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I have a few mobile phones' structural designs in my mind and want to propose them for pitching. I need to create the designs on paper and then represent them like this:

enter image description here

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    The images at the link you posted are not photographs. They are entirely digital 3D renderings, and do not exist in the real world. I would recommend you look into beginner 3D modeling software. – 13ruce Nov 5 at 15:24
  • I fixed the image / link and tags since this question has nothing to do with Adobe Indesign (and the [mobile] tag is only for creating content for mobile). I'm not sure the question is salvageable though, since it's quite broad - there are quite a lot of steps to go from idea to image, and it's not fast or simple. – Luciano Nov 5 at 15:30
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    Be sure you understand that physical goods have no copyright provisions. This means that unless you have applied for a design patent then you have no protection or extra negotating powers. Showing the image means that they can now manufacture the thing on their own. Additionally by showing the concept you lost the ability to make the design patent. So unless your image is paired with a mature manufacturing design this may in fact be copied by others. Be sure you trust your partners. – joojaa Nov 5 at 15:54
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this site is about graphic design not industrial design. – joojaa Nov 5 at 15:55
  • Thanks for pointing me towards the field of 3d modelling. I know now where to go from there. I think Adobe Dimension would do the job. Thanks everyone else for taking out their time. And yeah thanks for the patent suggestion. I appreciate it and will keep that in mind – Satyam Srivastava Nov 5 at 17:39
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If you have new geometric forms, you should build 3D models. You cannot make it by editing existing images if they do not exist. With 2D software such as Photoshop or Illustrator you must be a highly skilled draughtsman and software user to get new forms right.

In 3D modelling software you can experiment easily with different views, materials and structures. In 2D you must draw every view separately. 2D is theoretically enough for every image on paper but to reach the needed skill level one must practice years.

Start to learn 3D modelling. I guess you can get something worth to show in few months instead of years.

If you do not need 100% realistic materials, practical manufacturability nor plausible functionality you can get something very quickly. See this Phony Jailman 2020. One can draw it in twelve minutes after learning some most basic 3D skills

enter image description here

  • I'd say it's not so much about geometric forms but physical products. Even simple mobile phone shapes will look more realistic when rendered from a 3D model and good light / materials. – Luciano Nov 5 at 15:33
  • Thanks for pointing me towards the field of 3d modelling. I know now where to go from there. I think Adobe Dimension would do the job. Thanks everyone else for taking out their time. And yeah thanks for the patent suggestion. I appreciate it and will keep that in mind – Satyam Srivastava Nov 5 at 17:39
  • @SatyamSrivastava - consider tools like Shapr3D, or OnShape which are low-to-no cost for quite effective power and optmised workflows - there are a lot of product designers using those two as their primary modeling / CADD tools.I myself use both, and also Modo, but those two are low-to-no cost, and OnShape's workflows and systems are very like SolidWorks, and it supports all the most needed file formats. Good luck! – GerardFalla Nov 6 at 16:56
  • @GerardFalla - Thank you for your references. I'll look into those as well. – Satyam Srivastava Nov 7 at 9:03

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