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When creating a poster in Photoshop with 300 dpi settings and export to high res PDF, text do not look crisp enough (after rasterizing text objects). Will it look good after print? Or should text objects remain not rasterized?

UPD Zoom in PDF view 600%, but compare artwork elements with rasterized text enter image description here

  • Are you viewing your PDF above 100% view? – AndrewH Oct 31 '19 at 17:31
  • @AndrewH Yes) Zooming in – Olenia Oct 31 '19 at 21:41
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    @Olenia you can't zoom in on raster images and expect it to look good. If you do that you will see pixels. View raster images at 100% (1:1). – Billy Kerr Nov 1 '19 at 7:54
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It is traditionally best to not rasterize text if it can be avoided. If you save a PDF for high quality print output using Photoshop and don't rasterize the text, it will be embedded within the PDF and print using vectors and type hinting. Type hinting can be crucial for small text (below 12pts). There's little reason to rasterize text for output in most cases.

As for whether something "will look good after printing" -- There's no way for anyone here to know. We can't see your artwork.

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  • Thanks! Text size is >>12pt. Sure, I'm asking a basic question, because the text in Photoshop looks always weirdly pixelated to me, so I am wondering if it is a good tool to prepare print items with text at all. – Olenia Oct 31 '19 at 21:44
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    There is nothing inherently wrong with using Photoshop for print projects. It may not be the easiest tool for some projects. However, provided the file is configured at the correct PPI, size, and color space, there's no reason a Photoshop file would not reproduce correctly on press. – Scott Nov 1 '19 at 2:22
  • In addition, zooming will almost always make the visible edge of pixels more apparent. View at 100%. – Scott Nov 1 '19 at 2:59

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