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Does anyone know what style/category this type of illustration falls under, and any tips on where to learn more about this would be appreciated.

ad for a/c

  • Hi there and welcome to GDSE. Are you able to draw this kind of drawings with a pencil and want to learn about how to achieve the same finish? Or are you looking for a way to learn how to actually draw these kinds of characters? – Wolff Jul 30 at 15:42
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    Hi RoyM and welcome to GDSE! Please see our guidelines for style-identification questions – curious Jul 30 at 15:42
  • Thanks for responding so quickly; I'm able to draw, yes.. wanted to see what style the illustrations could be classified as, so I could search for books on the subject. Sorry if that doesn't follow the guidelines well, but I'm just getting started on this forum :) – RoyM Jul 30 at 15:51
  • That style was also witnessed in animation, that might yield some leads – curious Jul 30 at 15:59
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That looks like mid-century modern style or mid-mod for short. It is characterized by quirky angular characters, cartoon eyes, and bold vintage colors. Some Hanna-Barbera material is similar such as the Pink Panther and the Flintstones, so you might also find examples by looking for the Hanna-Barbera style.

In your example, there is also a limited palette and very obvious halftoning.

Searching for "mid-century modern illustration" on Google, you'll find much more: examples, tutorials, brush sets, palettes. YouTube also seems to have some resources.

It is trending again in 2019 as modern mid-century modern style. Here is an interesting read about this which also includes a bunch of nice examples : https://99designs.ca/blog/design-history-movements/mid-century-modern-design/

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    Characteristically printed with only spot color, too. – user8356 Aug 1 at 13:53
  • @user8356 Yes definitely! Back in those days, maybe not today. But the example in the question shows some overprint to mix the colors (and also some registration issues that add to its charm) :) – curious Aug 1 at 14:01
  • Also characteristic that the halftone areas (at least) were made by cutting out and layering pieces of film so it's really a predecessor to digital vector graphics. – Wolff Aug 1 at 15:42

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