has been folded, compressed to make some folding deformations permanent and then unfolded. You can use it to modulate the brightness of your illustration with layer blending modes. Several layer blending modes are usable. For example multiply or hard light.

enter image description here

A piece of your image is copied and desaturated. It has been put over a drawing which has 2 solid colors. Blending mode = multiply. White in the copy means = no effect, black means make black.

Displacement map can distort plausibly the illustration at the foldings. Direct lines over a heavy bump can seem a little artificial.

Here is the copied texture used as displacement map (Filters > Distort > Displace) to my drawing. The dialog:

enter image description here

The result:

enter image description here

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