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enter image description here

I'm trying to dissolve, subdue (What's the correct term?) that glaring, brazen, straight clear cut boundary between the blue and green. I want the blue and green to gradient and meld smoothly (What's the correct term?) into each other. I'm using GIMP, as COVID unemployed me.

  1. Isn't it faster and productiver to use the Blur/Sharpen Tool?

  2. If you recommend the Blur/Sharpen Tool, must I click it along the whole length of the boundary between the two colors? How many times must I click it at the boundary?

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  • Why not use blur filter. Its less prone to error, its an action rather than a tool.
    – joojaa
    Oct 11 '21 at 6:07
  • It's easier to make a gradient using the Gradient Tool. see example. Although there is nothing to stop you from making a selection, and using the Gaussian Blur filter.
    – Billy Kerr
    Oct 11 '21 at 7:04
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The correct term is probably "blend".

Then, it all depends what you are doing.

  • If I had two rectangular areas next to each other I would sample each color, make a selection on the whole thing and redraw a gradient, using the "Gradient" (ex-"Blend") tool.
  • Another option is to make a selection on the whole thing and apply a Gaussian blur (horizontal only)
  • If you want to use the blur tool: you can try to increase the "Force" in the Tool options and/or use a harder brush. You don't need to click hundreds of times, just depress the left mouse button and wiggle the mouse over the cut.

But keep in mind that the blur tool is mostly meant to put finishing touches to pictures so it is designed to be subtle. It is also a lot more usable with a tablet (where pressure can be converted to effect).

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  • The GIMP developers changed the name of the "Blend Tool" to "Gradient Tool" in 2.10.x I believe.
    – Billy Kerr
    Oct 11 '21 at 7:16
  • @BillyKerr Fixed, thx
    – xenoid
    Oct 11 '21 at 7:35

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