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I currently try to add more effects into my photos.

In my next project, I would like to add light beams representing the perspective.

For the lack of the better example, these light blue beams from the game Detroit: Become Human are probably the closest to what I need to accomplish. Please note that the beams do not go only into the depth (Z axis) but also create several matrices in X and Y axes on certain depth treshold.

example of the beams

While trying, I found that

  • Creating a 2d grid and duplicating and shrinking to emulate depth does not work. (Obviously, in the hindsight)

  • Using Vanishing point filter in the Photoshop I managed to create somewhat OK borders, but it does not generate the grid inside.

If possible at all, I would like to avoid creating each line separately using line tool, as that would take a ridiculous amount of time to space and align the lines correctly. Also, the vanishing point will not be necessary in the middle of the screen.

I wonder if there is a trick, tool or prerecorded action to make this easier.

Also, while my PC has specs to deal with 3D rendering capabilities of Photoshop, I have no prior experience with it, nor do I believe that to be the right tool to use, since these beams will be blended to the 2D photo afterwards.

Thanks in advance

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You could potentially try something like sketchup, set the image you want as the viewport background image. Draw a base "floor" box, then align the viewport to look correct and drop a camera.

It's quite a simple visual snap box drawing tool beyond that from that camera's point of view.

You can then remove the image at a later date and export the wireframe as a super high res png or another applicable format and drop that on top of your image in photoshop and manipluate it from there?

Rough idea, but it might work and be less work intensive than a proper 3d application or drawing the lines manually.

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