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I am looking to find a way to draw a horizontal line of full page width on a PNG file with a single click. Thing is I am trying to draw a lot of lines and if I've to click and drag it becomes extremely inefficient.

I am working on a Windows platform.

How can I achieve this using Adobe Photoshop? (or with Inkscape/CorelDraw?) Any ideas?

Thanks

Here is a sample of page. Green lines are the ones drawn. enter image description here

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    OK, but then why generate the lines by clicks at all? Why not autogenerate them instead. I mean sure if you do a 100 lines a day your going to save a whopping 50 seconds of your life. But its still hit/ miss as it assumes all you clicks hit the perfect spot but generating that would hit them right every time imaginable – joojaa Jun 6 at 12:55
  • Isn't is "just a click" already if you duplicate one line? Okay.. it's an option/alt click-drag. Which I guess is too much? – Scott Jun 6 at 17:59
  • Yeah, it's going to be in thousands. Thank you for sharing thoughts. – dhuvvamundha Jun 7 at 9:48
  • It looks like you are making page layout for print in Photoshop. Everything, including making horizontal lines, would be easier in InDesign. – Wolff Jun 7 at 14:04
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I don't think you need a script for that. You could just record an action that fills the current selection with the foreground color and assign a keyboard shortcut to it.

Then you can use the "Select Tool: Single Line" to select a single line of pixels and trigger your shortcut. Should make for a super fast workflow.

| improve this answer | |
  • filling the current selection would mean I'd have to make a selection right? – dhuvvamundha Jun 6 at 12:05
  • Yes, but if you set the selection tool to single line (long click on the selection tool and then select single line option), it enables you to make the selection by a single click which makes it really fast. – mdomino Jun 6 at 12:07
  • ah, thanks - let me try that and get back. thanks again. – dhuvvamundha Jun 6 at 12:13
  • It's not a single click and makes me use both hands but works as you've mentioned and it takes a huge load off than drawing lines - thank you @mdomingo – dhuvvamundha Jun 7 at 9:46

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