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I am relatively new to GIMP. My apologies in advance if my query is too naïve.

I have to create a web advert of 300x250px and max 50kb.

I have three images that I want to add to this advert:

  • A png file that has text and gradient background that I created using PowerPoint
    (.png file, 960x720px, 80kb)
  • A high-resolution image of a product which is being promoted
    (.tiff file, 2460x3370px, 5mb)
  • And a company logo (.png file, 1264x405px, 35 kb)

I stated with a 300x250px template in Gimp and added the three files - the product image and the company logo are embedded in the background file.

As I add all three files, the final image in GIMP suddenly gets very blurry and the exported .png image is also not sharp and larger than 50kb.

If I scale image to adjust size, it gets even more blurry.

What should I do?

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  • What is the size in pixels of the final image? You are working with images of very different sizes, so possibly something was scaled up in your workflow. Also, with non-CGI images (photo of your product) there is little PNG compression so your 300x250px image can get as big as 300Kb.
    – xenoid
    Feb 15 at 22:22
  • The size in pixels of the final image is 300x250px
    – NJ-11
    Feb 15 at 22:58

1 Answer 1

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Several factors....

Scaling always involve some interpolation and this introduces some blur, even when down-scaling.

  • Blur is especially visible on the hard edges that you can find on text and CGI.
    • So, the text and gradient part should be created at the final size directly in Gimp.
    • If possible, try to find the company logo as a vector file (SVG, EPS) and import/render it directly at its final size.
  • On photos, large down-scaling can create artifacts due to spatial aliasing. A non-intuitive way of reducing this is to blur the image before down-scaling, just enough to remove all details/texture that will anyway be lost in the down-scaling (final size around one pixel or less).

PNG compression is not good on photos, so if the product image is a significant part of the final image, there won't be much compression and your PNG could be as big as 300KB.

Also, if you work with high precision (16 or 32-bit) the PNG export will default (automatic pixelformat) to 16-bit per channel, doubling the image size. In that case specify one of the 8bpc formats (RGB or RGBA if you have transparency) in the PNG export dialog.

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