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enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description hereI have been trying to figure out the typefaces or stencils styles that were used for this 1941 map. I was thinking that it could be something like a Leroy Lettering template, but I can't find it. This appears to be handwritten, but also based on some type of actual lettering. Thanks.

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    There's a great possibility in 1941 it was hand lettered and has no direct basis in a known typeface. The "construction" baselines can still be seen (faintly) in some places (aka WOODBINE). – Scott Feb 20 at 19:23
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    All by hand in my opinion. Check the descenders on the "y". They differ. – mayersdesign Feb 20 at 19:24
  • Thanks. So this could have all been done by hand including the numbers? If I want to replicate it, should I just use a Wacom table to trace? – Bradley Huff Feb 20 at 19:32
  • @BradleyHuff The maps are most definitely printed, probably offset which can account for the slight variations in the letters. Printers weren't that accurate back then and would have some variance in consistency. – Ovaryraptor Feb 20 at 20:15
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This is standard architectural lettering for the period. I was trained in lettering when I learned manual draughting years ago: first, you draw baseline and topline construction lines, using either a rolling ruler or an architectural fixed rule on a draughting desk; you faintly line all the letters in pencil, often looking at a printed firmwide lettering standard (with construction lines) as you do it; if there are angled cross strokes (the e's) you sketch an angled line with your fixed architectural rule set to that new angle for each penciled-in "e". Once you're approved, you carefully ink.

When inking, you rest the bottom of your hand on a dowel suspended just above the paper height to avoid contact smudges, wrinkling of the paper from hand pressure, or skin oil transfer to the paper in process. Once the inking has all dried, you use a soft gomme eraser and remove all construction lines - if you have an area with delicate rub-on dot screens applied, where erasure of the construction lines may cause damage, you leave them - this is why construction lines are drawn very delicately.

Here is a decent list of 23 roughly lettering-like fonts... I'll leave it to you to find one you like. I can tell you there used to be two fonts available on Windows called "city blueprint" and "country blueprint" that were pretty good - but that was a long and hoary time ago. Your example's uppercase "E" cearly was influenced by either Frank Lloyd Wright's lettering style or the Sullivan lettering style he himself learned from.

https://blog.miragestudio7.com/architecture-fonts-download-free-architect-handwriting-font/3339/

Good luck and I hope this helps!

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There are several differences in the characters that show that it's handmade:

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There are also many similar fonts very easy to find like Halsvorsen Pro

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It's made with a flat square pen:

pens

In Illustrator you can achieve a similar result with a custom Art brush:

brush

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  • Thanks! I'm curious how something like this would have been done. Would they use a ruler as a guide? – Bradley Huff Feb 20 at 19:48
  • Answer updated. – Danielillo Feb 20 at 20:10
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    Thanks for all of your help. I found that the map was made or printed by E. Hence & Co. out of New York. After looking up some of their other maps, I came across this one that appears to have the same lettering as my map. collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/agdm/id/315 You can zoom in really close on the text. – Bradley Huff Feb 20 at 20:14
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    This is standard architectural lettering for the period. I was trained in lettering when I learned manual draughting years ago: first, you draw baseline and topline construction lines, using either a rolling ruler or an architectural fixed rule on a draughting desk; you faintly line all the letters in pencil, often looking at a printed firmwide lettering standard (with construction lines) as you do it; if there are angled cross strokes (the e's) you sketch an angled line with your fixed architectural rule set to that new angle for each penciled-in "e". Once you're approved, you carefully ink. – GerardFalla Feb 20 at 20:27
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    @GerardFalla That's some nice information you have there. You should consider moving these comments to an answer :) – Ovaryraptor Feb 20 at 20:34

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