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My logo is composed only of vector lines. Its dimensions are 1051 x 194.

When I Layer > Transform > Scale the logo to a smaller size (eg 170 x 32), some of the lines disappear; in particular the vertical lines.

Why is this happening and how can I prevent it? Seems like such a basic thing that Sketch should be able to handle!

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Billy Kerr was right. Vectors disappear if it's too small.

It's better to convert vector lines to vector shapes using "Layer -> Convert to Outlines" to gain more flexibility and understand what's happening with the shape.

Sketch app's minimum size to render vector shapes is 0.5 pixel. Sketch's vector shape's width/height must be greater than 0.5 to render in display canvas.

Sketch scale option doesn't show the error message if you reduce the size of a shape lower than 0.5 pixel since some people use it to hide shape. It shows error message only if you manually edit the width/height of a shape

enter image description here

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Vector images are still dependent on rendering on a screen for display purposes, and these screens are made of pixels.

If the lines are too thin when scaled (like much less than a pixel on a monitor/screen), then that's probably why they are disappearing. Try increasing the stroke width before rescaling, or redesign the logo so it looks good at small or large sizes.

The same thing happens in other vector software, and so it's not Sketch specific.

This animation shows what happens in Inkscape (another vector image editor), and how when zooming in the lines are still there.

enter image description here

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    As a point of note, even when looking at the animation above, the vector lines kind of remain until the image is way to small. That's down to anti-aliasing. Notice how the borders of the box change from the solid black through various shades of grey. Anti-aliasing depends on a number of factors (including your graphics card, drivers and software), and can be indirectly affected by other aspects of the kit you (or any other viewer) are using, such as the quality of the output medium (e.g. the monitor). – Paul Sep 13 '18 at 8:39
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    Thank you very much for your answer Billy Kerr, really appreciate you putting the effort in to answer it in a comprehensive manner. Thanks also @Paul for clarification. I selected Suresh Murali's answer as his helped me to solve my problem, though thanks to all of you for your time in answering my question! – pho_pho Sep 13 '18 at 14:18

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