0

I am far from a skilled artist, so sorry if the question has a common answer. I couldn't find anything, but perhaps my lack of knowledge on the subject prevents me from even knowing what to be searching for. I am using gimp, if that changes anything.

As the title says, I'm trying to remove a transparent colored bar from an semi complex image. The bar in question goes over several different colors and shades. The only color information i have available to me is a sample of the original color from a non-covered region, and the same color from under the colored area.

Here's an example of what I'm trying to solve, incase my explanation isn't clear enough. Using the information only available in this image, would it be reasonable possible to remove the orange area?

Example of the problem in question

Any help at all would be appreciated.

Edit: Due to the sample image not being fully representative of the problem in question, i've created a more accurate sample image.

enter image description here

Original image from "@Daue0526Zg" on twitter, I merely edited it for for an example of the problem.

0

This is for GIMP, and the same would be possible in Photoshop.

Although not perfect, using your second image as an example, it would be possible to select the green area using the Fuzzy Select tool (aka Magic Wand), and remove most of it using a curves adjustment on the green channel by pulling a curve, then maybe increase the brightness and contrast. Obviously, it would probably need further manual retouching such as smudging or sampling and painting, or cloning.

enter image description here

3
  • Thanks, this seems like a good option, i tried the before with little success, but it looks like its just my lack of practice that made it not function. After trying to emulate what you've done in your gif, i got much better results than before. I'll leave this post open for a few more hours incase someone else has other options, but this will probably end up being what i go with. – Jojovitch_ Jan 16 at 11:36
  • @Jojovitch_ Yeah, there's no magic fix for this kind of thing unfortunately. – Billy Kerr Jan 16 at 11:37
  • @Jojovitch_ this is similar to the kind of problems you can sometimes encounter in Photo restoration, to remove or repair damaged areas of a photograph, removing colour casts etc, so it might be worthwhile looking up tutorials for that. – Billy Kerr Jan 16 at 11:48
0

I did this in Photoshop, but Gimp has similar tools.
I just thought the quickest way was to brute-force it ;)

Use the Magic Wand selector to outline your first replacement ares…

enter image description here

Then the Paint Bucket tool. Alt/click in the green, then click inside the selection

enter image description here

Rinse & repeat with the other areas…

enter image description here

3
  • I should clarify, though in the example this may be possible, the original image has shading and small details that are completely covered by the colored area. – Jojovitch_ Jan 16 at 9:58
  • @Jojovitch_, perhaps then you could post an example closer to the image you have? With such a simple aliased image as this there are many ways of removing the unwanted color, which wouldn't be possible with a more complex image with anti-aliasing and many shades. – Wolff Jan 16 at 10:08
  • I will attempt to find a suitable image to make an example with, as i don't have the permission to repost the original image. Will edit OG post momentarily. – Jojovitch_ Jan 16 at 10:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.