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In Adobe Indesign CC 2018 (v 13.1) I am unable to set the ppi resolution. I've tried creating new documents, but there is no field to input ppi. (1) I have also tried editing and defining new Document Presets, which the settings show as 72 ppi (2) but offer no way to modify it. (3)

How do I setup my entire document to be 300 ppi? Thank you!

EDIT: Attached is a new image (4) showing the difference between a Photoshop document and an InDesign document. Both are 6.13" by 9.25". Photoshop's PPI is set at 300. InDesigns is not set at all, as there is no place for it. Clearly the InDesign file is not properly formatted for high definition print.

1: No PPI input

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2: Settings say 72 PPI

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3: No way to modify PPI setting

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  1. Photoshop vs InDesign, same document dimensions

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  • Unrelated, I'm just curious, are you using a 4k monitor? – WELZ Aug 15 '18 at 18:15
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InDesign documents doesn't have a global ppi setting.

(I have noticed the PPI: 72 setting in Document Presets. I can't tell you what it means, but it is not something you should worry about - it has no influence on the resolution or quality of your document.)

InDesign is a vector based application. Everything is basically either vector graphics (text and geometrical shapes) or placed raster images.

Vector graphics are inherently without resolution and the placed images have their own separate resolution depending on which physical size you give them in your document. The pixels of each image don't follow the same pixel grid. If images are rotated, their pixels will even be rotated - unlike Photoshop.

You can check out the Effective ppi of each image in the Links panel or you can set up your Info panel to show the effective ppi of a selected image.

When you export a PDF, to reduce file size, you can choose to downsample every image above a certain ppi to a certain ppi, but no images will be upscaled to this ppi.

An exported PDF will often have images in multiple resolutions and can't be said to have a resolution itself.

In your example, you have created a Photoshop document which is 6.13" by 9.25" at 300 ppi and you place it in a 6.13" by 9.25" InDesign document (no ppi!). Then you would expect the image to cover the entire page when the image is scaled to 100%. The effective ppi of the image would be 300.

If the size stays at 6.13" by 9.25" the image would cover the page no matter which resolution you choose in Photoshop, but the effective ppi in InDesign would of course change accordingly.

It seems to bother you that 100% zoom in InDesign differs from 100% zoom in Photoshop, but it's two different things. InDesign tries to show the correct physical size of your document (on my screen I have to zoom to 93% to get the correct size though). Photoshop displays the pixels of the image 1:1 on the monitor.

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I have the same frustrating issue. I use InDesign for creating print graphics and then some clients want the elements on their website.

In CS6 you could copy graphics and images out of InDesign, open a new file in Photoshop and paste. The new document would be original size at 300ppi.

I'm not sure what changed but I cannot find a way to do this using CC. My current workaround is to scale the graphic (with effects) in InDesign up to 1000% before copying.

Then I follow my traditional steps in Photoshop of the new file, paste, resize, export, save for web as jpeg or png depending on the need.

Hope this helps!

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Indesign will use the PPI of the images, so you do not set it up.

If you want to export to a pdf then is when you set up the PPI for the exported pdf.


Based on your edited question...

There are a loooot of factors to assume you are seeing an image at the desired dimension.

  • When you see an image in Photoshop at 100% scale you are not seeing it at a print scale but a 1:1 image pixel to monitor pixel.

  • An image of 6 PPI will show exactly the same as one image at 600 PPI.

  • Photoshop is a bit dumb in simulating real size on a screen. It does not take account of the real dimension of the monitor as far as I know.

  • When you see an image at Indesign at "real size" it first needs to simulate the document at rea size, calculating the pixel density and real dimensions of your monitor, and then show the scaled image proportional to that regardless the PPI of the image inside.

  • In my opinion, InDesign does a better simulation on the screen of the real size of a document.

  • Rafael, I edited my post to demonstrate that the resolution on the InDesign document is not correct by comparing it to a Photoshop document. They are both the same size, however Photoshop has the PPI set at 300. I have toiled with the PDF export settings for hours without any different results. Also, if there is no PPI setup, why does the InDesign document preset say 72 PPI? (bottom of image #2) – heeya Aug 15 '18 at 17:39
  • I added some bullets. – Rafael Aug 15 '18 at 18:04

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