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So I made this with the help of another image enter image description here As you can see the letters have a kind of 'shine'. (I do not know what to call it) I know where to put this shine on very few letters taken from the helping image. Could I get a complete sheet with all letters, or perhaps an intuitive way to know where to put them?

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These are usually called "highlights". Highlights show where light hits a reflective surface. The positioning of the highlight is usually on surfaces which face the light source. In the case of the example you posted, to be honest, the effect is not very convincing.

Anyway, here's a diagram which might help. Also, it might help if you think of the letters as being made from rounded plastic 3D tubes rather than flat letters.

enter image description here

  • I assumed the light source would be on the top left. Regardless this is really hard for me to visualize. I kind of wanted a cheat sheet essentially Like for instance how does the 'o' get a highlight on its bottom left? – Anonymous Jan 3 at 9:25
  • That's why I drew a diagram so that it could be visualised. Doesn't it help? Sorry, but I'm not going to do a whole alphabet for you. It's really not fair to ask for complete designs here. The idea of GDSE is to help you, not to do the work for you. – Billy Kerr Jan 3 at 9:31
  • It does help. But I still have doubts. I figured you might know such a sheet. I didn't expect to make a whole new one. Thanks anyways :) – Anonymous Jan 3 at 9:34
  • @Anonymous Don't we all have doubts? Nobody is perfect! Your own judgement is as good as anyone's. You do not have create designs to some predefined exactness. There is no right and wrong here. As long as you think it looks good, and the highlights are convincing enough, then it should be effective. I think if you use your own judgement, it's almost a given that you will make a better job of it than the example you posted, which I feel is quite ineffective. – Billy Kerr Jan 3 at 9:51
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You can find some pretty decent results if you search for 'letter highlighting' in Google images. Also, applying the bevel effect in photoshop can give you a pretty intuitive idea of where the lights and shadows will fall, this usually works for me.

If all else fails, you can find quite a few fonts with the 'highlight', '3D' or 'shiny' keywords being used. You can find one you like and use the font file for reference. I understand why light and reflections are hard but with some practice, they become almost second nature, especially shadows. Good luck!

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