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I’m trying to edit a repeating pattern in Inkscape. I covert the pattern to objects and make my changes (adding some additional company’s), select them all and create pattern from objects.

The resulting pattern appears to have a different boundary extent, so the repeating pattern doesn’t align.

Can I set an extent to the newly created pattern?

EDIT 1:

I'm trying to create swatches of geological symbols to use in a QGIS map. My original data source was here, where some kind person has already converted the FGDC digital cartographic standard to SVG: USGS Inkscape pack instructions

I'd like to alter one of these swatches from this:

before

to this (but nicer - this image just to show the intent):

enter image description here

EDIT 2: I've added an inkscape svg document (xml, download and save as .svg) to pastebin to show what I mean about different boundaries. Ideally, the end result would have the same boundary/mask/extent as the original - in teh same position to preserve the repeating pattern.

I can see in the xml hierarchy where the boundary is applied - I just don't know how to generate it in Inkscape

xml - contents of inkscape svg

  • Hi. Welcome to GDSE. Can you possibly share an image showing the problem or what you are trying to achieve. – Billy Kerr May 31 at 23:08
  • I am having real difficulty opening the svgs. Inkscape is literally grinding to a halt when I try to do anything once the file is open. The files were created using an older version of Inkscape, and I am offered a dialog to convert for the newer version - so I'm not sure if that is the problem. Sorry I can't really be more help to you with this. – Billy Kerr Jun 1 at 16:30
  • You can clip the pattern to the boundary you need. – Moini Jun 1 at 23:27
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    It is indeed difficult. What I ended up doing was: 1. convert the pattern to object; 2. Ungroup its contents and combine all paths into one; 3. use round stroke caps; 4. clip the path to the actual stroke end nodes; 5. clone this thing four times and place the clones like a cross around the original, snapping object corner to object corner; 6. manually adjust the node positions that still don't match now. – Moini Jun 4 at 18:58
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    Result: pastebin.com/t0PzPghw – Moini Jun 4 at 19:02
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It is indeed difficult.

What I ended up doing was:

  1. convert the pattern to object
  2. Ungroup its contents and combine all paths into one
  3. use round stroke caps
  4. clip the path to the actual stroke end nodes
  5. clone this thing four times and place the clones like a cross around the original, snapping object corner to object corner
  6. manually adjust the node positions that still don't match now.

This results in: https://pastebin.com/t0PzPghw

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