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I'm trying to learn about typography and I made this image, but I wasn't sure this was the arm because it's at the bottom of the letter. Can anyone help, please?

enter image description here

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  • I saw one instance of it being referred to as an "arm" but doesn't make logical sense to me. Others refer to it as possibly the "spur" on the end of a "leg". Or a "terminal" or even a "beak". Quite confusing.
    – JeffK
    Apr 19, 2022 at 16:26
  • Imagine it without a serif... i.e. Helvetica.... it's just an arm. The serif can confuse things, but the serif alone doesn't change it from an arm.
    – Scott
    Apr 19, 2022 at 17:01
  • I don't disagree that it can be called am arm - but the part that is highlighted might be considered two parts not just one.
    – JeffK
    Apr 19, 2022 at 19:03
  • Thank you these comments are really helpful!
    – Grace
    Apr 21, 2022 at 10:17
  • I agree with @JeffK .... the highlight in the sample image is simply misplaced. Which doesn't help.. and surely leads to the confusion.
    – Scott
    Apr 22, 2022 at 18:17

2 Answers 2

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I can't find a definitive resource especially identified to the "L" character. It's possible that you're also dealing with 2 parts of anatomy and not just one.

But here are some samples:

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Edit 4/22/22: Here is another diagram that might be the closest to refining the definition by breaking that part of the character into two parts and not just one:

enter image description here

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  • So in your middle drawing, you refer to it as a leg, not an arm so which one do you think it is most likely to be?
    – Grace
    Apr 21, 2022 at 10:16
  • Sorry about the confusion - but I can't seem to find a definitive resource about this particular part of type anatomy. The deeper I go the more conflicting/confusing the terminology. Just this morning, found one that called that part an "arm with a serif". As a suggestion, I would color the entire "arm" blue and not just half of it. Then calling it an arm with a beak or serif might do. I was hoping someone with deep typography experience would also add to the conversation.
    – JeffK
    Apr 22, 2022 at 11:46
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I believe these are commonly called serifs. Perhaps 'arm' or 'beak' are used too, I'm not sure how commonly used that is.

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  • Check the other answer. I believe the arm/leg and the serif/beak are different parts, not the same.
    – Luciano
    Jan 17 at 14:45
  • @Luciano Sure, I hear ya. I was talking about these things in general, not referring to specific parts ;)
    – paddotk
    Jan 18 at 8:53

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