1

enter image description here.I want to change all the white pixels into transparent so that I can choose the background of my choice.

I may decide to use a black background, so multiply doesn't work.

2

Use the Background Eraser. Click on a white part of the image and hold down the mouse button - don't release it. Then erase over the entire image.

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Yet another tool I had not encountered in my twenty years of Photoshop use! haha – mayersdesign Jun 21 '19 at 11:18
  • Amazing tip - one thing to point out is you need to set sampling to 'Once', by default mine was set 'Continuous' which meant it kept deleting foreground too. – James Apr 2 at 8:31
1

Duplicate your image layer, apply curves to the duplicate to invert all white to black and lighten everything else full or nearly white. Do not use tresholding, transition slope makes smoother result and you can tweak the result later to steeper:

enter image description here

If there's now much colors which are far from white, It's a good idea to lighten those colors withe Image adjust > Black and white or > Hue&Saturation.

Copy the result to the clipboard

Insert a layer mask to the original, Alt+click the mask icon in the layers panel to get the mask onscreen, Paste in place the inversion result

Click the image icon, close the inverted copy layer and see the result.

enter image description here

Layer mask accept editing, so you can make the slope steeper, if needed.

I guess you are not especially satisfied with the result. If you insert a new background, you see here and there mixes of white and the remeining colors:

enter image description here

Fix it by brushing green and blue to your image or fill it with a gradient. The layer mask prevents you to fill all. I used here some random colors only to show the principle:

enter image description here

It's still imperfect due the low resolution of the original image. The letters have bad edges. For better results you must have the image in higher resolution or in vector domain.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.