2

I am creating this graphic in Illustrator and InDesign. It is using an outer glow with the same magenta color as the fill of the shape. Normal blend mode 100% opacity.

I would like to get a similar glow result in CMYK as I get in the RGB version. I do know there are significant differences in the RGB and CMYK color spaces.

Still I was hoping there might be some tricks to achieve a less white glow.

Color values:

RGB: #e40045 on #303c49

CMYK: 0/100/60/0 on 63/32/14/76

enter image description here

enter image description here

  • 2
    Hi. It is unclear whether you're creating the effect in Illustrator or in Indesign. In case you did it in Indesign, you can change Transparency Blend Space to RGB: Edit > Transparency Blend Space. Be aware this will affect the whole document though. – Vinny Oct 22 '18 at 6:51
  • Thanks for this tip. I will try this and have a look at the printer’s results. – Lars Oct 22 '18 at 10:37
  • 1
    Thanks again. The trick with Blend Space was a good solution! – Lars Oct 23 '18 at 15:04
0

A solution could be using a rich black and a fake rich magenta in a blend behind the magenta shape:

Blend

blend

Top Shape

Top shape

Result

Glow

Add after the question edit

It's obvious that if you want to get a good result you must create another color since the colors you are using have very different proportions of CYAN and BLACK; and knowing that none of the blending modes offers a good result.

One approach is to create blends between the base colors to their own light, 20% ink and blends of the resulting colors. This is to get a color that has the intermediate proportions of the absent CYAN and BLACK inks.

blends

Using the resulting color highlighted in the previous image, 47/49/26/57 we get a cyan and black percentage. Increasing the magenta to bring it closer to the top shape color and reducing the cyan:

  • From 47/49/26/57 to 30/75/26/60

The result is:

enter image description here

  • Thank you for the suggestion. Unfortunately I did’t clarify enough: the color values I used are specific brand colors. I can’t change them that much. They are defined as the following: RGB: #e40045 on #303c49 CMYK: 0/100/60/0 on 63/32/14/76 – Lars Oct 22 '18 at 10:40
  • I was able to recreate the blends and got the same color value “47/49/26/57”. It is also clear to me why you increased the magenta. The only thing I am missing right now is how you apply the new color. If I create a shape with a 0/100/60/0 fill and the outer glow set to 30/75/26/60 and place it on the blue background it doesn’t look like your screenshot. It’s quite dull. Are you creating some additional squares underneath? – Lars Oct 22 '18 at 13:55
  • I didn't use the outer glow. It's the blend from the blue to the new color and the magenta shape over, like the first part of the question. – Danielillo Oct 22 '18 at 14:14
  • Thanks again. I got it to work and the printing result is satisfying. But for this projects the option described below my question by @Vinny was more suitable. – Lars Oct 23 '18 at 15:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.