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I am looking for a font with connected holes like this for my vinyl printing project:

enter image description here

But what is this type of font called?

EDIT

With PieBie answer, I found plenty of stencil fonts and I made some tests with my Vinyl Cutter (Graphtec CE7000) and I was disappointed because it is quite difficult to remove the liner without removing some of the letters.

I noticed letters such as C, K or E don't need any cut. Only letters with true holes need a cut such as A, O, D... I would appreciate any complement to the answers.

  • Why are you looking for this style of font? If it’s because you want to weed out the scrap by just pulling one big piece off, that’s almost impossible to do. – Alith7 Aug 27 at 0:39
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    While such letters as C, U and S don't need cuts (bridges) from a topological perspective, in real life it would make stencils too weak and likely to break, or flap under the brush movements. Just imagine how G would behave without support. – IMil Aug 27 at 1:04
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    As @IMil says - I've been doing some real stencilling recently and the flapping and associated bleeding of paint isn't to be underestimated especially on vertical surfaces. It can be an issue with spraying too, if you're working fast (i.e. putting on more per coat) – Chris H Aug 27 at 11:33
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    Note that a stencil font looks nicely like stencilled lettering. That doesn't say anything about its ability to be cut on a given material or process, let alone without significant effort. As originally used, a fairly robust stencil would have been used many times, so stencil production could be a little fiddly - it was toolmaking – Chris H Aug 27 at 11:35
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I have seen such fonts be called Stencil fonts. A quick Google search confirms this is probably what you want.

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    Yup. So named so they can be punched through a die and be a letter. – Stian Yttervik Aug 26 at 8:19
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To expand on PieBie's accepted answer, there are a large number of stencil fonts to choose from. (My favourite, for a distinctive look, is "Marsh Stencil"

If you're planning on using the font as a stencil (i.e. as a negative mask) in Vinyl, I'd suggest avoiding fonts with narrow "bridges". In stencil fonts, these are the bits that join the inner "islands" to the outer parts.

Diagram of the parts of a stencil

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stencil

If, on the other hand, you're just looking for a stencil aesthetic, you can probably relax this criteria. Instead, you'll probably want to avoid overly narrow stems.

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